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Sound proofing a ceiling?

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Building DIY' started by GavinBrowne, Jul 30, 2002.

  1. GavinBrowne

    GavinBrowne
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    Hi everyone,

    I am looking for advice on how best to soundproof the ceiling of my soon to be Home cinema. The room is being built as part of an extension and will be getting kitted out by Roland when the building work is complete.

    My only real concern is with the sound proofing of the ceiling as our new bedroom is going to be directly above the HC room. All of the walls of the room will be external walls as the new room is sandwiched betwen the existing outside wall of our house and the new garage.

    The builder has got to the point where the joists are in place so now would be an ideal time to decide on the best method of soundproofing for the ceiling of the room to try and prevent sound leakage up into the bedroom. I am committed to soundproofing being placed on the underside of the ceiling as the floor levels are already set for the first floor.

    Given that I have the opportunity to build the soundproofing into the ceiling does anyone have any suggestions either based on experience or articles you have read?

    Hopefully I can get it good enough to allow me to maintain a reasonable level of volume, even when the other half goes to bed.

    Any advice would be greatfully received.

    Cheers,
     
  2. nfordenfield

    nfordenfield
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    You could use soundblock plasterboard instead of standard, assume you could double board the ceiling as well, then use the void in the rafters to build up a sandwich of dense insulation, air gap fibreboard etc.

    Nathan
     
  3. GavinBrowne

    GavinBrowne
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    Nathan,

    Thanks for the reply. I will look into the soundblock plasterboard.

    Is it readily available or can it only be obtained from certain suppliers?

    Cheers,
     
  4. RichardH

    RichardH
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    I've not spent much time looking in to this, but even with soundblock plasterboard, isn't the most important thing to somehow decouple the ceiling from the floor joists above? Even if that is just with strips of rubber fixed along the undersides of the joists before the ground floor ceiling plasterboard is put in place?

    Or is that just plain silly.....
     
  5. JSW

    JSW
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    A sandwich of loft insulation, normal plaster board, loft insulation, normal plasterboard under the floor boards is sufficient.

    I used to live in a flat and wondered why I never heard the people above or below me, then when I changed the carpet to a hardwood floor due to new born baby puke all over the place, that is the sandwich i found under the chipboard flooring.
     
  6. Guest

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    A few years back, me & a pal built our own studio.
    We used to make (he still does) our own Drum & Bass tracks.
    I know this sounds a little 'off-the-wall' & i appreciate that it will never win a 'perfect for the home environment' award, we found that attaching carpet-underlay (the rippled rubber-topped stuff) to the walls & ceilings helped to 'dead' the room out.
    Underneath we used 4x2 timber with Loft insulation sandwiched
    between double plaster board...
    Considering we had no accoustic (obviously!!!!) knowledge, the carpet underlay actually did a pretty good job!....
    Have to say, it got extremely hot in there though!!!!!...
    We used the thickest underlay we could find....Once finished, it looked quite good...
    I certainly understand that most people would scoff @ the idea, but it's another way to try and cut down on the room booms!!!!

    Adzman
     
  7. Mike A

    Mike A
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    I recently sound proofed some of my party wall.

    A local company provided normal plasterboard with 25mm thick Rocslab bonded onto it. I then put 75mm slabs of the stuff between the stud joists and then screwed the plaster board on top.

    They said that the size of the gap between wallls was the most important bit and I ended up with losing about 120mm of 'floor' space.

    Rockslab is a denser version of loft insualtion and you cut it to size with a bread knife! I gather you can also get bags of granules you cut open and spread in between your floor joists.

    HTH
     
  8. RichardH

    RichardH
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    Rocslab - I think Wickes stock this, if it helps locate some (made by Rockwool) - they also stock the granules.
     
  9. Caveat

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    I know its obvious, but make sure there are no gaps between the rooms - projector leads etc. Dont forget upstairs with heating pipes too.
    A second layer of plasterboard could almost double the fire rating which might be reassuring too.
     
  10. Ripco

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    Mattresses and egg boxes.
     
  11. Gary Lightfoot

    Gary Lightfoot
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    For the ceiling, like others have said, pack in some decent rockwool like the 30mm high density stuff from Wickes, so that it fills the joists, then fit two layers of plasterboard to the ceiling. Make sure all joins are sealed, especialy at the edges.

    You could also use silicon rubber in the room above to seal all the gaps in the floor boards and round the edges where the skirting will go.

    Where air can go, so will sound, so sealing all air gaps between downstairs and upstairs will help.

    Using a good quality underlay upstairs will help too.

    This should go a long way to stopping sound traveling up, but there's not much you can do about vibrations. You may still get some bass vibes traveling up there.

    Adzman: considering you didn't know anything about soundproofing, you did a lot of things that are reccommended for soundproofing a room! What made you think of 4x2s and rockwool? The thick rubber underlay was a good idea, and two layers of plasterboard is almost the industry standard for soundproofing!

    Amazing... :)

    Gary.
     
  12. GavinBrowne

    GavinBrowne
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    Thanks to everyone who has offered advice. I will let you all know how it turns out.
     

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