So how exactly are cinemas going to reopen?

gavinhanly

Distinguished Member
Also how do you get pass anyone on your row, when entering/leaving or going to the loo in the middle of the movie thats usually a close squeeze.
 

Billy Goodgun

Well-known Member
As with everything, it's not going to be simple.

Someone above mentioned temperature checks. They could do that at the door, and that might help matters. It could also be a way of preliminary testing people, and possibly alerting them to the fact they need to have a proper test. That might help make people inside feel easier as well.

I don't feel uneasy about going back myself, but I do like my rare trips to the cinema. If they become a faff and more of a pain than an enjoyment, I'd have to reconsider even going.
It certainly isn't going to be simple - many of the same questions apply for returning our lot to the office (we're all working from home at the moment). It's a nightmare to co-ordinate.

And sorry if it seems that I'm singling you out (I'm not, I promise - I just happen to be in this thread, and I've seen it repeated a lot!) but temperature checks are not a useful method to screen people for having covid-19.

Yes, I know the Chinese authorities and other countries have been using temperature screening.

Yes, I agree it's probably better than nothing.

Yes, it may provide some (false) comfort to those going to the cinema. I get all of that.

But as a reliable indicator? No, for a variety of reasons.

First, people can be carriers and asymptomatic. Second, even if you're symptomatic, the "fever" stage of having a temperature doesn't last as long as the overall disease. But the main reason is that if you're feverish, most people will take some form of pain relief (such as paracetamol), which then suppresses the temperature anyway.

What that means is that even if you have a fever from covid-19 right then, temperature screening won't flag you as a risk.

Happy trails, everyone!
 

rustybin

Distinguished Member
I think it's going to be that if you're vulnerable, you won't be going to the cinema for a while, if you're not, you could choose to. Like lots of things moving forward.
 

Eliminator

Novice Member
I usually go during the day, ie before afternoon, and its always empty, so no fears going back, face masks will be compulsory, santizer in hand
I appreciate facemasks are going to be necessary but I don't think I would want to go to watch a movie if I had to wear one for the duration. I think I would prefer to sit at home negate mask and watch a movie on the home cinema. Especially as some people will probably think the same, still go to the cinema and just remove their mask in the dark.
 

SteveAWOL

Distinguished Member
Interesting. I always assumed asymptomatic people were passing it by touching things. Realistically, how much viral matter are you just generally breathing out? That suggests it is airborne.
FWIW... this coronavirus doesn’t appear to float around in the air quite so much as truly airborne diseases like measles at least.

1590146721853.jpeg


And from what I’ve read, even cotton face masks should provide quite a bit of protection against the infectious particles.


1590148590653.jpeg
 

password1

Well-known Member
It doesn't matter how many seats apart you are from someone infected, its an invisible airborne virus, you wont be guaranteed not to catch it especially in a room for up to 2 hours with no windows and little fresh air circulating. The airborne virus will spread around the room.

You wont be 100% safe.
 

Freestyler8

Active Member
It doesn't matter how many seats apart you are from someone infected, its an invisible airborne virus, you wont be guaranteed not to catch it especially in a room for up to 2 hours with no windows and little fresh air circulating. The airborne virus will spread around the room.

You wont be 100% safe.
Except... Not properl airborne. And a lack of circulating air is actually helpful, meaning particles won't spread so much in the air.
 

barnaby jones

Distinguished Member
It doesn't matter how many seats apart you are from someone infected, its an invisible airborne virus, you wont be guaranteed not to catch it especially in a room for up to 2 hours with no windows and little fresh air circulating. The airborne virus will spread around the room.

You wont be 100% safe.
Nothing is 100% safe. Everything is a calculated risk.
 

password1

Well-known Member
There are lots of things cinemas can do to reduce risk.

Temperature checks
Masks
sanitising
alcohol gel at entrances
disposable seat covering costs pennies
no entry for anyone with symptoms
 

gavinhanly

Distinguished Member
They'll also have to review their ticket cancellation policies (as you can't go if you develop symptoms) - and the advance ticket market is going to fall through the floor for a bit.
 

The_Wierd

Well-known Member
Pretty much stopped going to the cinema a while ago, last movie I saw there was Avengers Endgame, and I went by myself on a quiet afternoon. I started to hate the 40 minutes of ads and trailers, ridiculously priced refreshments, people on their phones, talking through out the movie, someone kicking the back of your seat, and our local Vue is a bit of a dump with uncomfortable seats and crap projection quality. The last time I went with my wife a fight broke out in a group of drunk people, and she won’t go again. Add to that the risk of a potentially fatal respiratory virus, and I don’t care if they ever open again. I think I’ll stick with my home cinema, thanks.
 

Greg Hook

Moderator & Reviewer
Yeah, that's pretty nonsense isn't it.

50% capacity is fine, but what if several want to go to the loo and pass each other in the aisle?

How does 50% capacity help you if someone two rows behind you is coughing COVID all over the place?
 

Greg Hook

Moderator & Reviewer
ill go maybe mask on lol
You know the mask only protects other people from you, it doesn't protect you from other people if they are not wearing masks.
 

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