(SOLVED/ FOUND) Help choosing paint for home cinema - how much does a pure a shade/ grey matter? Trying to fine a pure dark grey

fallinlight

Distinguished Member
How does the Flints compare to dulux blacks?

Out of interest where in London are you?

The closest comparison I had was RAL 9005, the darkest black I could find apart from the Flints. I originally painted my door in the 9005 in Dulux Diamond eggshell, but I absolutely hated the finish. It looked plasticky and tacky. I re-did it in the Flints, which as you can see, looks superb. The 9005 was darker than the Flints. But I don't know how it looks in flat matt. From my experience, the Flints needs a primer beforehand, it seems like cheap paint to me - the best I tested of them all was Little Greene and I originally wanted to go with them for the dark grey I had in mind initially, but they wouldn't mix big pots of the shade I wanted.

Regardless, you are likely to encounter painting in any black very difficult to near impossible to get an even/ perfect finish. It must just be the nature of the pigment/ black in paint.

Understood. I'd actually think the side walls and ceiling close to the screen are more important than the screen-wall itself.

@Triggaaar, @Smurfin, I've noticed a major improvement going from a white projection wall to screen against black flock. There is zero light, everything is absorbed. It's just an image floating in space. With the flock that I have done, the remaining Flints on the wall is just a distraction. I'm finishing the entire room in flock, anyway.

Out of interest where in London are you?

South West.
 

fallinlight

Distinguished Member
Is it self adhesive flock that you've used? Is it easy to cut out around spots?

 

fallinlight

Distinguished Member
Is it self adhesive flock that you've used? Is it easy to cut out around spots?

Yes. And yes, for the most part, it depends on your space and approach. I took the challenge and goal of applying the flock around my light switches and power sockets in one piece trimming to fit around the sockets. That required skill and more time. My tools of choice for cutting were a fabric scissor, cross stitch/ craft clipper and Stanley knife.

The guide above has almost everything you would need to help you. But the best way is learning on the job through trial and error.
 

AndreNewman

Active Member
I just stumbled on this thread and no-one seems to have found the grey paints that grading houses use to paint their walls, maybe it's useful to someone.
This is the reference paint, Munsell neutral grey paint, N5, N7, N8, completely D65, expensive.

The more budget conscious places use these standard Dulux colours, also completely D65.
The Dulux trade Grey steel 1,2,3 &4 are all completely D65, you can see the values on the e-paint site. Beware of RAL Steel Grey not quite D65, deceptively similar name.

Dulux trade 00NN 05/000 Night jewels aka Rich Black, darkest D65 black outside of Roscoe TV etc.
Dulux trade 00NN 31/000 Grey Steel 1 aka Deep Fossil, darkest grey
Dulux trade 00NN 53/000 Grey Steel 2 aka Chic Shadow
Dulux trade 00NN 72/000 Grey Steel 3 aka Polished Pebble
Dulux trade 00NN 83/000 Grey Steel 4 aka Indian White

Beware of the aka fancy names, exact same paint at 3 or 4 times the cost, looks like you guys found that bit out already. :cool:

I painted a Grey Steel 2 screen for my old DLP many years ago, it calibrated perfectly, much better than the screen mixes suggested on other forums. I wasted a lot of time on paint mixing before I found these on an work forum about decorating edit suites and grading rooms.

I helped calibrate a Grey Steel 4 screen wall at the weekend, calibrated perfectly.
 

fallinlight

Distinguished Member
I just stumbled on this thread and no-one seems to have found the grey paints that grading houses use to paint their walls, maybe it's useful to someone.
This is the reference paint, Munsell neutral grey paint, N5, N7, N8, completely D65, expensive.

The more budget conscious places use these standard Dulux colours, also completely D65.
The Dulux trade Grey steel 1,2,3 &4 are all completely D65, you can see the values on the e-paint site. Beware of RAL Steel Grey not quite D65, deceptively similar name.

