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Speaker Impedance

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Speakers' started by contactadam2002, Sep 10, 2005.

  1. contactadam2002

    contactadam2002
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    If a speaker says that it can take from 4-8 ohms and the amp also says the same (4-8ohms), then what impedance is it likely to run at and why?
     
  2. Troon

    Troon
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    The speaker *is* 4 to 8 ohms (varying with frequency), and the amp is happy driving it. No worries.
     
  3. Steve.EX

    Steve.EX
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    The speaking will not "take" anything. It is an indication of the load the speaker will present to the amplifier.
    The amplifier markings indicate the range of impedance rated speakers it would prefer to have connected to it.
    It is usual for a speaker to have an impedance rating that is "nominal", that is to say that the impedance will swing either side of that rating (dependant primarily on the frequencies it is producing at any given time and the crossover design). In Kef land, they quote a nominal rating and a minimum rating which is most thoughtful and tells us a predictable worse case senario (low impedance = hard work in amplifier terms).
    There is a million easy to read pages on this site to save me the job, have a look...... essentially you are dealing with simple ohms law.
     

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