Size, Levels, & Crossover Frequency. What are things I know nothing about?

DillyDecibels

Novice Member
Help me I am a Stooge

My name is Dillon and I am completely new to the A/V world. I love movies and when the theaters shutdown I had to act immediately. My setup as of now consist of the following:
• Klipsch 8000F(x2)
• Klipsch 504C
• Klipsch 500SA(X2)
• Klipsch SPL-120

These speakers are ran through a Sony STR-DN1080 (from what I have read recently not my best decision) and as of next week, will broadcast onto a Sony A8H 4K OLED TV. Now while I have done an abundance of research, I still find myself wondering do my speakers simply sound good? When they could be sounding great.

I used the mic that came with the Sony receiver to let it auto calibrate. Then using an app on my phone I ran a manual Test Tone for some fine tuning. I can’t figure out how to change the master volume into db’s, so I simply set it to the volume that I watch movies at for the calibration.

Next I read that adjusting the size of the speakers in the receiver was a good idea, and although the auto calibration set them all to large I decided to completely ignore Sony’s suggestion, changing them all to small. This unlocked the ability to use Crossover Frequency.

I set the CF as follows; Fronts: 70hz Center: 90hz Height: 150hz
These settings were all basic suggestions I found on YouTube… so judge away.

On the back of my SPL-120 Sub I originally had it set to LFE, but I recently switched it to 80hz and have no idea if it was the right decision (as I’ve stated I’m learning this from zero prior knowledge, I am now 4 months and thousands of dollars in). If anyone would like to help me out please feel free, you can even take a few jabs at me and I most likely won’t even notice. Thanks
 

Roohster

Distinguished Member
Welcome to the forums :)

This thread is a great place to start:
 

Gasp3621

Distinguished Member
Help me I am a Stooge

My name is Dillon and I am completely new to the A/V world. I love movies and when the theaters shutdown I had to act immediately. My setup as of now consist of the following:
• Klipsch 8000F(x2)
• Klipsch 504C
• Klipsch 500SA(X2)
• Klipsch SPL-120

These speakers are ran through a Sony STR-DN1080 (from what I have read recently not my best decision) and as of next week, will broadcast onto a Sony A8H 4K OLED TV. Now while I have done an abundance of research, I still find myself wondering do my speakers simply sound good? When they could be sounding great.

I used the mic that came with the Sony receiver to let it auto calibrate. Then using an app on my phone I ran a manual Test Tone for some fine tuning. I can’t figure out how to change the master volume into db’s, so I simply set it to the volume that I watch movies at for the calibration.

Next I read that adjusting the size of the speakers in the receiver was a good idea, and although the auto calibration set them all to large I decided to completely ignore Sony’s suggestion, changing them all to small. This unlocked the ability to use Crossover Frequency.

I set the CF as follows; Fronts: 70hz Center: 90hz Height: 150hz
These settings were all basic suggestions I found on YouTube… so judge away.

On the back of my SPL-120 Sub I originally had it set to LFE, but I recently switched it to 80hz and have no idea if it was the right decision (as I’ve stated I’m learning this from zero prior knowledge, I am now 4 months and thousands of dollars in). If anyone would like to help me out please feel free, you can even take a few jabs at me and I most likely won’t even notice. Thanks

I would stick with the Sony calibration system which has been quite effective settings levels and distances (don´t touch on the subwoofer distance!) etc. Just use some tripod or camera stand so you get the mic on seated ear height on the "middle money seat" and make room silent when you run it. Another option is to buy SPL meter (c-weighted, slow), i wouldn´t use phone app.

You have quite capable speakers there. I would start with 80hz for all of those apart from the height channels if upfiring then 150hz and speaker size small. Set the subwoofer crossover knob to LFE and phase to 0. Gain about 10-12.00 clock, you can always fine tune this later from Sony menu "Subwoofer level". You can get bit more grunt for the subwoofer placing it in front corner, if it sounds boomy then move it slightly toward speakers. Not sure what type of room you have. Shame you didn´t come here ask before buying the system, you could have gotten better woofer and receiver, but if this is your first real system i`m sure it sounds superb!

