1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

soundproofed wall

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Building DIY' started by Lucky Scotsman, Dec 18, 2002.

  1. Lucky Scotsman

    Lucky Scotsman
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    I have my home cinema kit in my living room, which has an open stair case against the wall between me and my neighbour. I am planning on building a wall here to take the stair case out of the living room. Since I am going to this trouble, I've decided to do my best to make the room a bit more soundproof and keep my neighbour happy.

    Can anyone give me pointers on the best plasterboard to use on the inside and outside of the living room and what I should use for inside the wall?

    Thanks for your help.

    Colin
     
  2. nakker

    nakker
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    I have just done a similar thing in my living room by putting a new cavity wall in. Here are some hopefully helpful pointers.

    Wickes do several grades of plasterboard, the thickest being 12.5mm. 8ft x 4ft boarding will be the best option as it will mean that you will have less joints to make good. ( based on your room being 8ft ish high )
    Tapered edge plasterboard will allow you to use joint tape and joint compound to get a really good finish without having to plaster the new wall.
    As for soundproofing / insulation B&Q do a laminate flooring underlay made of green card which doubles as a soundproofing material for use under the plasterboard.It costs £18.99 and covers 9.6m sq
    In the cavity itself all DIY stores sell cavity / loft insulation either loose or as sheet panels. I found the loose stuff to be best.

    As a starter visit www.diy.co.uk which is the B&Q website and view / print off their HOW TO project guide to building a cavity wall.

    A new wall is an ideal opportuniry to add extra electrical sockets as well, but this will need planning into the job before you put on any plasterboard.

    As a finishing touch. Polycell do a new product called basecoat for walls which is basically a thick paint which can cover any small cracks / joints which you can't sand out. This made my projuect easier as it meant that I didn't have to plaster the new wall prior to painting.

    hope this helps??

    :cool:
     
  3. Lucky Scotsman

    Lucky Scotsman
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Thanks nakker. This is the type of info I was after, especially the underlay part. I wasn't aware that this was good for soundproofing. I will keep it in mind.
     
  4. Gary Lightfoot

    Gary Lightfoot
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2001
    Messages:
    12,411
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Surrey. UK.
    Ratings:
    +2,083
    Just to add to what Nakker has said:

    For soundproofing, quite often a new wall is built an inch in front of an existing wall using 4 x 2 wood for the frame work. It's filled from the existing wall outwards with insulation like that found at Wickes - they do three or four types, one of which is 30mm high density slabs, another is 65mm slabs. Cut to fit. Make sure gap between the wall is filled to act as a fire barrier.

    The insulation helps prevent any resonance within the wall, and helps reduce high frequency transmissions.

    Then fit two layers of half inch plasterboard (maybe use the green stuff inbetween). This is to add rigidity and to help reduce bass tranmsmission (mass is good at this).

    In your case you just fill the cavity with whatever insulation you choose, but can use two layers of plasterboard both sides for extra soundproofing. This will make a 6inch wall with two layers of plasterboard each side.

    I glued and screwed my two layers together to make the wall act as one thick piece of plasterboard.

    Make sure there are no air gaps, because where air can go, so can sound. Use silicon rubber to seal around the floor/skirting and walls and ceiling before fitting sjirting boards and coving.

    The door will be the weak point here, so you may have to get a solid door, and somehow try to make sure it closes with a very snug fit so that sound can't travel around/under it. Maybe some sealing strip around the door beading, and a heavy duty draught excluder?

    You won't totaly eliminate bass transmission because the vibrations will travel through whatever they touch, but at least you'll be reducing the sound.

    If you can measure the sound before and after you've built the wall (a sound pressure meter) and with the door open and closed, you'll get an idea of how well you've done

    HTH

    Gary.
     
  5. Alaric

    Alaric
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2001
    Messages:
    1,586
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    51
    Location:
    Peterborough, Cambs, UK
    Ratings:
    +94
    Hi there,

    For Plaster Board, try and get hold of a product called SoundBloc, its made by british gypsum and is a high density product and is specificaly designed for sound proofing probs. I know Travis Perkins can order it for you - I just got 5 boards from them, i do get a stupid discount from them, so it was only £4.50+vat a sheet, compaired with £3.70+vat they'd have charged me for ordinary stuff....I guess that probably equates to a couple of quid extra to the common man :D

    We are using it for builiding a stud wall, and the new ceiling in our room, but rather than soundproofing, we want the wall to be more solid and like a 'real wall' for acoustic purposes.

    The wife, an architect, said that its the industry standard to use two layers of this where you have sound transmition problems.

    Also one of the cheapest things you can do to improve the wall for sound is to seal, and re-seal....Prety much as you go along, seal the first board to each of the battons and noggings, seal the screws going through from behind, seal the gaps at the top, bottoms and edges....really go to town with a flexable sealant....they are relativly peanuts (£2-3 a tube) but will really make a difference....if it moves, seal it ;)

    cya,
    Lee (also wall building)
     
  6. dkwade

    dkwade
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2008
    Messages:
    5
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    Hi,

    I have noisy neighbours, we can hear them talking and banging their wardrobe door against our bedroom wall! We are looking to soundproof the whole party wall - upstairs and downstairs, we are looking at using the high density slabs from Wickes - has anyone used them? what are your thoughts?

    Thanks
     

Share This Page

Loading...