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SONY KV32FQ75 PROBLEMS /4:3 TVs BETTER THAN WIDESCREEN TVs?

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by Steve Thackery, Aug 21, 2001.

  1. Steve Thackery

    Steve Thackery
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    The faint black lines: I wonder if you are referring to the two horizontal lines you can see one third and two thirds of the way down the screen. If so, they are inherent to all Trinitron tubes. If you're talking about something else, I'm stumped.

    The red outline you mention (if it's only on one side of the lettering or whatever you're looking at) is a classical symptom of misconvergence, and a normal tubed TV is just as prone as a rear projector. Most TVs provide adjustment of the convergence (although it will be hidden in the service menu, and perhaps even done by an internal adjustment). However, it is often difficult to get the convergence perfect over the whole screen.

    I do recommend that you adjust it if you can. On the production line they'll get a quick tweak to get them somewhere near ("within spec") and it's on to the next one. At home you can spend ages fiddling until it's just perfect.

    This is also true of geometry problems. As with convergence, the TV is *designed* to have correct geometry, but may well need proper setting up to achieve it. And as with convergence, to do it properly can take ages.

    You need to get a tame, and GOOD, TV engineer who's prepared to sit in your home for a good hour or so until it's just right. That doesn't include the technicians from a mail order house, unfortunately!

    Steve Thackery
     
  2. mrsingh

    mrsingh
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    I've just returned my second Sony KV32FQ75 to Empire Direct as it was displaying the same problems as the first set:

    1) Lack of sharpness on far left-hand side of screen.

    2) Faint black horizontal lines on the AV channels (although I realise that this might be inherent on all Sony Trinitron Wegas).

    3) Red outlines on some images which looks similar to convergence problems on rear-projection sets.

    4) Geometry problems.

    After having read some brilliant reviews for this TV's picture, I was a bit dissappointed. I was sitting about 1.5m away from the screen and watching DVDs via an RGB connection. Only the very best DVDs (like Gladiator) looked halfway decent on this set. Even then the pictures looked a bit too processed (and this was in DRC50 mode).

    Empire Direct will have engineers will have their engineers look at the set and if they confirm the problems, they will allow me to exchange it for a different model.

    I was thinking of going for a 4:3 set this time. Having briefly owned widescreen models such as the Sony KV36FS70, Sony KV32FQ75 and Toshiba 40 inch rear-projection set (I can't remember the model number), I've always found that large 4:3 TVs with 16:9 mode display a clearer DVD anamoprhic picture than widescreen sets.
     
  3. Guest

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    I'm surprised that trinitron tubes still feature that slight horizontal line problem that you mentioned. I once bought a second hand sony 4:3 set many many years ago but sold it on again after a week or so because of those irritating black lines. I read somewhere that they are a safety feature of the trinitron tube but even so I simply couldn't live with them. Do all sony sets still have them I wonder? Guess I'll be looking for a Panny or Tosh in future.

    Widescreen or 4:3.... 'What you gain in width you lose in height.'

    [ 22-08-2001: Message edited by: Paul G ]</p>
     
  4. Mr.D

    Mr.D
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    All trinitron type tubes have these lines. They are a consequence of aperture grill technology ( as opposes to shadowmasks/dotmasks on other types of tube). They are support wires to hold the grill in place and are very necessary.

    You will find them on other makes of TV that utilise trinitron type tubes (mitsubishi diamondtron for example) and the vast majority of decent computer monitors.

    Most tubes have at least two the larger tubes tend to have three.
     
  5. Banjaxe

    Banjaxe
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    I currently own a 33" Toshiba 4:3 TV and I get what I think is an excellent anamporphic picture from DVDs in 16:9 mode.

    If I measure the visible screen size in 16:9 mode it's only about an inch smaller diagonally than a real 32" widescreen set, but when I'm watching 4:3 material I get a much larger picture than I would even with a 36" widescreen.

    I've been looking for a new TV for quite a while but I really haven't seen much justification for changing. None of the sets I've seen seem to offer much (if any) kind of improvement over the picture quality I get with a 3 year old bog standard 4:3 50Hz bit of kit.

    It really seems that for the past few years manufacturers have concentrated purely on feature count (completely flat screens, 100Hz processing, etc.) and really haven't managed to improve picture performance very much.
     

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