Answered Sony HDR-SR11E Time to upgrade

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Making Forum' started by Nick_H, Jun 29, 2015.

  1. Nick_H

    Nick_H
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    Been very happy with my SR11 for day to day video needs and it's still a mint example going strong.. However a couple of things let it down...

    I do enjoy videoing high speed subjects. Anything from about 180kts to above 600kts !

    The old Sony struggles here although it does a good job considering the tech. My old analogue TRV-22e which was a £1500 camera in it's day did a better job...

    So... The question is how are things now 7 years later ?

    Is it worth an upgrade or shall I stick with the old Sony to the end ?
     
  2. Best Answer:
    Post #2 by rogs, Jun 29, 2015 (1 points)
  3. rogs

    rogs
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    Best Answer
    That's a very good question!....
    The marketplace for consumer camcorders is not what it was, with the huge increase in the popularity of phone cameras and the like for everyday 'family' videos.
    As a result, the manufacturers strive to find ever more ingenious ways of adding 'bells and whistles' to make the specs look good, while needing to keeping the cost down. Many modern consumer camcorders are, for the most part, less well constructed than their equivalents used to be... IMHO of course!

    The reason your old camera performed better than your newer one for high speed motion footage was almost certainly due to the fact that it used a CCD sensor rather than the CMOS type used in your newer camcorder. (Virtually all current models use CMOS sensors)
    CCD sensors use a global shutter. CMOS use a rolling shutter. If you google 'rolling shutter' you will find dozens of items dealing with the problems these can cause with high motion footage. Some camcorders are better than others, and rolling shutter artifacts don't seem to cause much trouble with 'normal' family type video.

    But as you mentioned high speed subjects, I think you may be disappointed with the results from most modern camcorders.

    There are camcorders now arriving on the scene with CMOS sensors fitted with global shutters, but these are currently pretty expensive, and rare so far.

    I'm a great fan of CCD sensors for high speed shooting, and I'm still very tempted to go for one of the last prosumer Panasonic camcorders that used a CCD - the AG HMC 151. They go for about £1000 second hand.. which is quite lot for a 5 year old camcorder.
    That means of course that there are still quite lot of folk who like using global shuttered sensors....
     
  4. Nick_H

    Nick_H
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    Thanks rogs superb reply :) Well I'll stick with the 11e then and post again in a couple of years. Hopefully something will have turned up by then. Again many thanks for an excellent reply !
     
  5. 12harry

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    Hi, it would be useful if you said "what" you're filming... and I don't understand (you said)- "180kts"

    The camcorder Market is going for 4K ( nominally 4x better than HD we see on TV ), and as rogs says there are specialist cameras . . . maybe look for a GoPro (= small Action cameras). which can operate in a high-framerate mode. They start from about £100 but you probably need one of the more recent models.
    GoPros aren't quite as easy to use as a conventional camcorder, but have many interesting "modes" whilst being rugged, and waterproof in their clear housing. The have a fixed wideangle lens.

    Hope that helps, too.
     
  6. rogs

    rogs
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    With a range of '180 - 600kts' I'm guessing aircraft filming of some sort Harry....
    (180 - 600kts is a bit bloody quick for a boat :)... and what else uses 'knots'?)

    Which also may mean filming spinning propellers...... and rolling shutters and propellers are not usually a good combination. (Often comical results)

    You can improve things a bit by slowing down the shutter speed, but with automatic cameras like the Go Pro that means adding ND filters. This video shows some typical results......

    That just makes the props almost disappear though. To make them blur 'nicely' as the naked eye sees them, you really need a CCD sensor...or a CMOS sensor with a global shutter (still pretty rare)

    As I say, CMOS sensors with rollng shutters can come as a backward step for certain types of specialised shooting..... like filming aircraft, for example.....
     
  7. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    A boy scout :D
     
  8. rogs

    rogs
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    So --- a 500 mph boy scout then......(there's got to be a joke in there somewhere! :) )
     

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