sky HD not 1080p ?

Shady

Novice Member
Hi all

Does Sky HD only output a maximum of 1080i ?

I have a shiny new Panny 42GT20 - and for the first time can experience full 1080p luvlieness, however I have only seen the screen flash up 1080i as the maximum.

Going through the Sky box settings, the maximum is 1080i or Automatic, whcih I guess is the same maximum value.

Have I been gipped ?


Cheers
 

mjcairney

Well-known Member
.... So, who has gipped you (if such a word even exists)?
Sorry to digress from the reason for the thread, but must say I thought the same as you Broadz, so I looked it up. Can be spelled either gipped or gypped, and means cheated.

We live and learn. :)

Cheers,

Martin.
 

Starburst

Novice Member
Hi all

Does Sky HD only output a maximum of 1080i ?



In terms of the chipset in SKY+HD boxes then yes you would imagine in this day and age 1080p output would be standard but your TV is doing it's own processing anyway which can be better than what SKY and other receivers can do. If you mean SKY (and pretty everyone else in the world) only broadcasting linear (as opposed to VOD) 1080i then it's a simple case of bandwidth cost versus the benefit to the viewer and there is no great benefit between 1080i and 1080p for broadcast quality HD.

More of a factor for Picture Quality is the broadcast bitrate which is significantly lower than Blu-ray but for the most part it's still very viable but that does have far more influence of PQ then an Interlaced versus Progressive broadcast.

Also do some research on optimal setup for the various inputs and sources for the TV to handle be they SD or HD from DVD/Blu-ray or the variety of broadcast sources. Again a poorly setup up display will offer a far inferior picture than any impact on bitrates and resolution well before we get to the interlaced/progressive debate:)
 

HDCriticalFan

Novice Member
Going through the Sky box settings, the maximum is 1080i or Automatic, whcih I guess is the same maximum value.
Bear in mind that the resolution of both 1080i and 1080p is 1920x1080 ... the only difference is how often the entire screen is refreshed (25 full passes or 50 half-passes). The difference is really rather subtle - I wouldn't worry about it.

And for movies (which only have 24 frames in each second) there is no difference at all.





Regards
 

Shady

Novice Member
Thanks to everyone for their 'constructive' comments so far.

For those others, it was a fair question which just surpised me that's all. Having purchased a new 1080p TV I natuarally assumed that I would 'see' the benefit. If the broadcast is only in 1080i, then so be it - just asked the question.

Calm down...
 

HDCriticalFan

Novice Member
Having purchased a new 1080p TV I natuarally assumed that I would 'see' the benefit. If the broadcast is only in 1080i, then so be it - just asked the question.

Calm down...
Still calm here ;)

What you have to bear in mind is that all modern flat screens (LCD and plasma) are by their very nature "progressive". So there is no such thing as a "1080i" TV.

Older CRT screens worked by scanning the lines one at a time. They did this by scanning the odd lines, then the even ones, weaving a complete picture over time. These "half" pictures were redrawn at 50Hz and thus virtually undetectable to the human eye. This was called "interlacing".

Modern fixed pixel screens don't work by scanning. So odd and even lines aren't illuminated alternately, the screen just lights all the pixels up at once. For reasons that aren't to obvious to me as I sit here, that is referred to as "progressive".

You haven't been sold a pup, or cheated in any way. Perhaps these TVs should be sold as 1080 line screens - then we can all be happy that they get the best from SkyHD, which broadcasts 1080 lines in its picture ;)





Regards
 

Broadz

Well-known Member
Having purchased a new 1080p TV I natuarally assumed that I would 'see' the benefit.
Treat yourself to a Blu Ray player or a PS3 if you want to watch 1080p. The manufacturers of Full HD TV sets weren't driven by what is currently being broadcast via aerial, satellite dish and cable. They were driven by what is the highest definition currently available to be viewed from any source. And Blu Ray discs (and HD discs before them) are/were available in 1080p.

When colour TV sets appeared in the late sixties/early seventies, they still successfully showed black and white programmes that were being broadcast. BBC and ITV didn't immediately scrap all black and white TV programmes, just because some people now had tellies which could show colour.

And 1080p TV sets today will still successfully show 1080i programmes (and even standard definition programmes) that are being broadcast today and in the future. So Sky, Virgin, Freesat and Freeview won't stop broadcasting in 1080i for TVs that can handle that screen resolution.
 

logiciel

Moderator
For those others, it was a fair question which just surpised me that's all. Having purchased a new 1080p TV I natuarally assumed that I would 'see' the benefit.
I didn't see any "others" that weren't constructive.
The TV doesn't know what other devices you're going to connect to it - anything from an old video recorder, through a Sky HD receiver, to a BluRay player - but it will do its best to give you the best picture it can from whatever quality you feed in to it.
 

simon194

Well-known Member
Still calm here ;)

Modern fixed pixel screens don't work by scanning. So odd and even lines aren't illuminated alternately, the screen just lights all the pixels up at once. For reasons that aren't to obvious to me as I sit here, that is referred to as "progressive".
It's just another hang over from CRT's because no one could be bothered to think up another name for it when applied to LCD panels, I guess.

When you think about it a CRT displaying a progressive source is essentially doing the same as an LCD panel, displaying the picture a frame at a time if you ignore the fact it takes 1/50th or 1/60th of a second to build the frame on a CRT.
 

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