Smoke Alarms

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Greg Hook, Jan 8, 2012.

  1. Greg Hook

    Greg Hook
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    What is it with people and their refusal to fit smoke alarms?

    I know in this day and age everyone is busy and trying to save every penny they can, but you can get a smoke alarm for £5.

    They should make more of an effort of stating there was no working smoke alarm when they report on house fires which cause death or injury.

    This horrifically tragic one just today:
    BBC News - Man and three children die after fire in Lancashire bungalow

    Obviously don't have all the details but the fact that:
    shows that a smoke alarm would have saved 4 lives. After this latest I think an ad campaign to highlight the issue should be done again.
     
  2. jonna

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    I never realised there were different types of alarms -'Choosing a smoke alarm
    There are two types of smoke alarm:
    Ionisation alarms
    Ionisation alarms are the cheapest and most readily available smoke alarms. They are also very sensitive to 'flaming fires' - fires that burn fiercely, like chip-pan fires. Ionisation alarms will detect flaming fires before the smoke gets too thick.
    Optical alarms
    Optical alarms are more expensive. However, they are more effective at detecting slow-burning fires, like smouldering foam-filled furniture or overheated wiring. Optical alarms are less likely to go off accidentally and so are best for ground-floor hallways and for homes on one level.
    For the best protection, you should install one of each. However, if you can’t have both, it’s still safer to have either one, rather than none at all'.
     
  3. Chadford

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  4. HotblackDesiato

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    Add to this heat alarms for high dust areas... we have them in the loft, basement and garage.
     
  5. ODB_69

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    What's best type for kitchens?
     
  6. HotblackDesiato

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    Photoelectric will be less prone to nuisance alarms in a kitchen, ideally you want both types, you can also buy alarms that incorporate both technolgies.
     
  7. noiseboy72

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    The problem with cheap smoke alarms or where they have been fitted in the wrong place is that people disconnect them as they become a nuisance. Ours goes off if we toast with the kitchen door open! The is a particular issue in rented property where the landlord will have fitted them as a matter of course.

    I think all alarms should be fitted by a competent installer in the same way that gas appliances and electrical work needs to be. High risk properties - social housing etc. should have tamper proof mains alarms that cannot be disconnected fitted.

    These news reports seem all too common and are just so sad :( Cut backs in overnight fire cover mean that average responses in many areas have almost doubled as well, as retained firefighters need to travel into the station to pick up the appliance.

    The BBC report said this fire started in the bedrooms. A fire alarm fitted in the hall may have saved other people in the house, but possibly not whoever was in that room.
     
  8. Inferno

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    The fire service will fit them for free if you ring them and ask for a free home fire risk check, so you don't even need to pay.

    Smoke alarms : Directgov - Home and community

    Quote "
    Installing your smoke alarm

    Some fire and rescue services in England offer free home fire risk checks. This involves firefighters visiting your home and offering fire safety advice for you and your household. They may be able to install your smoke alarm for free.
    It usually takes a few minutes to install your smoke alarm yourself - just follow the manufacturer's instructions that come with it. The best place for your smoke alarm is on the ceiling, near or at the middle of the room or hall. The alarm should be at least 30cm (one foot) away from a wall or light.
    If it is difficult for you to fit your smoke alarm yourself, ask a family member or friend to help you, or contact your local fire and rescue service.

     
  9. ODB_69

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    Just ordered a heat alarm for kitchen, smoke alarm in living room next door and door always open (cats) so I figure that will cover us. Ordered another smoke alarm for hall and another Carbon Monoxide detector. Got them all already like but if doubling up on them helps detect anything quicker then £30 is nothing
     
  10. gibbsy

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    Beat me to it. It is a service that all brigades in the UK offer.

    The majority of fatalities in fires will have died long before the actual fire reaches them, many do not even wake up and die in their beds.

    It's so very important to have a smoke alarm. Unlike the fires that are portrayed on television programmes such as the recent 'Eastenders', you simply will not be able to walk through a fire, walk upright in a fire and you will perish.
     
  11. SevloW

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    Agree, no excuse not to have any fitted. Something I did years ago was go through with the family what to do in the event of a fire - and the preferred escape route plus alternative escape routes. Only takes a little time to do and it may save a life or lives.
     
  12. HotblackDesiato

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    The more the better. The house we have here came wired with 9, a mixture of ionising, photoelectric, heat and carbon monoxide.

    The other thing i'd not realised before was the recommendation that the ionising type are swapped out after 10 years. Just replaced a bunch of ours.
     
  13. Ayub

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    If you ask me, the govt should make it law. Anyone with a electrical appliance or gas appliance fitted needs to have a smoke detector and have it tested every week/month or even year.

    I have a full mains kit which i test every month myself and is tested by a approved sparkie every year. My family and I are worth it.
     
