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Sound Proofing

Discussion in 'Subwoofers' started by drdaredevil, Jun 29, 2004.

  1. drdaredevil

    drdaredevil
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    Hi. Here's the deal... a little while ago i bought a KLH 10" 125 watt powered subwoofer for my room. My room is 15ft x 20ft x `10ft, so it is somewhat small for a subwoofer. Well my parents get mad everytime I have my music on because the sub raddles the walls around me. My sister's room is right next to mine and there is this vent going from my room to her's, i have no idea why. Well when you're in her room you can hear the walls raddling and it sounds horrible. I was thinking about stuffing something in the vent so that the sound wont travel through it and I was wondering what the two holes on the back of the sub do because they are throwing out air which I think might be the reason its banging. Is there anything I can do to minimize the wall raddling from my sub without stuffing my walls with insulation?

    Also, just so you know, my subs have 4 spikes on the bottom that supposedly make your floor raddle less. My floors are carpet with wood underneath so i suppose they carry sound easily. I've read some of you guys using marble slabs underneath the sub and i saw one of those pad things for $60 but i dont know which ones work. Any advice would be great.
     
  2. cosmic023

    cosmic023
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    Well you could try an Audax Grammar..............
    http://www.dolphinmusic.co.uk/d2/pa.../category_id/c01b88cf7e4f44652b47beb5b8c9ae82

    The Grammars work best with front firing subs, you didn't say if your sub was front or down firing sub ??

    I went with a diy version of the the grammar using a slab of MDF and foam blocks, and placed 18" Sq concrete slabs on top and underneath the sub.

    Sounds a lot tighter now, has helped a lot with reduction in bass travel through the floors.

    Not sure about the vent 'tho, maybe someone with building knowledge can help ??
     
  3. drdaredevil

    drdaredevil
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    I dont know how to tell whether or not my sub is front or down, but the two big holes are in the back of the sub and the air is pushed out the back. I happen to have a 2 inch thick block of granite not being used in my basement. Can I use that somehow?
     
  4. Ettepet

    Ettepet
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    One very effective thing you can do is decouple the sub from the floor. The Gramma helps, but is expensive and isn't really meant for subwoofers.

    Best way I know of is to put a heavy flat stone underneath the subwoofer, and put a couple of sliced-in-half squashballs underneath. The stone helps absorb much of the vibration of the subwoofer, the squashball-halves do the rest. You might experiment a little with different layers in between, as for instance I have a piece of carpet between my PB2+ and the concrete slabs I use.

    Another helpful thing is to buy an equalizer (BFD) if you have the $$$. Apart from helping you improve the frequency response of the sub in your current (and future) room, it also enables you to reduce soundlevels at remaining "annoying" frequencies.

    Low bass frequencies cannot easily be stopped by plugging a hole, as a lot of its energy will travel straight through most walls.
     
  5. drdaredevil

    drdaredevil
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    Hmm. It just so happens that I have a lot of things that i could use. I have a think slab of granite in my basement along with a lot of concrete tiles. What would you suggest I do with it? like tell me where to put what
     
  6. cosmic023

    cosmic023
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    What sort of costs are we talking about for a BFD ?? And how much difference does it make ??

    From what i've heard it sounds like a parametric eq. ??
     
  7. Nimby

    Nimby
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    The wall vent is to air the room when the doors are closed for long periods. It stops the air becoming stale or damp. Sometimes these vents have a decorative metal slide to close them off. You could try covering it or stuffing it (whichever is easier).

    The holes in the back of the subwoofer are essential to the design and should not be touched. They are "reflex ports" which pump air in and out at the lowest frequencies to reproduce the deepest bass that the sub is capable of.

    My gut feeling is that you have the sub turned up way too high. A subwoofer is meant to support the lower frequencies where the loudspeakers run out of steam in the bass. It's not a PA system trying to reproduce bass guitar at live performance levels!
    Play a rock or pop record and adjust the subwoofer so you can hardly hear it. But the bass guitar and kick drum should still sound nice and clear from your listening position. Anything above this level is just 'boom' and has nothing to do with reality.

