Question Some advice required for first time projector & screen home cinema

flashp

Active Member
Hi all, I'd like to tap some experienced owners for some advice on setting myself up with a projector and screen. I've some idea of what I want to avoid and what my end goals might be but not much idea of what to avoid in terms or hardware or what I should be going for.

Here's a sketch of the installation room with the windows highlighted:

IMG_20191006_150153__01__01.jpg


I'd like a screen that remains flat, ideally ceiling suspended and manual raise/lower. It'd be ideal if the projector could be mounted mid way up the back wall and have a quiet fan. Not ruling out short throw closer to the screen. Curly screen edges and ripples will irritate me...a lot. I recognise the value of a decent screen and would like to make sure I get this right for the long term.

All my source material is 1080, not too worried (at least I think I don't need to be) about 4k. I'm thinking doing 1080 well is better for me than doing an average job on 4k upscaling, especially so since I don't have any 4k media or sources.

The room can have the light level dropped but not blacked out during the day, standard lined curtains. The room is east facing and only sees direct sunlight briefly early in the morning.

I'd like good blacks, movement handled well and decent sharpness.

Budget is £1500 max, if it can be done cheaper then all the better. I suspect there's a sweet spot beyond which there'll be diminishing returns for the investment, not sure where that is or if it's actually beyond my budget.

I may have missed some important considerations, that's why I'm asking. :thumbsup:

Cheers,

Ashley.
 

noob0101

Member
Projector wise, one with the correct throw range is required. With screen of 106" (16:9) the width is 234.7 cm. Any throw range longer than x1.45 is not usable.

There are lots of budget 1080p projectors available. Most projectors in this price category are about the same size, so not a lot of room to dampen the noise, and as a result are not great on being quiet.
The Benq W1120 is one of the most recommended. It's relatively quiet, probably the best in the sub $1500 category.
It does have a color wheel, and some people are susceptible to the rainbow effect (RBE). If you've never seen a projector with a color wheel, make sure the store has a good return policy.

If you do see rainbows than a LCD type projector is recommended. The Epson TW 650 is about the cheapest available, with the TW 6700 being a higher end. Epson does plan to launch a new 4k line up, but the cheapest is just over $1K.

4K are at a minimum $1K, but users are reporting some improvement with 1080p upscaled to 4K.

Use this site to check projector/screen calculations:
The 2050A is the US name of the W1120.

Light from blinds will wash out the picture, so best to get some opaque drapes.

For a drop down screen not to develop waves it needs to be tensioned, which are more expensive.
In your setup, why not use a fixed screen mounted on the wall where it says 1.68?
Or put the speakers in that space and use a acoustically transparent screen (fixed), and mount it so it's a continuation of the black wall (?) that the front left speaker touches. It would be a larger diagonal. There is probably a way to mount a fixed screen on the two walls, or some other method. A fixed screen would be cheaper than a drop down tensioned one.
 
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flashp

Active Member
Projector wise, one with the correct throw range is required. With screen of 106" (16:9) the width is 234.7 cm. Any throw range longer than x1.45 is not usable.

There are lots of budget 1080p projectors available. Most projectors in this price category are about the same size, so not a lot of room to dampen the noise, and as a result are not great on being quiet.
The Benq W1120 is one of the most recommended. It's relatively quiet, probably the best in the sub $1500 category.
It does have a color wheel, and some people are susceptible to the rainbow effect (RBE). If you've never seen a projector with a color wheel, make sure the store has a good return policy.

If you do see rainbows than a LCD type projector is recommended. The Epson TW 650 is about the cheapest available, with the TW 6700 being a higher end. Epson does plan to launch a new 4k line up, but the cheapest is just over $1K.

4K are at a minimum $1K, but users are reporting some improvement with 1080p upscaled to 4K.

Use this site to check projector/screen calculations:
The 2050A is the US name of the W1120.

Light from blinds will wash out the picture, so best to get some opaque drapes.

For a drop down screen not to develop waves it needs to be tensioned, which are more expensive.
In your setup, why not use a fixed screen mounted on the wall where it says 1.68?
Or put the speakers in that space and use a acoustically transparent screen (fixed), and mount it so it's a continuation of the black wall (?) that the front left speaker touches. It would be a larger diagonal. There is probably a way to mount a fixed screen on the two walls, or some other method. A fixed screen would be cheaper than a drop down tensioned one.
Thanks for your reply, it's appreciated. There was some key information missing regarding the wall marked 1.68 and that it that there's a wood burning stove on that wall.

I have been made aware of these as an option for a screen, it's one that requires assembly prior to use.
 

noob0101

Member
Thanks for your reply, it's appreciated. There was some key information missing regarding the wall marked 1.68 and that it that there's a wood burning stove on that wall.

I have been made aware of these as an option for a screen, it's one that requires assembly prior to use.
I don't know how wise it is to have a screen next to heat source such as a stove. If it's in operation at the same time as the screen is dropped down it could cause deformations in the screen.
 

flashp

Active Member
I don't know how wise it is to have a screen next to heat source such as a stove. If it's in operation at the same time as the screen is dropped down it could cause deformations in the screen.
This is about what I thought. I'm even nervous about having one not in use rolled up in it's case on the ceiling. I'd more or less written off using the stove with a screen out.
 

rjg

Member
Not sure where the door is.... would it possible to have a screen coming down over the bay window area? This serves to provide a lot more light blocking than curtains alone.
 
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