Speaker warm up / run in

electro_N1k

Active Member
Hi guys.

I've pretty much previously only been able to afford second hand or ex-shop model speakers :rolleyes:, so have never been forced to go through this with some new speakers...

So, a pair of B&W 601's - bought new. For how long a duration should I play them at modest levels for, before figuratively 'opening the throttle'?? :D

Thanks!
 

HiFiRuss71

Distinguished Member
There are no touching moving parts, so you're not running them in in the way a car engine would. There are no parts have to bed into each other.

Running in in the case of speakers is just a case of getting the surrounds and spiders to loosen up and flex a bit easier. As such, the more you hammer them, the faster it happens.:smashin:

Russell
 

Scott_Mac

Distinguished Member
When people talk about running in, as Russ says, it's more about loosening things up, the speakers will sound better after a time as the various bits that move will not be as stiff, less inertia etc etc
 

electro_N1k

Active Member
Running in in the case of speakers is just a case of getting the surrounds and spiders to loosen up and flex a bit easier. As such, the more you hammer them, the faster it happens.:smashin:

Russell

Thanks Russell. :smashin:

I was under the impression though that you could damage your speakers by taking them too loud too fast. Is this in fact a fallacy to which I have succumbed? :eek:
 

GW43

Well-known Member
Some studies have shown that speakers "run in" from new in a matter of seconds. Elsewhere I've read that speakers need to "warm up", and I think personal experience shows that my system sounds better after half an hour or so.

Whether it's the system changing, or me getting used to it - who knows. Or cares for that matter!

I think the magazine recommendations that speakers need 30, 50, 100 hours running in to be dubious. If there was that much difference, don't you think manufacturers would find a way of "pre-running-in" so that their stuff sounded as it should right out of the box?
 

doublej

Active Member
My Mordaunt Short 902i's ask for 36 hours on the packaging.

There was a noticeable difference after about 2 hours solid listening, but nothing after that.

i'm still waiting for the midrange to appear months later :)
 

electro_N1k

Active Member
OK, thanks guys :smashin::smashin:

Sound test tonight then!! Wish me luck ;)
 

Ricky27

Well-known Member
There is a way to speed up run in, put the speakers together with drivers face to face and wire one out of phase, this will sound odd as they cancel each others sound out to a certain level, so you can let them play overnight, then just enjoy them.
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
agent_smith -
"I was under the impression though that you could damage your speakers by taking them too loud too fast. Is this in fact a fallacy to which I have succumbed?"

Well, you can damage them by taking them too loud too fast, but that has nothing to do with breaking them it, it is merely a matter of common sense.

So, next, exactly what is too loud? You say you are going to cruise for a while before you crank them up, but you don't define 'cruise' or 'crank them up'. I suspect that you will do fine at any listening level below 40% turn of the
Volume Control, which is likely to be quite loud. If you've gone more that 40% of the volume control, I think you should be more worried about the neighbors and the cops than the speakers.

I've always said that it is the guy running the volume control that damages speakers, not overpower or underpowered amps, or lack of proper break in.

I think with new speakers you can listen to them at any normal listening level. Do this for a week or so before you throw a 'blow the windows out' party.

Just my opinion.

Steve/bboyminn
 

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