Sony STR DN 1050 problem

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by martinarnold59, Jun 19, 2015.

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  1. martinarnold59

    martinarnold59
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    I have just set up this receiver and am impressed with the sound quality and features.

    When I plugged in my earphones into the socket and turned up the volume,the sound would only go up to what i would describe as normal conversation loudness , not what i want when watching a rock concert on Blu ray.

    The irony here is that without the earphones on , there is not limit to the volume or the offence that i can cause my neighbour.

    Google searches revealed the fact that Sony use AVLS which limits the volume on their Walkmans which can be turned off.

    I have written to Sony to ask how this can be done on their receiver,and was told that the AVLS was not installed on the receiver and only their Walkmans. They were not very forthcoming in respect of how this issue can be resolved.

    Does anybody know what if anything can be done to remove the noise limiter on this receiver?
     
  2. edd handforth

    edd handforth
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    I also have the same problem . just hope someone solves the problem . like you I found sony unhelfull to say the least
     
  3. dante01

    dante01
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    I'd suggest it an issue with the receiver's headphone amplification. It appears to be an issue with every STRDN1050. There's no resolution to the issue and Sony don't even appear to accept there is a problem? It is an issue often reported by users of the receiver.
     
  4. martinarnold59

    martinarnold59
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    I have resolved this problem now although having seen that other people have encountered the same problem , I have actually forgotten that I had a problem in the first place. It reminded me how annoyed that I was when I encountered the reality of the fact that the main headphone socket clearly has a volume limiter built in to it.
    I bought a NADS earphone amplifier which plugs into the Sony receiver by way of an optical outlet at the rear of the receiver. I am happier now as not only is the volume limiter a thing of the past , but if you listen to music a lot through the headphones , you will be amazed by the enhanced quality that this addition brings.
    The price tag will upset you but I have learnt that for 40 years now I have been listening to music through my headphones with 2nd rate quality. It seems that the main quality of all of my amplifiers and this Sony receiver is for the benefit of the main speakers and not the headphone socket.
    The NADS is designed solely for headphone use and the quality that it affords cannot be paralleled by what you get from the headphone outlet.
    I am currently researching buying a new Sony MP3 player and looking at the information available it is clear that Sony sell their top end players in Europe with volume limiters built in , to comply with EU law. I shall have to source my player when next abroad with one made for the non EU market.
    If this is true , it may explain why this receiver appears to have a limiter on its headphone outlet.
    If you get a NADS headphone amplifier you will not regret the investment.
     
  5. dante01

    dante01
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    The legislation governing the levels output by mobile devices doesn't cover hifi components and Sony do not limit the headphone output on any of their amplifiers. The issue is simply poor amplification not purposefully reduced output.

    The EU commission ruling (European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardisation (CENELEC)) only effects personal music players and mobile phones and not conventional headphone outputs found on amplifiers and other hifi components.

    The old rules
    Previous EU standards (pre 2013) prescribed that no maximum sound limit or any specific labelling be required in respect of volume levels but required that a statement be put in the instruction manual to warn of the adverse effects of exposure to excessive sound level.

    The new safety standards
    The ruling set by the European Commission's 27 Member States, covers all personal music players and mobile phones with a music playing function. It provides that:

    • Safe exposure levels shall be the "default" settings on products. The mandate does not prescribe specific technical solutions in order not to stifle the capacity of industry to innovate. Instead it requires manufactures to provide that the default settings for normal usage meet safety requirements.
    Safe use depends on exposure time and volume levels. At 80 dB, exposure should be limited to 40 hours/week. At 89 dB exposure should not exceed 5 hours/week.

    The safe exposure levels defined above shall be the default settings on products. Higher exposure levels can be permitted, provided that they have been intentionally selected by the user and the product incorporates a reliable means to inform the user of the risks.

    • Adequate warnings for consumers on the risks involved, and on ways to avoid them, including the situation when the original set of earphones is replaced with another type and this causes higher unsafe sound levels. The mandate is not prescriptive in terms of how this is done. Industry solutions could include for example – labels or digital information on the screen.


    Even these rules wouldn't result in the headphone output not being able to output audio at volumes higher than those being suggested the Sony receiver is being restricted to. It has nothing to do with the EU legislation covering the headphone output associated with personal music players.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2015

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