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Sony sound quailty

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Editing Forum' started by macwelshman, Sep 27, 2004.

  1. macwelshman

    macwelshman
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    I'm looking to purchase a new miniDV camera. I have a JVC at present which captures a lot of camera noise to tape and am looking for a camera that solves this problem.

    I've been looking at the Sony DCR-HC20E, but need to find out whether it has good sound reproduction before I buy. I have yet to find a decent review that comments on the sound quality.

    Are there any reviews I could read, or does anyone know if the sound quality is as good as I require?
     
  2. Roy Mallard

    Roy Mallard
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    Do you have a specific intended application?.

    On board mics are only really any use for general ambience, if you want decent sound you are going o have to mic off camera.

    The mic on all consumer camcorders is usually a cheap condenser unbalanced electret type, right next the to tape transport, right next to the zoom & focus motors and not isolated enough to remove handling noise.

    These mics usually work ok in open spaces, but if you are working next to a wall or in a reverberant room (where echoes are prone to occuring) you are going to be hard pushed to avoid any camcorder noise on tape.

    The cameras you mention have no manual audio record level control, so when it is quiet the camera boosts audio gain until it finds a sound to set an auto level off of. In an enclosed space this is usually the noise of the camcorder itself.

    The solution: if you want decent sound, you'll have to spend proper money I'm afraid, the canon MVX250, pansonic GS400 and sony HC1000 all offer audio record level overides.

    An isolated mic starts from around £150, or yu can get interview mics (tieclips) from around £20 which will vastly improve the audio quality (much closer to the subject, no handling noise, far elss effects of reverberation).

    There is a tendancy for videographers to neglect audio, you obviously don't think this way, but to do it right you will need to spend more money I'm afraid.
     
  3. macwelshman

    macwelshman
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    Thanks for your comments, but I have a limited budget and use the camera for family stuff only (I can't justify the expense). I have read some reviews for other makes and models in the £400 price range that refer to minimal noise pick up. If the Sony DCR-HC20E has low camera noise pick up too then I would probably go for it - but this is the information that I don't have.
     
  4. Roy Mallard

    Roy Mallard
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    All inbuilt mics are pretty ropey, feedback ends to be that canon MV's are the worst offenders.
     
  5. Kevo

    Kevo
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    Why has there been no improvement in ob mics with camcorders since the 'early days' ?

    Pic quality has always progressed over the years and is now even better than 'DVD Quality', yet the sound quality despite it being recorded better on the tape (less hiss, if nothing else!) is still the same old crappy, fluctuating levels 'noise'!
     
  6. Roy Mallard

    Roy Mallard
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    fluctuating levels: that's auto for you. The cam tries to make everything consistant but it doesn't know whether you are recording baby's first words or The Darkness live at Glastonbury.

    Mic technology has not really moved on as quickly as ccd technology.

    It goes back to my previous post, if you want professional results you have to learn how sound works, what mics to use for each application and to have a decent cam with manual record levels.

    Most consumer level people don't want the hassle.


    To put it in context, my Sennheiser 416 with rycote isolator and windjammer retails at around £800, for a mono mic and it'll only work for certain applications.

    Thats 2 HC20's.

    I'm not suggesting that everybody go to that hassle and expense for their home movies, but cost has to be considered, minidv cams are superb value these days, but if you want the best results you have to put the work in.
     

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