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Snowboarding/Sports Camera

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Editing Forum' started by AH_Viper, May 30, 2005.

  1. AH_Viper

    AH_Viper
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    Hi guys!

    Was wondering if you guys could help point me in the right direction for a small compact rugged Camcoder for use with snowboarding.

    Im taking a instructors course next year and was looking at getting an improvement on my aging Sony DCR-TRV17E:

    http://www.ciao.co.uk/Sony_Handycam_DCR_TRV17E__5600906

    Im looking for anything around £400 - £500 and because I use it while on the move ,a side screen isn't that important ( given I don't have it open because I don't want to fall a crack the bugger off ;) )

    I was trying to find something with a high frame rate but nothing realy even quotes the frame rate so I dunno where to start searching :(

    Cheers in advance guys
     
  2. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    AFAIK all the modern digital camcorders will have an LCD screen. So just don't use it :D
    Frame rate is going to be the same on all UK PAL camcorders. The standard refresh rate is 25 full frames per second interlaced. Many cams can be set to progressive scan mode, but although this in effect doubles the frame rate to 50 full frames per second, but it then makes fast movement jerkey, so not recommended for video use as it is designed for capture of still images (photo mode).

    IMO you should just find a cam that you find comfortable to use. Make sure you can attach filters to the lens as in snow you will probably need a neutral density filter to cut down the amount of reflected light off the snow.

    Mark.
     
  3. AH_Viper

    AH_Viper
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    Cheers for the info, but I was wondering if you could alabarate more on the progressive scan bit? How can an effective 50FPS give jittery movement :confused: Not a problem if you don't know exactly, it's probably just one of those things you need to see to believe and ill just take your word for it :)

    I never even thought about filters, but at my price I don't think theres many I was looking through that don't have the ability to take them :)

    I was looking at the Panasonic NV-GS150 and others in that range.

    Anyone have experience of using these cameras for sporting purposes?
     
  4. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    :oops: sorry it's been a long day. Not everybody gets bank holidays off work.

    The frame rate on progressive scan mode is halved to 12.5 frames per second, not doubled. My point still stands though that you can't get different frame rates on camcorders other than with the prog scan mode. The only exception to this that I know of is American NTSC camcorders that have a refresh rate of 30 full frames per second, but you don't want to use NTSC in a country that uses PAL.

    Sorry for the confusion. It's way past my bedtime :boring: as 5 o'clock will be here again far too soon.

    Mark.
     
  5. Roy Mallard

    Roy Mallard
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    The frame rate stays the same on all domestic camcorders regardless of shutter speed, progressive or interlace scan.

    The frame rate is always 25 frames per second. The field rate may differ (50 for interlace, 25 for progressive) but the number of complete images you see on the screen in the space of 1 second is always 25 (for slower shutters than 1/25th some frames will be repeated, but you will still see 25 of them a second).

    Interlace lends itself to normal motion as the 50 fields look more natural and fluid in movement than 25 progressive.

    The high end DVCPRO cameras (& the new HD prosumer one) allow the frame rate to be varied (slow for time elapse record, fast for fluid slow-mo sequences)

    Anyway, this is all spliiting hairs. You want a camcorder that allows you to change the shutter speed, if you are in snow doing sports then a) the image will be very bright and b) 1/50th shutter (the default) will just look mushy becuase of the motion blur.

    A camera like the Panasonic GS150 gives you manual control over the shutter, so you can set it at a high speed (maybe up to 1/500th for your given application) killing two bird with one stone: reducing motion artefacts and reducing the amount of light reaching the ccds.
     
  6. AH_Viper

    AH_Viper
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    Cool, so a PANSONIC NV-GS150 ~£500: http://www.google.dealtime.co.uk/xPF-PANSONIC_NVGS150 sounds like a good bet to you guys?

    The 3CDD quailty is appealing as i would kinda want to keep it long term as a sports use peice of kit. Anyone got any opinions on wether the 3CCD is worth the cash?

    As the idea of spending less doesnt't "disgust" me, I looked around for something cheaper and found the Panasonic NV-GS75EG ~£350: http://www.google.dealtime.co.uk/xPF-PANASONIC_NVGS75

    The only listed difference for me, as I ain't interested in still shots, is the CDD resolution of 540K pixels compared to the 800K pixels of the GS150. I know the GS150 surely would be better in a fashion, but is it £200 better :)
     

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