Sky HD questions...

Discussion in 'Sky Digital TV Forum' started by botty1963, Feb 8, 2009.

  1. botty1963

    botty1963
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    Hi all, now I've at last purchased a 1080p TV, I'm thinking about upgrading to Sky HD but have a couple of questions before I do.

    1. Do you have to have the box connected to your phone line? I'm an existing customer (have been since the day Sky started) - my only phone socket is in the opposite corner of the house and I don't want cables running through the house. I know that you do with multi-room, but there is a tangible reason why for that.

    2. I've been told that the HD channels on Sky are not full HD, is that correct? And if so, is the current box capable of full HD or would it mean another box is required when it's available.

    Any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. Miss Chief

    Miss Chief
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    'Full' HD is normally taken to mean 1080p and you're correct that Sky is 'only' 1080i but it still looks good, even on my 1080p TV.

    if it's just the single box you could just run some phone cable from the socket to the box for the callback and tell the engineer you'll run a cable yourself as you'd like ti through the wall or under the skirting board or something and I'm sure he'll be quite happy with that.
     
  3. Trollslayer

    Trollslayer
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    The phone connection is required for setup and pay per view, there is an optional statistics callback which you can ignore.
     
  4. botty1963

    botty1963
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    Cheers - I'll run a temporary cable for the set-up and then whip it out when the guy/lady has gone. I've never bothered with any pay per view so don't need it for that.
     
  5. Jaycee Dove

    Jaycee Dove
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    Nobody in the world transmits TV in 1080 p and the improvement over 1080 i would be far less for most TV sizes and viewing distances than between SD and HD.

    Even on a good 720 p TV Sky HD looks great and whilst 1080p sets offer some improvement you should not wait to get 1080p before going HD as you are missing out needlessly.

    We have two HD boxes (one via a 720 p Panasonic PX, the other a 1080 p Panasonic PZ).

    We have also seen HD from elsewhere in Europe and Sky's standards and range of offering is pretty well unbeatable given how this is still relatively new technology.

    Sky might in future show the odd movie at 1080 p, I suspect, but it will be costly on bandwidth and might only happen if Blu Ray threatens Sky movies subs. :)
     
  6. Dan 800

    Dan 800
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    I have just ordered Sky HD today could you tell me how long it takes until sky deliver and set up the box ?
     
  7. GasDad

    GasDad
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    People keep posting questions about this and for most recent (or older good) displays, sky are for Movies and some other shows effectively broadcasting in 1080p / 25, as long as the display can handle the 2:2 pulldown.

    Think of it like this.

    To make a blue ray, you store a series of images each 1980x1080 at the rate of 24 a second. When you play them back you put them on the screen one after another at 24 a second.

    For a movie transmitted by Sky HD, they take that same stored series of images (1980x1080 at 24 a second), and transmit them as follows

    Frame 1 They Transmit all the odd lines of Image 1
    Frame 2 They Transmit all the even lines of Image 1
    Frame 3 They Transmit all the odd lines of Image 2
    Frame 4 They Transmit all the even lines of Image 2
    and so on.
    But they transmit at 50 frames a second.

    In the TV at the receiving end with proper pulldown, :
    It receives frame 1 - and sticks all the odd lines of image 1 in a buffer
    It recieves frame 2 - and sticks al the even lines of image 1 in a buffer
    it then displays the buffer for a 25th of a second
    It receives frame 3 - and sticks all the odd lines of image 2 in a buffer
    It recieves frame 4 - and sticks al the even lines of image 2 in a buffer
    it then displays the buffer for a 25th of a second
    and so on

    The end result is the same images displayed, but at a slighlty higher speed (25/24ths')

    Now because the encoding isn't really a series of pictures, but the differences between them (though the end result is the same), Blu Ray has the advantage in that it can encode more information about the changes as it has more data space (or bandwidth) to do so. But for scenes with little or no motion there is no difference.


    James
     

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