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Speaker cable and aerial cable in same trunking - does it cause interference

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Speakers' started by Paul.Scrivens, Mar 11, 2002.

  1. Paul.Scrivens

    Paul.Scrivens
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    Hi,

    To hide my speaker cable I have put some trunking down. However half way down the trunking I have fed my Aerial cable through it (NTL Cable) which then goes into the NTL box. Will this cause any interference?

    I'm also waiting on a cable to connect my sub to the amp. Will there be any problems if I also feed this trhough the trunking?

    Cheers

    Paul
     
  2. Paul.Scrivens

    Paul.Scrivens
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    If it does cause too much interference I could buy 2 lengths of smaller thrunking (Half the size) - stick them together so it looks like one, This way I can seperate the cables.
     
  3. bob007

    bob007
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    I think it's all down to the quality of the shielding of each cable, would think the NTL cable has a good shielding to it, nothing like your 15p/m coax at B&Q, so i would say you are safe with that.
    As for the sub cable same again shielding is the key.
    Also try and avoid running cables near the mains, as this can cause interference aswell.
    Can't see your trunking causing you any problems.....
     
  4. Darth Vader

    Darth Vader
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    I agree with bob007

    Provided the shielding is good enough, you should have no problems. my UHF aerial lead has to cross the speaker wire at one point and causes no problems.

    Re: Electrical mains interference, this usually manifests itself as 50Hz hum (i.e. bassy), 50Hz being the osilaition of the UK mains electrical supply, and can be quite a problem.
     

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