1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

SKY>>VIDEO SENDER>>PC TFT ---WHAT DO I NEED??

Discussion in 'Desktop & Laptop Computers Forum' started by Pebble, Dec 1, 2004.

  1. Pebble

    Pebble
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2003
    Messages:
    311
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Grangemouth
    Ratings:
    +4
    Hi all,

    Please help a very confused man--

    I am looking for the best way of sending Sky in my living room to a PC TFT in my bedroom using a video sender.

    I am after a new computer + 17 inch TFT so anything goes regarding connections fron the video sender to the PC/TFT.(I've not even got the video sender yet)

    What would be the most viable and cost friendly option to do this?? and what type of kit would I need??-

    Motherboard /Graphics card with the suitable inputs+ TFT PC monitor http://www.microdirect.co.uk/ProductInfo.aspx?ProductID=7908&source=Dealtime
    or a LCD TV with scart like this http://www.microdirect.co.uk/ProductInfo.aspx?ProductID=7196&source=Dealtime at approx £100 dearer.

    I wouldn't be using the PC for game playing - Only surfing/DVD burnin/editing + watching Sky TV (Hopefully)

    Would there be much difference in picture quality in the two methods??

    Thanks

    Pebble
     
  2. joffonon

    joffonon
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2002
    Messages:
    105
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Location:
    Westcliff-on-Sea, Great Britain
    Ratings:
    +2
    Videosenders can only send a composite picture, via either SCART, phono socket or UHF aerial socket. Looks like the second option is the one you want, as it has the necessary sockets for both TV & PC use, whereas the former only has PC inputs.
     
  3. Pebble

    Pebble
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2003
    Messages:
    311
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Grangemouth
    Ratings:
    +4
    Thanks Joffonon,

    I was leaning towards the 2nd option.

    Has anyone tried using a LCD TV with a composite picture from Sky/Freeview or cable - Is it any good?

    Thanks

    Pebble
     
  4. Nick Cartwright

    Nick Cartwright
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    If you have a PC in your bedroom then you can get a cheap TV card (PAckard Bell PBTV 1000(i think) from PC WORLD £40) and download a program called Dscaler which will do a great job of de-interlacing the signal.

    Basically just plug the Composite output from the Sender into the TV card, start up Dscaler and you will get pretty stunning results for a composite input.

    Dscaler also allows you to add filters to impove the picture further.

    I use a video sender with my PC (Packard Bell card again which has a lot less video noise than other cards) into a Barco 808 CRT projector on a 7.5 foot screen and the picture is very acceptable, so should be more than up for the job on a 17 inch screen.

    The Packard bell card is the key, I had tried other cards but all showed up masses of video noice. for some reason PB have come up with a real bargain that outperform a lot of the more expensive cards.

    Thanks

    Nick
     
  5. Pebble

    Pebble
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2003
    Messages:
    311
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Grangemouth
    Ratings:
    +4
    Thanks for that Nick,


    My head's thumping now,

    I'll look into the PB card and maybe try it on my old computer b4 purchasing a new monitor

    Thanks

    Pebble
     
  6. Pebble

    Pebble
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2003
    Messages:
    311
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Grangemouth
    Ratings:
    +4
  7. Nick Cartwright

    Nick Cartwright
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Can't go wrong for £20.

    All you do is install Dscaler first and the the card and drivers. Dscaler shoudl detect the card and take you through the tuning/setup (you don't need to bother with tuning the channels if using for SKY). Once Dscaler is installed then you can select the input (composite/Svideo etc) and then just play about with the colours, contrast and Brightness until you are happy.

    Should be plenty of info on setting the card up on this forum.
     
  8. mpats1

    mpats1
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2002
    Messages:
    15
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    london
    Ratings:
    +0
    Hi guys , im interested in this also... what vidio senders do u reccomend?

    I noticed the digisender does a scart to scart connection wirlessly.. but they also have the UHF aerial convertor:

    http://www.digisender.net/_Europes_No1_Video_Sender_Company.html

    would this be abe to carry the signal into a TV card to view on a monitor?

    Thanks
    Mak.
     
  9. Nick Cartwright

    Nick Cartwright
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    I think all senders, even with SCART, only send a composite signal plus stereo. mine has the usual red, white and yellow wires which plug into a scart adaptor. Basically I use the yellow video through the composite of my Video card and use Dscaler to de-interlace the pictue (Dscaler is far superior to the software that comes with the cards.

    It's pretty straight forward. If the scart is hard wired, then a scard femal to 3 RCA lead or adaptor will split the yellow composite chanel which can plug straight in.

    Can't remember my senders make, but it is ok. I mainly use it to feed HTPC and projetor with Sport when I have people round to watch the rugby League.

    Dscaler does a good job of gettign rid of jaggie edges etc normally associated with composite conections.
     

Share This Page

Loading...