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Sony Receiver calibration help

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Buying & Building' started by ninRG, Mar 18, 2003.

  1. ninRG

    ninRG
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    Hi,

    I have read various posts about using a sound level meter to calibrate the speaker volumes correctly to Dolby Reference.

    My problem is that while I can adjust the centre and rear volumes to match the front two, I cannot seem to change the front speaker levels (just the balance).

    How can I calibrate the speaker levels to Dolby ref levels, or is this not possible? Sony DB780.

    Cheers

    Nin_RG
     
  2. EvilMudge

    EvilMudge
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    You're best bet is to forget about reference level and set up all the speakers to match a level that you normally listen to the system. There are benefits from doing it this way rather than calibrating to reference, because the behaviour of your speakers may not be the same at lower volumes (certain types of speaker can change their relative level if the main volume is lower than the calibration point.)
     
  3. Demon

    Demon
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    How about something like the following procedure

    1. Set Front Speakers to give 80db (or whatever your reference level is). This will involve using the main volume control, and the balance to get 80db from both fronts.

    2. Now using the centre level adjsutment, set the centre to be 80sb (or whatever ref level you are using)

    3. And do the same for the rears....

    The key here is that you are using the main volume, and balance to set the fronts, but the amps centre/rear level adjust to the other channels...

    Or is that a load of rubbish?????
     
  4. ninRG

    ninRG
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    Cheers Guys,

    Volume levels are all set up pretty good and I am happy with the setup.

    I just don't understand why the receiver would show the volume
    in db below a certain level, when you can't setup the system to make this level meaningful.

    My understanding of the convention is that if I am watching a film and the volume is at -40db then this is 40db below what the director\dolby intended.

    Ok this is no highend receiver and I am just fussing over detail, but thats me.

    Mark
     
  5. EvilMudge

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    You've encountered the curse of Sony, their receivers count backwards from maximum output, for reasons only understood by those with a firm grasp of the Japanese engineering culture.

    Personally I think that all amplifiers should go up to 11.:D
     
  6. micb3rd

    micb3rd
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    I have my setup calibrated to Dolby Reference but I listen at arroud -20 for movies as this is quite loud enough for me.



    Home Theater Calibration and volume controls.

    Why do we calibrate our home theaters? we do this so we can get a balance between the level of speech and all the effects out of the individual speakers

    AV Receivers have a DB counter.

    Having a db counter on an AV receiver is for calibration and balencing to Dolby reference, this is acheived buy using a SPL meter (most commonly the Radioshack one) and special test tones.

    The test tones are pink noise recorded at a lower level than full reference, the reason the tones are recorded at a lower level is so you can balance you Home theater with out going deaf in the process.

    The tones are recorded at -20db below reference for an AVIA DVD and -30 db below reference for internal tones from an AV Receiver.

    Both tones from a DVD or internal amplifier can be used they give the same results.

    The AV Receiver it set to 00 and the tone is played through each channel, you then balance all speaker channels levels to 75 db using the channel volume on the amplifier.

    1)The point of putting the amp on 0 and calibrating is then you can play movies at -10 and be 10 db below dolby reference level or play at -40 and be 40db below dolby reference.

    2)Full dolby reference is usualy peaks of 105db per channel and 115db for LFE (bass).

    IF you use bass management and run speakers set to small then the LFE and sound below 80hz is passed to the subwoofer, the peak bass level is bumped up from 115 to 121 db.

    Full dolby reference is very loud and can be damaging to you AV kit.
     
  7. ninRG

    ninRG
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    You say you have calibrated your system. Does that mean your receiver allows you to alter the level of the front left and right speakers, aswell as the center and surrounds?

    THis is my problem. I can only adjust the center, Surrounds and LFE.
     
  8. micb3rd

    micb3rd
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    Yes my AV Receiver can set the channel levels individually.

    I see your problem now, hmmmm does the Receiver have a test/calibrate button on the remote?

    If you want to calibrate you could use a DVD calibration disk like AVIA by bringing the receiver volume up so the reference tones on the disk are playing at 85db in the SPL meter and then you could match the other channels to 85 in line with the fronts. Then that number on your reciever would then be your reference level.
     

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