Space exploration

Why there is no Earth-like planets? NASA published data on a new exoplanet TOI 700 d. This object is approximately equal to the Earth in size, and is located at such a distance to its star, which could provide liquid water on its surface. The bitter truth is that with the technology we have now, we will never reach any of the exoplanets, let alone send humans there. This was recently confirmed by the 2019 Nobel Prize winner in physics Michael Mayor, the first scientist to discover a planet outside the solar system in 1995. According to him, the migration of humanity to another exoplanet is absolutely crazy, because people will need to fly at least 11 years at the speed of light to get to the nearest exoplanet that circles around another star and has temperature characteristics acceptable to humans.
 

rustybin

Distinguished Member
It's infinitely more likely that we'll be in a position to make places in space more habitable than we'll get to Earth 2.

It'll be a very slow spreading out process to get to inhabitable planets..

But Ark-Ships. Static / movable Habitats etc will be more than doable over the next century or two or three.
 

Xenomorph

Member
Am I right in saying Einstein ruled out FTL space travel, so warp drive technology won't happen?

Then there is the possibility of stasis? Could that happen, to allow space travel over decades, possibly hundreds of years?
 

rustybin

Distinguished Member
Am I right in saying Einstein ruled out FTL space travel, so warp drive technology won't happen?

Then there is the possibility of stasis? Could that happen, to allow space travel over decades, possibly hundreds of years?
Zefram Cochrane > Albert Einstein.
 

Jules Tohpipi

Well-known Member
Am I right in saying Einstein ruled out FTL space travel, so warp drive technology won't happen?

Then there is the possibility of stasis? Could that happen, to allow space travel over decades, possibly hundreds of years?
Einstein said it’s not possible to travel through space time faster than the speed of light. However, no such limit was placed on space time itself, for example, expanding faster than light speed (as proposed in current cosmic inflation theory).
 
Well, if we mentioned science fiction then I have a question: did someone read or watch The Expanse? What do you think about James Corey's vision of Solar system colonization?
 

Stan Hope

Active Member
Can I ask, what is the fascination with living on Mars? It has no breathable atmosphere, no beautiful landscapes as we see on Earth. You'd be trapped living indoors for the rest of your life. Seems like a pretty dismal existence.
but by that time, we''ll have 90 inch 64k Supa Dupa OLED, and they'll be cheaper on Mars, because of tax breaks, so out door oxygen will just be a minor issue.
 

Mandark

Active Member
Well, if we mentioned science fiction then I have a question: did someone read or watch The Expanse? What do you think about James Corey's vision of Solar system colonization?

I've read most of the books and watched the show so far. The writers have built upon earlier works of the inhabited solar system and given it a modern spin. The hard science bits are very believable. The Mormons are even building a generation ship to colonise an exoplanet although that project doesn't go quite to plan...

The one thing I don't believe is that we'll have hollowed out asteroids with thousands, if not millions, of poor people living in them. I think space colonisation will remain expensive for a very, very long time so those who live out in the solar system will be well paid professionals. I can't imagine us seeing slums with bums and rough neighbourhoods any time in outer space.
 

Mandark

Active Member
Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars Trilogy explains how it might happen. Clearly that's science-fiction for now though. But so was walking on the Moon once upon a time.

I have a story about him! :D Several decades ago I was in London for a shopping trip and decided to visit Forbidden Planet (huge sci-fi book shop). The shop was crowded and nerds were queuing up with hardback copies of this new book Red Mars waiting to get them signed.

It was busy and some thin bespectacled guy tried to push pass me roughly. I wasn't impressed so pushed back and he looked at me surprised. I watched to see where he went and of course he rushed round in front of the book signing desk and started signing books. It was KSR himself! I didn't know much about him or his book. It did cross my mind to join the queue but after that bit of argy bargy I decided best not bother!

Anyway, you can't argue much against his ideas of terraforming. Extremely well researched!
 
Mandark, actually, this is an allegory that demonstrates an impartial reflection of the world, not as it might be in two hundred years, but as it is today. So the actress Shohre Aghdashlu speaks about the series in a similar vein: “When we started shooting, I kept asking:“ What kind of science fiction? Why fiction? There is no fiction here. Everything I see on the [script] page I see on the news as well. ”
 

Mandark

Active Member
Mandark, actually, this is an allegory that demonstrates an impartial reflection of the world, not as it might be in two hundred years, but as it is today. So the actress Shohre Aghdashlu speaks about the series in a similar vein: “When we started shooting, I kept asking:“ What kind of science fiction? Why fiction? There is no fiction here. Everything I see on the [script] page I see on the news as well. ”

Yes that's fair comment. Nearly all science fiction is really a different take on or an extrapolation of the present.

There's quite a lot of modern hard sci-fi solar system based fiction coming out from lower profile sci-fi authors. A lot of it is on Kindle Unlimited. I'm currently reading The Belt Quadrilogy by Gerald M Kilby which reads a lot like The Expanse series at times! :D
 

Captain Ron

Well-known Member
The discussion of relativity and time dilation effects on experienced journey time in Andy "The Martian" Weir's "Operation Hail Mary" is extremely thought provoking. Basically what he implies is that if we crack fusion and can make a fusion engine capable of accelerating a ship up to around 90% of the speed of light then local cluster star systems are certainly reachable by humans and I for one find that a very uplifting thought. The book is a truly great story too and currently available half price in hardback from Asda.
 