Dulux trade 00NN 05/000 Night jewels aka Rich Black, darkest D65 black outside of Roscoe TV etc.
Dulux trade 00NN 31/000 Grey Steel 1 aka Deep Fossil, darkest grey
Dulux trade 00NN 53/000 Grey Steel 2 aka Chic Shadow
Dulux trade 00NN 72/000 Grey Steel 3 aka Polished Pebble
Dulux trade 00NN 83/000 Grey Steel 4 aka Indian White

Beware of the aka fancy names, exact same paint at 3 or 4 times the cost, looks like you guys found that bit out already. :cool:

I painted a Grey Steel 2 screen for my old DLP many years ago, it calibrated perfectly, much better than the screen mixes suggested on other forums. I wasted a lot of time on paint mixing before I found these on an work forum about decorating edit suites and grading rooms.

I helped calibrate a Grey Steel 4 screen wall at the weekend, calibrated perfectly.

Good work, @AndreNewman. RAL 9005 was the darkest black that I found and used, then the Flints. I did my door originally in 9005, Dulux Trade Diamond eggshell, but hated the finish, so re-did it in the Flints. I then started covering everything in black flock, minus my radiator, which I did in RAL 9005, Zinsser AllCoat. The Zinsser isn't as black as the Dulux Trade Diamond eggshell in RAL 9005. So, worth noting that different brands and finishes can or will often yield different shades. I did try a grey by Tikkurila, forget which one now, but it was too light for my liking and not an exact match - brighter - to the sample tin I tried. I then went over all the walls in Flints. And now as above, in the process of covering the rest of my walls in black flock.
 

AndreNewman

Active Member
I found that anything other than lots of thin coats of flat matt emulsion reflects horribly and in bizarre unexpected ways. Flat Matt Emulsion is the closest to lambertian, I've seen, better than a lot of screen fabrics.

I love that the e-paints website allows you to compare L a b values for off the shelf paint :cool:

I found all this stuff years and years ago, it came up again recently as a friend was deciding how to paint his new cinema room. We were trying to find the whitest white flat matt that was actually D65 white not Daz or OMO blue white! This thread came up in the searches.
 

fallinlight

Distinguished Member
I found that anything other than lots of thin coats of flat matt emulsion reflects horribly and in bizarre unexpected ways. Flat Matt Emulsion is the closest to lambertian, I've seen, better than a lot of screen fabrics.

I love that the e-paints website allows you to compare L a b values for off the shelf paint :cool:

I found all this stuff years and years ago, it came up again recently as a friend was deciding how to paint his new cinema room. We were trying to find the whitest white flat matt that was actually D65 white not Daz or OMO blue white! This thread came up in the searches.

A nice flat/ matt paint works well indeed. The Flints works well and has a very low reflectance, but it and any paint just doesn't cut it compared to fabric. I understand that the finer the paint or application, such as if sprayed, will make it more reflective. I was told that the composition of fabric itself is also what helps it work so well. In my journey, I also learned that dark red is the best colour after a neutral grey or black, since red fades quickest in the dark, to our eyes. Whilst green works in the opposite way, which is why it is used for night vision.
 

AndreNewman

Active Member
A nice flat/ matt paint works well indeed. The Flints works well and has a very low reflectance, but it and any paint just doesn't cut it compared to fabric.
I know, we have lots of Whaleys devore instead of black paint :)


I understand that the finer the paint or application, such as if sprayed, will make it more reflective.
Really I didn't know that. I thought sprayed gave a flatter finish than roller or pad so maybe that's why. I never bothered with spraying, the finish with careful rollering was plenty good enough for me, maybe I dodged a bullet on that one...

I was told that the composition of fabric itself is also what helps it work so well. In my journey, I also learned that dark red is the best colour after a neutral grey or black,
Hence old school Cinema decor and photography dark room "lights".

since red fades quickest in the dark, to our eyes. Whilst green works in the opposite way, which is why it is used for night vision.
That's new to me, always wondered what's going on there. Back in college they said green is treated differently in TV standards due to the way our eyes respond to it, due to prevalence of green in plants. Interesting stuff. :cool:
 

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