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sony NW-HD5 18.6 gb not 20gb

Discussion in 'Headphones, Earphones & Portable Music' started by DELLAMORTE, Aug 22, 2005.

  1. DELLAMORTE

    DELLAMORTE
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    Hi can any one please help my hard drive on my nw-hd5 is 18.6gb not 20gb is that the norm :lease:
     
  2. szsiddiq1214

    szsiddiq1214
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    yea, thats the norm, all of the ones out on the market are like that, and if u read the fine print itll tell u that thats the case...the space is taken up by the software on the player and such
     
  3. DELLAMORTE

    DELLAMORTE
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    cheers mate many thanks :thumbsup:
     
  4. David Mackenzie

    David Mackenzie
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    It's actually because hard drives are measured in "marketing space" instead of actual space. I think every drive is very slightly different, some will come out as 18.6gb, others 18.5 and such. So instead of the confusion, the manufacturers cheat and round the figure up.
     
  5. DantheMan

    DantheMan
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    Yeah 1000 Mb does not equal 1GB, also all hard drives once formatted go to their actual size.
     
  6. johann1979

    johann1979
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    Yeah it is definitely not the firmware! Firmware would be kept on a seperate chip and not on the HD - besides, the firmware would never be 1.5GB!

    Lyris is right, it has to do with how it is calculated :)
     
  7. s-p

    s-p
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    Just in case you wanted the calculation:

    20GB quoted by hard drive manufacturers equates to:

    20000000000 bytes

    However, if you were to convert these bytes into gigabytes correctly working on the understanding that there are 1024 bytes per KB, 1024KB per MB and 1024MB per GB, then you would obtain the following:

    20000000000 / 1024 / 1024 / 1024 = 18.63GB

    Then of course you allow room for firmware etc... and you come to the total space available for music. Unfortunately its the way ALL companies display hard drive values.
     
  8. KeanosMagicHat

    KeanosMagicHat
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    And it's a con which is currently being challenged in Europe.
     
  9. Steven

    Steven
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    Its due to two diff ways of calculating what an "mb" is; 1000 kb or 1024 kb. Why??? Dunno. The industry puzzles me sometimes
     
  10. SeaneyC

    SeaneyC
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    Because common sense would say 1000 = 1K and 1000K = 1M, however, there's no way to get 1000 in a full binary expression, so you might as well use 1024 as it's "close enough" and much easier to use in binary (which of course all things digital are)
     
  11. HMHB

    HMHB
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    It's all about bytes and the binary sequence 1,2,4,8,16,32,64,128,256,512,1024 - with 1024 being the number of bytes in a Kb. If you work in base 10 then the "column headings" are units, tens, hundreds, thousands etc - in binary they are units, twos, fours, eights, sixteens, thirty twos etc etc following the sequence above. Thats why memory has always come in those units.
    That's the simple explanation so as it's always been the case I don't see it as a con really, more like not explaining to the public what they mean by 20GB :)
     
  12. cheshire_carper

    cheshire_carper
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    2 to the power of 10.
     

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