Belzok

Well-known Member
I think its going to be quite slow going until we can start manufacturing, and sourcing raw materials, in orbit, or at the least on a low gravity place like the Moon.

I love watching the massive changes to spaceflight that SpaceX and Musk have managed to force into a very slow moving behemoth of an industry.

Not sure where I read it but us humans have taken several billion years to survive and thrive here on earth, and even so numerous stuff kills us easily.

Colonising another planet that already has its own life will be incredibly difficult I suspect, assuming we can get there.
 
No one claims that it will take little time to acieve such great accomplishment like colonization or interstellar journey. But with modern technologies we can say for sure that it will take less time than it would billion years ago :laugh: and it is good news that not only Elon Musk and his SpaceX are contributing to the development of space exploration. But also different agencies from all over the world. Both governmental and commercial. Like private rocket launch company - I like their intentions to use 3D printing technologies to power engines as well as their launch is fuelled using an eco-friendly fuel (Ecosene) made in part from waste plastics.
 

Captain Ron

Well-known Member
While it would indeed be awesome if we found life on another planet I don't think colonising such a place would be smart. Far better to colonise somewhere without life and not bugger up ANOTHER ecosystem. :)
 

BorkenArrow

Well-known Member
Why there is no Earth-like planets? NASA published data on a new exoplanet TOI 700 d. This object is approximately equal to the Earth in size, and is located at such a distance to its star, which could provide liquid water on its surface. The bitter truth is that with the technology we have now, we will never reach any of the exoplanets, let alone send humans there. This was recently confirmed by the 2019 Nobel Prize winner in physics Michael Mayor, the first scientist to discover a planet outside the solar system in 1995. According to him, the migration of humanity to another exoplanet is absolutely crazy, because people will need to fly at least 11 years at the speed of light to get to the nearest exoplanet that circles around another star and has temperature characteristics acceptable to humans.
This is not true, at the speed of light you can reach anywhere in the universe instantly.
 
This is not true, at the speed of light you can reach anywhere in the universe instantly.

As far as I know, the speed of light in a vacuum, reaching 299 792 458 meters per second, according to Einstein's special theory of relativity, is a universal physical constant, that is, nothing can ever move faster. This is the limiting speed of particle movement and propagation of interactions.
 

Belzok

Well-known Member
This is not true, at the speed of light you can reach anywhere in the universe instantly.
Takes light 8 1/2 minutes to get to earth from the sun, ish as orbits vary.

You maybe thinking of wormholes, Einstein Rosen bridges I think is the proper term.
 

BorkenArrow

Well-known Member
Takes light 8 1/2 minutes to get to earth from the sun, ish as orbits vary.

You maybe thinking of wormholes, Einstein Rosen bridges I think is the proper term.
No the speed of light is infinite, a light beam exists everywhere along its path at the same time.

This is relativity theory 101.
 

Belzok

Well-known Member
No the speed of light is infinite, a light beam exists everywhere along its path at the same time.

This is relativity theory 101.
So why does it take light 8 1/2 minutes to get from the sun to earth and what we see in the night sky, such as supernovae, happened a very long time ago?
 

BorkenArrow

Well-known Member
So why does it take light 8 1/2 minutes to get from the sun to earth and what we see in the night sky, such as supernovae, happened a very long time ago?
Because its relative to the observer.

To get to basics.....there is no such such thing as gravity, when mass is placed in space it distorts time and when time gets distorted, you move relative to it.

That's acceleration, in essence, gravity is just the acceleration you feel get drawn into the earths gravity well.

So, if you are on a space craft that is accelerating at 9.8m/s or 1G, then what you feel is no different to standing on the ground. You can get up and walk around just like you can on earth.

Now, if you keep that acceleration constant, you can live on that spaceship under iG gravity.

With that constant acceleration, the faster you go the slower time goes for everyone not on the spaceship but its constant on the spaceship. There is no limit to the velocity that spaceship can reach and you will cross the milky way galaxy in around 12 years ship time at that acceleration rate.
 

Belzok

Well-known Member
Because its relative to the observer.

To get to basics.....there is no such such thing as gravity, when mass is placed in space it distorts time and when time gets distorted, you move relative to it.

That's acceleration, in essence, gravity is just the acceleration you feel get drawn into the earths gravity well.

So, if you are on a space craft that is accelerating at 9.8m/s or 1G, then what you feel is no different to standing on the ground. You can get up and walk around just like you can on earth.

Now, if you keep that acceleration constant, you can live on that spaceship under iG gravity.

With that constant acceleration, the faster you go the slower time goes for everyone not on the spaceship but its constant on the spaceship. There is no limit to the velocity that spaceship can reach and you will cross the milky way galaxy in around 12 years ship time at that acceleration rate.
Okay so in terms of travel to another star it is going to take a very long time, both relative to the ship time and back here on earth, as there will be a lot of 1G acceleration and deceleration as us delicate flowers can't manage much else for long periods of time.
 

BorkenArrow

Well-known Member
Okay so in terms of travel to another star it is going to take a very long time, both relative to the ship time and back here on earth, as there will be a lot of 1G acceleration and deceleration as us delicate flowers can't manage much else for long periods of time.
That's basically, it.

Plus you need an virtually infinite power source to keep that thrust going constantly.
 

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