• New Patreon Tier and Early Access Content available. If you would like to support AVForums, we now have a new Patreon Tier which gives you access to selected news, reviews and articles before they are available to the public. Read more.

Sky Remote Channel Switching

beejco

Standard Member
It's been a long time guys, but I'm back with a question.

I have recently been experimenting with the possibility of using a Magic Eye (in the bedroom) to switch the channels on the Sky+ (which is downstairs in the living room). The setup I currently have is the terrestrial enters the loft space, and into an Antiference A240D Booster. Only 3 of the 4 booster outputs are used, ie: feeding two bedrooms and the living room. Now, I have Sky in the living room, which is not through any amplifier/booster, and as mentioned earlier, I also have terrestrial (hence freeview) via output 1 of the A240D. As I always use the sky only in the living room, there is no need for the terrestrial, so, my plan was to move the terrestrial cable from the Sky RF IN to the SKY RF2 OUT, thus, throwing the Sky back up the coax into the loft. Up the loft, I then unplugged the other end of said cable from the Booster, and plugged into an RF Combiner/Splitter. The other input of the combiner was connected to one of Booster outputs. The splitter output was then routed via coax down into the bedroom and into the LCD RF IN. Once I had changed the Sky RF OUT Channel to 25 using Services 401, and retuned the bedroom TV, I got very clear freeview and very clear Sky.

While this all works well, with no problems, I now need to make sure I can switch the Sky Box channels using a magic eye (which I have already ordered, but not yet received). So, with the RF Power Supply output switched to ON (again via Services 401), and using a DMM, I managed to get 9V at the Sky Box RF2, although as the wall mount panel in the living room seems to be of the isolated type, the 9V will not get back up the loft. This can be easily remedied by fitting a Non-Isolated type, although the Antiference A240D Booster (mentioned earlier) provides a 9V for the purposes of using a magic eye. As I am using a combiner/splitter up the loft, the 9V manages to get itself onto the output of the combiner and down to the bedroom TV. I'm now getting to the question (sorry)!

So, I now have 9V DC at the bedroom TV input, so this will power the magic eye (when I receive it), although:

Q - How does the signal from the bedroom remote actually travel back down the coax back to the Sky Box. Does it modulate the 9V DC with the remote signal picked up by the magic eye IR, or does it send pure RF back down the coax to the box without using the 9V. In other words, is the 9V purely to supply power to the eye, and not used to actually get the signal back to the Sky Box. As I said before, the panel in the living room is isolated, so if the 9V is actually used to get the control signal back down, I will have to change to a non-isolated.

Q - And if the 9V is physically used for routing purposes, why does the Antiference box source another 9V. Is it simply to provide a 9V closer to the location of the eye.

As I don't yet have the eye, I'm trying to work out if I will be able to switch channels by using the Booster 9V to power the magic eye, and have the Sky Box RF Power Supply switched off.

Once again, sorry, it's a bit of a novel, but I'm sure someone can help here.
:):):):)
 

MartinPickering

Well-known Member
Q - How does the signal from the bedroom remote actually travel back down the coax back to the Sky Box. Does it modulate the 9V DC with the remote signal picked up by the magic eye IR, or does it send pure RF back down the coax to the box without using the 9V. In other words, is the 9V purely to supply power to the eye, and not used to actually get the signal back to the Sky Box. As I said before, the panel in the living room is isolated, so if the 9V is actually used to get the control signal back down, I will have to change to a non-isolated.

The return signal is a modulated carrier at about 47MHz (AFAIK). The 9 - 12V DC is merely required to power the "eye" (and the SkyLink compatible amplifier, if it doesn't have its own supply). So you should be fine, provided that your connections will pass the (relatively low frequency) 47MHz, bearing in mind that the isolating capacitor in the wall plate will have been chosen to pass UHF TV frequencies (470MHz to 950MHz).
 
Last edited:

The latest video from AVForums

Hisense U7H TV and T+A Solitaire T headphone reviews, AV/HiFi news plus, what is screen uniformity?
Subscribe to our YouTube channel
Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom