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Sony KL 50W RPTV

Discussion in 'TVs' started by Les, Jan 3, 2005.

  1. Les

    Les
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    Hi

    I have had the TV for about 8 years or so, and it has been very very good. It is now beginning to show its age, and has developed some slight discolourations in the picture, only a few. These are like smalish purple blotches which show up only on light couloured backgrounds like sky or such. A friend who knows more about these things tells me that it is very likely just dirt/dust on the optics/mirror on the inside of the set, and suggests that it would be easy for me to clean these myself.

    Question: would I be taking on a difficult task in attempting to open up and clean these items myself? Would I likely do more damage than good ny trying it myself? If it would be hard for me to do, would it be a costly thing to have a service place do it for me?

    The picture, ignoring these blotches, is still very very good so I would like to try and get it back to 'normal' if possible.

    Any one had this type of thing before?
     
  2. LV426

    LV426
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    It's fairly typical of LCD projectors (and this is what you have) for dust particles to lodge on the LCDs and cause the effect you describe. And they can be cleaned. The mirror and screen are probably due for a clean, too.

    Although you could do it yourself, you may prefer to have a service centre do it. In which case - a word of warning; tread very carefully. These sets were somewhat enigmatic and many places purporting to be Sony service centres have not got the first idea where to start. Such places can quickly do more harm than good, at your expense of course. So choose very carefully.

    Otherwise, the LCD block is near the front of the set, dead centre, below the screen. After taking the top assembly off, look for the projector lens and then right below that are your LCDs. Get a can of compressed air (eg from Maplin) and blow.
     
  3. Les

    Les
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    Thanks Nigel. Your words of caution are very clear to me. I have had past experiences similar to what you say.

    Is it simply the removal of the 'back' cover that will give me access to the LCD's/lens area (and mirror(s) too)?

    From what you say, I will probably give it a go myself. I am pretty handy, but lack the knowledge here. I am able to judge what I should/shouldn't do on the fly so to speak.

    I take it that using anything other an air blast would not be advised - is this from the point of view of putting things out of alignment?

    When you mention the screen needing cleaned - are you meaning the inside surface? Is that also easy to get at when the 'back' is removed? I've only ever cleaned the outside surface with a little furry brush thing that came with the set.
     
  4. LV426

    LV426
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    If I recall correctly (and it is some time since I saw one of these dismantled) the entire top piece comes off - i.e. from the bottom of the screen, above the speakers and controls, upwards. That gives you access to the "works" (in the remaining bottom bit of the set) and to the mirror (only one) and inside of the screen (in the top piece). The top piece is mostly empty space.

    Don't use anything except compressed air. And make sure (by trying it on an ordinary mirror, first) that it's totally free of residue. Use the same mirror to practice your spraying technique.
     

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