Question Speaker internal crossover specification

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Speakers' started by kalniel, Aug 18, 2016.

  1. kalniel

    kalniel
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    Hi!

    I'm comparing Monitor Audio Bronze 5 and 6, and quite obviously I know the 6 with its bigger and additional cones will push more air for bass. But I'm interested how this is depicted in the specifications:

    Bronze 5:
    LF: -6dB @ 600Hz
    MF/HF: 2.8kHz

    Bronze 6:
    LF: -6dB @ 150Hz
    MF/HF: 2.5kHz

    I'm used to crossover notation with respect to a subwoofer, but I'm less clear how it's used within a floorstander like these.

    Is it saying that in the case of the 5, frequencies are split with the bass-cone handling 600Hz and below, mid-cone 600-2800Hz, and tweater 2800Hz+? Or as these are 2.5 way is the split more simply 600Hz and below to the bass, while 600+ go to mid+tweater together?

    On the other-hand, the 6 has a 1" larger mid-cone, so they push 150+Hz to the mid, and sub 150Hz goes to the dual bass-cones?

    It seems either way, the bass cones have a 6dB penalty, but on the 6 this only affects the sub 150Hz region while on the 5s this is going to affect everything below 600Hz?

    Yes, I should probably just get out and test them both (added caveat is the NR 1506 AMP is borderline powerful enough for the 6s, only [email protected] Ohms), or save up and buy a sub to go with the 5s?
     
  2. AudioVisualOnline

    AudioVisualOnline
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    The -6 indication is specifying the crossover slope, not attenuation to a driver specifically, or its entire working range. The crossover doesnt just brick wall stop frequencies at a set point, they are gradually attenuated so the drivers blend together during operation, and this is what this figure typically tells us. Its actually impossible to give a set crossover frequency because of this gradual attenuation, the speaker still produces output below or above a stated crossover frequency, its just that it drops off, so the LF: -6dB @ 600Hz statement is telling us the LF driver is 6db down by the time its producing frequencies as high as 600Hz.
     
  3. kalniel

    kalniel
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    Oh thanks! That makes more sense.
     

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