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Sound proofing the floor

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Building DIY' started by R2D2, May 23, 2005.

  1. R2D2

    R2D2
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    I was looking into the possibility of putting a home cinnema into my loft and wondered what the best way to sound proof the floor it wld allready have 10 cm thick loft insilation under it is this ok or do I need to put somthing else in.

    :confused:
     
  2. gaz

    gaz
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    i asume your insulation will be between your joists therefore sound can still be transmitted through your sub-floor and through the joist and on to the ceiling bellow try sound deadning board meant for the instulation of laminate floors and some thick underlay if you are using carpet


    I was talking to the builder on the job i'm working on at the moment and he say's there is no problem using plaster board on the floor and if you feel the need then ply or hard board it over the top to give extra strength
     
  3. Roguey

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    using plaster board on the floor sounds an werid idea to me, as when its compressed it can break into smaller peices. It also isnt very good for 'point' loads either.

    either layer types of flooring (hardboarding, sound tiles etc.) or get the stuff designed for the job (very costly), however you are never really stop all the noise being transmitted as big subwoofers etc. cant be stop with some flooring (depending on how powerful the subwoofer is) unless you have an concrete room. It will help with the high and mid range stuff.

    I say this about subwoofer because in my upstairs it will shake the lights in the kitchen which was over like 30ft away and all joints are 6x2". You can put your hand under the floor (down stairs) and feel most of the ceiling shaking althou out the house, no plaster board, hardboard etc. is ever going to stop all that.
     
  4. gaz

    gaz
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    as rougey says the plaster board will break up in time which is why i assume the builder suggested covering it with board to prevent this.....................

    although i would still suggest the sound deadening boards as i first mentioned and if your budget alows you then go for the expensive ones that rougey suggests
     
  5. Gary Lightfoot

    Gary Lightfoot
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    You could place the sub on something like an Auralex 'Gramma' or 'Sub Dude', or you could make your own. There are a few threads covering this elsewhere, and it will help reduce the physical vibrations travelling into the floor. Adding something underneath the carpet as suggested should help to some degree I would think, but again, you can't stop bass traveling easily or cheaply.

    Mattym over in the room accoustics forum might have something that could help you out, so drop him a pm and see what they have to offer.

    Gary
     
  6. Bristol Pete

    Bristol Pete
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    Can I make a suggestion of a cheap alternative. :lesson:

    In my previous cinema room, we used acoustic floor tiles from B and Q which worked a treat. I noticed it when we were looking at laminate flooring and used it under the cinema room carpet.

    It worked very very well and I would often put Black Hawk Down on for reference, pop downstairs and not hear a thing from below, even with a REL Quake bellowing out.

    Hope this helps,

    Pete.
     
  7. eviljohn2

    eviljohn2
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    That's a very good idea Pete, do you think the tiles would be wall-mountable?
     
  8. mikeeastgate

    mikeeastgate
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    Hi,
    We looked into this last year. The point for us was to insulate the sound from the main livng room so that the children can be sent to bed while we watch a film.

    And the answer was, to lift the floorboards upstairs, and use sound insulation in the gap. We discovered that there is stuff like loft insulation, but designed for sound as well.

    This sounds like a good start for your loft.


    Here is a quote ...
    ACOUSTIC MINERAL WOOL is useful as a sound absorbing infill for the reduction of airborne noise in partition walls, between flooring joists and suspended ceilings.The density of this material is generally at least three times that of standard loft insulation so it's much more efficient at absorbing sound. The mass of fibreglass loft insulation is generally only around 20Kg/m³.


    from...

    http://www.diydoctor.org.uk/projects/sound_proofing_in_the_home.htm
     
  9. R2D2

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    cheers for all your help theres more options than I thought there would be :D
     
  10. avanzato

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    Go to the Rockwool site and look at the Rockfloor PDF data sheet in the technical centre section. It'll give you some ideas for what to do.
    Incidently plasterboard is used in the above examples but bonded to a final floor of chipboard.
     
  11. Bristol Pete

    Bristol Pete
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    Very doubtful as they are made of the odd non adhesive 'hairy' material.
     
  12. chedmaster

    chedmaster
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    captain benefit can you link to these floor tiles please i cant find them! thanks
     
  13. Bristol Pete

    Bristol Pete
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  14. chedmaster

    chedmaster
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    :) thanks alot :thumbsup:
     
  15. mattym

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    you can buy ready made flooring that has a viscoelastic strip, a soft fluffy side and a choice of either cement board or chipboard or mdf for a top layer, pretty good stuff too by all accounts!
     

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