    BTW: Most people would give their right arm for a 20 x 15 x 10 foot room to play in. "Small" is not the word I would choose!

    Nimby
     
  8. Ettepet

    Ettepet
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    There are several (recent) topics about the BFD, so I suggest you use "search".. ;)
     
  9. cosmic023

    cosmic023
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    Ettepet: Cheers 4 the info

    I've been looking @ the Snapbug site this morning about the BFD.

    Yeah the unit looks good, seems like a bit of a headache in setting it up 'tho, but then it looks like it can solve sub placements and room problems very nicely.

    Seems like they've got a newer model now, so maybe worth chasin' a deal on the older model ??

    I'll add one to the shoppin' list, once i've solved this problem over my speaker choices in another thread.

    Cheers

    Cosmic023
     
  10. Ettepet

    Ettepet
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    As far as I know there is no newer model, just a more expensive/capable one, the deq2496 (which I also own). Setting it up is more of a pain when starting out, because it isn't all that hard really. It helps when you measure with your computer though, because taking 20 or more measurements by hand can be a bit of a pain.
     
  11. cosmic023

    cosmic023
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    Well on the snapbug site they used the DSP1100P, and that it had been updated by the DSP1124P ??

    Again it could be old info ??
     
  12. Ettepet

    Ettepet
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    Yeah, lol, I was refering to the DSP1124, not the previous model that went out of production around a year ago (possibly before that even). :D
     
  13. cosmic023

    cosmic023
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    That solves that one then !! :D
     
  14. drdaredevil

    drdaredevil
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    Stuffing it might be easier but wont that make my room have "stale or damp" air? Would it make a huge difference in my room if it gets stuffed? I appreciate all these responses and I feel like we're almost there.

    I am also thinking whether or not I should just move the placement of my sub because I hear that this may make a difference. One of the problems is that the sub is under my bookshelf/desk. Its made of wood and its placed where you would put a chair. The holes in the back are placed 3" away from the wall where my door is (the door raddles) and is also very close to the vent and I think that a lot of the unwanted noise is from the vent banging on something. I was thinking of moving next to my dresser (which doesn't have anything to raddle) which is placed against a new wall that I think wont raddle as much.

    I meant small for a 10" powered subwoofer.
     
  15. lhalha

    lhalha
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    mate -

    isolate the sub using your granite slab and some squash balls as suggested above. If you cannot get squash balls where you live (maybe there are no squash courts in your area!?) then use anything soft and rubbery. In fact I am thinking, squash balls might be too weak for a large slab of stone anyway! If it is really big, then you could probably use tennis balls.

    Cut the balls in half (so maybe use a few) and then place them under the slab as "feet". Then put carpet on top of the slab if you have any lying around, and the sub on top of that. Your sub is now as good a floating off your floor as you will be able to achieve.

    Then turn down the volume on the sub amp (and adjust the crossover frequency if possible) so that your walls DON'T rattle. It's as simple as that - The sub is only meant to reinforce the bass - if you like the artificial boom sound then you are going to have to face up to the fact that in order to achieve this, the sound has to be at the kind of pressure that will shake the walls/doors/windows of just about anything other than a solid concrete apartment block... Also, move it so that the ports are more firing into the room not the wall.

    You'll see from my other posts that I am no expert, but the above seems like common sense to me. Also, remember sisters are there for you to annoy them.

    lhalha
     
  16. Ettepet

    Ettepet
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    My gut feeling says tennis balls might not be the right kind of rubber, but you should try it out to see what works best. The fun thing is you can get some used tennis balls very cheaply at the pet store, and with some effort the (used) squash balls can be gotten cheap or free as well.

    I use squash ball halves at the moment, and would go for more of those underneath the concrete slab if weight would be a problem.
     
  17. drdaredevil

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    Thank you everyone for posting. I am going to find those squash ball things and then once everything is taken care of, I will respond telling how it worked out.
     

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