  14. baldrick

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    Here in Rhode Island building codes (regs in the UK) require that every new build be fitted with multiple smoke and CO detectors. We have one in each bedroom, 2 in the 1st floor landing, one downstairs, 1 in the garage, 1 in the basement and I think one in the loft. They are hardwired so that when one goes off they all do and they're also linked into the alarm system so that as soon as they go off the monitoring station is alerted and they can call the Fire Brigade. It was primarily for this reason that I had the alarm system fitted...
     
  15. niceguy235uk

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    It isnt "law" at the moment to have them fitted.

    However, most LABC's want them fitted when there are major works being done in the home.

    And you would be surprised at the amount of people that argue AGAINST having them.:suicide:
     
  16. Ayub

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    Three weeks ago family here buried their son. He was only 5, I know the family very well. Fire started ipvc door locked key in dads room due to high number of thefts in area. Dad jumps out of window family lives son dies of inhalation. Far too many regrets but can't turn time back. So many if and buts in tbe end he is destroyed. I think of the family everyday I can't imagine what he thinks of orhow he feels.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2012
  17. kBm

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    They have - any new home must have mains powered smoke detectors fitted, part of the building regs.

    The main problem is getting people to maintain thier smoke detector - the fire service can fit them until they are blue in the face, as soon as that battery is taken out when it beeps....
     
  18. Ayub

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    That should be a clause in your home contents insurance.
     
  19. Ayub

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    Have started my building work and first things i have thought of in this order , Smoke detectors, heat detectors,call points ( break glass boxes), emergency lighting insulation, builders,money :p

    Then let the cat6 and hdmi begin :p
     
  20. IronGiant

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    I'm guilty of getting some mains powered ones and not getting around to fitting them. So I've bought some battery ones to keep my conscience clear in the mean time.
     
  21. p9ul

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    Building regs ask for mains powered alarms (all interlinked so if one goes off, they all go off) and are to have battery backup in case of power failure.
     
  22. baldrick

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    My parents went to the expense of having a full sprinkler system installed in a house they built and it made no difference to the insurance premium! Admittedly they did it to negate the requirement to have closers installed on every door, but you'd have thought a fully redundant fire suppression system would have saved a few sheckles!?!?
     
  23. IronGiant

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    For new development, yes. This wasn't.
     
  24. sparkie1984

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    Well done op, if this saves one life job well done,

    I'm sorry but I despise people who don't have an alarm of some sort, there is NO excuse at all for not having something.

    A small child can't install one and I feel a parent should be held responsible if they don't and something happens
     
  25. kBm

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    They're too early! Common practice in the US/ Canada for residential sprinklers. A new law was passed last year for Wales for new homes to have sprinklers fitted. Give it 10 years, it'll be a part of building regs for England.

    Something need to happen - the gov have tried new laws (smoke detection for new homes, windows to open fully on ground floors) campaign after campaign, ('pull your finger out' etc) yet people are still losing lives in fires in the home. :(
     
  26. sparkie1984

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    In some cases it is specified to have a sprinkler system, something to do with ease of fire engine access.

    Jut worked somewhere they had to have a full system installed, huge mains supply needed too!
     
  27. gibbsy

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    Wales will become the first country in the world where sprinklers will be compulsory in all new homes.

    The law will apply to newly built houses and blocks of flats, as well as care homes and university halls of residence.

    Although this legislation will push up the cost of new housing it will certainly save lives and protect property. Thankfully the sprinkler system is not they portray in films and TV, the only head that will be actuated is the one directly involved in the fire. They only ever go off all over the place on film and TV.

    I should point out that there are two types of sprinklers, dry and charged. Dry systems are old and very few and far between and are actuated by other means, ie, zoned fire detectors. They are not suitable for domestic properties.
     
  28. imightbewrong

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    Sprinklers are a tough one:

    - they do damage in their own right - maybe more for small fires. Do they all go off if ones goes off? Does that mean if one goes off, every piece of electronics in the house is instantly destroyed?

    - what is their reliablity? if one goes off by mistake (equivalent of the toaster) then you house gets flooded for nothing - e.g. if you are carrying your ladder into the house and knock one, or your kids throw a ball or whatever.

    I am NOT saying that I am against sprinklers, but I could see why an insurance company wouldn't necessarily reduce a premium for one. To me they are life-saving sure, but not necessarily stuff-saving
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2012
  29. ODB_69

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    I dont see why anyone would not have at least 1 smoke alarm. I just find that all very odd. I had enough anyway but this thread has made me para so I'm doubling up but its a tiny price to pay if it helps warn us earlier. Surely not to have at least 1 alarm is utter madness?!
     
  30. sparkie1984

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    I'm pretty sure their activated by vials of something heating up and breaking mate, not by smoke or a toast burning etc
     

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