SONY/MGM:no immediate plans to implement ICT

criggy

Active Member
sorry to reply to my own post.

i'm suprised no one has welcomed this news:confused:

in the "COMFIRMED:blu-ray/hddvd it's HDMI or nothing" thread people where up in arms about it...........again:confused:

i guess people really ain't bothered about ICT after all.
 

Noggin1980

Well-known Member
criggy said:
sorry to reply to my own post.

i'm suprised no one has welcomed this news:confused:

in the "COMFIRMED:blu-ray/hddvd it's HDMI or nothing" thread people where up in arms about it...........again:confused:

i guess people really ain't bothered about ICT after all.
Probably because it needs to be everyone or who cares?. Would you buy a player if you had no hdmi if you could only play sony blu-ray discs? Since its members of the blu-ray camp like fox who have pushed for even worse copy protection than provided by aacs it seems a safe bet they will be useing the ICT tags.

If we hear none of the studios are useing it then its time to celebrate.

Edit- and whats no immediate plans about too? either you are going to use it or your not period. Imagine the fury if they realease with no ICT tags. You buy a player and 6 months later they decide to implement them. You then won't be able to play any new discs on your $1000 player or you have to buy a new TV.

Its an encourageing start but they need to do more than this.
 

laser

Active Member
criggy said:
sorry to reply to my own post.

i'm suprised no one has welcomed this news:confused:

in the "COMFIRMED:blu-ray/hddvd it's HDMI or nothing" thread people where up in arms about it...........again:confused:

i guess people really ain't bothered about ICT after all.
I think it is good news. I also read in Home Cinema Choice this month that Fox do not want ICT implemented as they believe it would damage the number of early adopters for the new format.

I for one have a 2.5 year old plasma without HDMI. It will accept HD via component and is 1024x768 pixels so 720p footage should at least look decentish...

I have no intention of upgrading my plasma at the present time as I would like to buy either a 1080x1024 native resolution plasma or LCD in the next year when prices have reduced and there are more 1080 native resolution sets around. However I would like to enjoythe benefits of HD now, esepcially as HD-DVD is reletively cheap for a new format. If ICT is switched on then I won't buy a high-def DVD player until I get a new plasma or LCD capable of 1080 native resolution. If ICT is switched off I'd be prepared to part with £400 to try out the new format now and start buying hi-def DVD's.

For me its as simple as that. They'll get an extra sale if there is no ICT.

A couple of years down the road when most people have bought their first HDMI capable hi-def TV or like me, replacing an old plasma or LCD, then the ICT issue will be much less of an issue when we are all using HDMI or DVI. At the moment there are far more plasmas and LCD TVs without HDMI than those with. So hopefully common sense will prevail and ICT will be switched off for a year or two till the format matures and people have chance to replace hardware which is HDMI(HDCP) compatible.
 

Noggin1980

Well-known Member
I also read in Home Cinema Choice this month that Fox do not want ICT implemented as they believe it would damage the number of early adopters for the new format.
Well I agree with them but now I'm really confused. I was under the impression that fox were one of the main reasons that things had been delayed due to them wanting more and stronger copy protection, I was under the impression they had gone blu-ray because of the BD+ copy protection and that aacs wasn't strong enough for them.

Now they are choseing to allow high def over component? That means no hdcp protection and all the months of worry and talk over the content protection was useless?

am I getting confused here? If all the blu-ray studios chose not to use ICT and allow high def over component then I'll certainly change my tune over blu-ray and would be happy with them winning.

If Fox has had a change of heart like this is it because of the public outcry over the copy protection? have they finally woken up and smelt the coffee or am I misunderstanding? Has the consumer won?
 

Grubert

Active Member
Noggin1980 said:
Well I agree with them but now I'm really confused. I was under the impression that fox were one of the main reasons that things had been delayed due to them wanting more and stronger copy protection, I was under the impression they had gone blu-ray because of the BD+ copy protection and that aacs wasn't strong enough for them.

Now they are choseing to allow high def over component? That means no hdcp protection and all the months of worry and talk over the content protection was useless?

am I getting confused here? If all the blu-ray studios chose not to use ICT and allow high def over component then I'll certainly change my tune over blu-ray and would be happy with them winning.

If Fox has had a change of heart like this is it because of the public outcry over the copy protection? have they finally woken up and smelt the coffee or am I misunderstanding? Has the consumer won?
Fox is concerned about protection of the digital signal path. BD+ gives them additional security - something like a second lock in case someone picks the first.

On the other hand, ICT affects the analog signal, which doesn't seem to be critical for them.

It makes perfect sense.
 

Noggin1980

Well-known Member
Thanks (great for the consumer whatever the reason though, it certainly warms me a great deal towards buying a HD-DVD or bluray player when they first hit europe)

Interestingly it looks like this may be the reason for no ICT tags

Posted by Roughneck1 in the movie forum of this site. Emphasis mine

Four film studios have announced that they will not activate the "down resolution" flag option on their first Blu-ray and HD-DVD discs.
Subject of a recent column (which provoked much irate reader mail), that scheme would have diminished the quality of the pictures delivered through the nonsecured, analog component outputs of the player, while reserving the highest-grade picture for the latest-generation HDTVs with digitally "secured" HDMI inputs.

What really persuaded Sony, Disney, Fox and Paramount to back away from down rezzing was an ultimatum put out by developers of the AACS copy protection technology, adopted by both high-def disc systems.
The Advanced Access Content System gang has demanded that any discs with a down-rez flag carry a warning label on the package, sure to confuse and put off buyers.
It still has the horrible "on their first...discs" part though.
 

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