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Discussion in 'Photography Forums' started by Renz, Apr 7, 2005.

  1. Renz

    Renz
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    Hi, I'm new to DSLR's having just "upgraded" from an EOS 500 (35mm) to a 20D. It hasn't arrived yet but I know that the camera is bundled with Photoshop Elements 2 and I was wondering whether it would be better to get either the v3 or the Paintshop Pro 9. Any ideas an which is the better software to use as a novice?
    I've also ordered a 1gb Ultra CF card so I was toying with the idea of experimenting with RAW files, I believe that they need a little work, is it easy enough to do or do you think that I'd be better off to start with JPEG?
    Thanks for your help.
     
  2. seany

    seany
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    I have a 20D and i have photo shop elements 2 and photoshop CS. I think that if you've never used such a program before, elements 2 will be enough. I'd say the average person would only ever need elements. I'd leave paint shop pro and stick with photoshop. The camera was bundled with softwear to process raw of course photoshop can to.

    Beauty about Digital is you can just try both it will cost you nothing.
     
  3. Johndm

    Johndm
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    PShop elements 2 will do you proud with those large jpegs, but you will need CS for RAW files.

    Stick with the jpegs to start, you won't get much advantage with RAW until you start to get serious, and/or have a glossy magazine ask you for a high res copy for 'serious' enlargement, in exchange for several hundred of their pounds... :smashin:

    All these shot in 'large jpeg', http://www.airliners.net/search/pho...rnet.com&sort_order=views&distinct_entry=true

    but resized down to 1024x7xx in PS elements, along with a little cropping, levels adjust, and most importantly.....unsharp mask....
    but thats another story/thread.. :thumbsup:
     
  4. tomson

    tomson
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    if you do venture into RAW territory then the software that comes bundled with your 20D will handle the files - you can tweak the exposure, white balance etc etc then save as a tiff/jpeg or whatever you prefer, open it in elements and enhance/degrade to your hearts content.
     
  5. Renz

    Renz
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    Thanks for the replies. Not much difference between the Elements 2 and 3 then?
     
  6. severnsource

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    The main advantage of Elements 3 is that it comes with a decent cataloguing program, which will be useful once you get to a few hundred pictures.

    For an interesting perspective on RAW vs jpeg try http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/raw.htm.
     
  7. HotblackDesiato

    HotblackDesiato
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    Elements3 supports the CameraRAW plugin (albeit with limited options relative to CS), has limited 16bit support, and i think the heal brush was new to E3 too. In everyday operation i'm not sure there's much you can do on 3 that you couldn't do on 2.
     
  8. Renz

    Renz
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    Thanks everyone for your "enlightenment". :)
     
  9. condyk

    condyk
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    Personally, when I decided to go the DSLR route a while back I also decided to go for 100% RAW and a suitable application to easily manage the workflow. Memory is cheap these days and USB2 or firewire is fast enough to support larger files. You can use DP Magic (free) to view the RAW files in the standard Windows viewer, which is half the battle, and just delete the rubbish. Only work spending time on the excellent shots.

    Next, I am currently using Photoshop CS, with I am more familiar with from web development days, but also trying Rawshooter Essentials 2005, which is a free RAW workflow processing application. Both do a good job, but Rawshooter has a non standard interface which I find a bit irritating, simply because i need to learn yet another 'usability metaphor' :-( It's not too bad though and there is a workflow logic there.

    JPEG's I know well from web development and have used Fireworks (my preference), PS CS and PS Essentials, along with others. PS Essentials is fine for JPEG's and non-pro use. As it's free, why not just try it out if it supports RAW? Or, download the free Rawshooter Essentials.
     

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