Slick 50

jarraman

Well-known Member
I remember years ago someone telling me that oil companies complained about the efficiency of Slick 50 in your car engine.

As a result a certain chemical was removed and its now not quite as good Dont know if this is true but I still use it.

For those who dont know Slick 50 is probably the slippiest thing in the world (not quite as slippy as Blair though).

When you leave your car parked overnight the oil in your engine sinks into the sump. On starting your car from cold for a brief period their is no oil on the moving parts of your engine.

Slick 50 erradicates the problem and no I do not work for them or sell the stuff. Just interested in other peoples opinions
 

h4rri

Active Member
Just be sure you don't have a 'wet clutch' before you add it ;)

Used it for years in bikes etc, remember the old sales pitch with oil, ball bearings, drill and a hand torque meter :)
 

bishbashboshdj

Well-known Member
never used it but my car mechanics tutor used to rave on about it.....

It makes the oil stick to the parts hence making them more lubed during the early phases of engine usage. (normally the oil just runs off straight away).

He once showed us the difference it made by pouring the bottle into the oil tank whilst the engine was running, audibly you could hear a change after about 30 seconds.

there's also a petrol additive he use to go on about but cant remember what its called
 

steptoe

Active Member
For those who dont know Slick 50 is probably the slippiest thing in the world (not quite as slippy as Blair though).
:rotfl::rotfl::rotfl:
but back to the thread
i was always told it causes o ring and seal deteriation .if this is wrong i might give it go
anybody know
 

RMCF

Distinguished Member
I have used Greased Lightning on several occasions.

Definitely makes the engine run more smoothly and more quiet. If its really doing any real good I couldn't tell you.

But they do say that friction is evil in engines, and anything that can reduce it surely can't be bad.
 

Garrett

Moderator
Used it for years in bikes etc, remember the old sales pitch with oil, ball bearings, drill and a hand torque meter :)

Was that not the demo for Greased Lightning that one of the shopping channels use to do?

Wasent there one oil adative that put a very film of teflon on cylinder walls of the engine
 

shortone

Standard Member
there's also a petrol additive he use to go on about but cant remember what its called

Most likely REDEX, added to petrol to prevent carbon build up. Been around for years and years but now available in many different types.

Andy
 

electrolyte

Well-known Member
My opinion is don't put this stuff in your car.

I worked for 10 years for in the R&D section of an engine oil company developing and testing engine oils. The engine oils that you put in your car are a complex mixture of oil and additives. Each formulation will have been extensively tested in engine tests accredited by the major car manufacturers eg VW, BMW, Mercedes, Ford, GM, Toyota, Nissan etc.

For each oil formulation developed by an oil company £millions are spent on tests to prove that the formulation works in all engines, protects, reduces engine wear, deposits, sludge, soot etc. Only after spending a few million pounds testing the oil will the car manufacturers allow oil companies to add the oil to their cars.

Slick 50 on the other hand have not spent these £millions testing their product. The reason for this is they know that they can't substantiate their claims. If they did try to test the effectiveness of their product in these industry standard engine tests I would bet my mortgage that they would fail the tests badly.

These two websites sum up how effective Slick 50 and other additives are:

Slick 50 taken to court and lose over unsubstantiated claims in the US

Skeptics Dictionary - Slick 50

If you follow the instructions in your owners manual about oil types and oil change frequency you don't need to add slick 50 to your engine. Your engine oil will be perfectly good at protecting your engine.
 

paul1967

Active Member
Car companies now recommend oil changes every 3000 miles,that a lot of money earned through servicing, now if someone came along and said,with this you only need to change every 9000miles ,who do you think would try to poo poo it. I've used it for 15yrs in every car and thats alot i've bought and had no problems. And there yanks.
 

paulyoung666

Distinguished Member
Car companies now recommend oil changes every 3000 miles,that a lot of money earned through servicing, now if someone came along and said,with this you only need to change every 9000miles ,who do you think would try to poo poo it. I've used it for 15yrs in every car and thats alot i've bought and had no problems. And there yanks.


since when :rolleyes:
 

electrolyte

Well-known Member
Car companies now recommend oil changes every 3000 miles,that a lot of money earned through servicing, now if someone came along and said,with this you only need to change every 9000miles ,who do you think would try to poo poo it. I've used it for 15yrs in every car and thats alot i've bought and had no problems. And there yanks.

Which car companies recommend 3000 mile oil changes exactly? In the states maybe some still do but in Europe many are 20,000 or 30,000 now. That's for a number of reasons one of which is that the additives and the base oils used in the engine oils have been designed to last that long.

My Golf GTI when filled with the right oil can last 20K between services.
 

hufartd

Active Member
Teflon will not stick to anything unless it's baked at above 600 degrees.
There are many docs on this on the car polishing forums as manufacturers claim to put teflon in protective car care products.
 

paulyoung666

Distinguished Member
Which car companies recommend 3000 mile oil changes exactly? In the states maybe some still do but in Europe many are 20,000 or 30,000 now. That's for a number of reasons one of which is that the additives and the base oils used in the engine oils have been designed to last that long.

My Golf GTI when filled with the right oil can last 20K between services.


the only one i can think of is the mad powerful fq mitsubishis , i would like to bet even porsches etc will be 10,000 miles minimum :)
 

electrolyte

Well-known Member
the only one i can think of is the mad powerful fq mitsubishis , i would like to bet even porsches etc will be 10,000 miles minimum :)

I can well believe this. Before I left the oil company in 2004 Porsche had developed a series of tests to prove that an oil lasted for at least 20K km between services. So I am sure almost 4 years later they will have longer service intervals.

All of the European car makers were embracing long-life oil technology so that consumers didn't have to visit the dealership so often. They use it as a selling point for new cars. Even in the US this was starting to happen (although 3000 mile servicing was still common when I left over the pond)
 

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