You can also play with few other settings in the Sony, taken from review:

D.C.A.C. EX provides three different curves derived from the EQ/cal results: Engineer, Full Flat, and Front-Reference. The first is designed to cleave to Sony’s listening room standard; the others are selfexplanatory. In this particular instance, I found I preferred the last, as it provided a very subtle brightening/clarifying effect, and not much else. Full Flat seemed a bit too bright, while Engineer was very similar to FrontReference in my setup.

@Sloppy Bob has the Sony 1080 so can help further.
 

Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
The best kit n the world can still sound 'pants' if poorly installed or unsuitable for your room - some pics or plans of your layout is a good start to allow folk to give you a steer on AVR room correction settings and when to use 'auto' or go manual.

Joe

PS If you are currently enjoying the system that is a great start!
 

DillyDecibels

Novice Member
I would stick with the Sony calibration system which has been quite effective settings levels and distances (don´t touch on the subwoofer distance!) etc. Just use some tripod or camera stand so you get the mic on seated ear height on the "middle money seat" and make room silent when you run it. Another option is to buy SPL meter (c-weighted, slow), i wouldn´t use phone app.

You have quite capable speakers there. I would start with 80hz for all of those apart from the height channels if upfiring then 150hz and speaker size small. Set the subwoofer crossover knob to LFE and phase to 0. Gain about 10-12.00 clock, you can always fine tune this later from Sony menu "Subwoofer level". You can get bit more grunt for the subwoofer placing it in front corner, if it sounds boomy then move it slightly toward speakers. Not sure what type of room you have. Shame you didn´t come here ask before buying the system, you could have gotten better woofer and receiver, but if this is your first real system i`m sure it sounds superb!

You can also play with few other settings in the Sony, taken from review:

D.C.A.C. EX provides three different curves derived from the EQ/cal results: Engineer, Full Flat, and Front-Reference. The first is designed to cleave to Sony’s listening room standard; the others are selfexplanatory. In this particular instance, I found I preferred the last, as it provided a very subtle brightening/clarifying effect, and not much else. Full Flat seemed a bit too bright, while Engineer was very similar to FrontReference in my setup.

@Sloppy Bob has the Sony 1080 so can help further.
I would stick with the Sony calibration system which has been quite effective settings levels and distances (don´t touch on the subwoofer distance!) etc. Just use some tripod or camera stand so you get the mic on seated ear height on the "middle money seat" and make room silent when you run it. Another option is to buy SPL meter (c-weighted, slow), i wouldn´t use phone app.

You have quite capable speakers there. I would start with 80hz for all of those apart from the height channels if upfiring then 150hz and speaker size small. Set the subwoofer crossover knob to LFE and phase to 0. Gain about 10-12.00 clock, you can always fine tune this later from Sony menu "Subwoofer level". You can get bit more grunt for the subwoofer placing it in front corner, if it sounds boomy then move it slightly toward speakers. Not sure what type of room you have. Shame you didn´t come here ask before buying the system, you could have gotten better woofer and receiver, but if this is your first real system i`m sure it sounds superb!

You can also play with few other settings in the Sony, taken from review:

D.C.A.C. EX provides three different curves derived from the EQ/cal results: Engineer, Full Flat, and Front-Reference. The first is designed to cleave to Sony’s listening room standard; the others are selfexplanatory. In this particular instance, I found I preferred the last, as it provided a very subtle brightening/clarifying effect, and not much else. Full Flat seemed a bit too bright, while Engineer was very similar to FrontReference in my setup.

@Sloppy Bob has the Sony 1080 so can help further.
Thanks for the info! I will rerun the auto calibration (I definitely messed with the subwoofer distance, so good call lol). The only thing I found to be an issue from the original calibration was with the center channel, the dialog seemed really flat and plain if that makes sense. I was looking for more depth, so I adjusted the centers level -3.5db. I’m not sure if this was the correct way to go about it, but to an untrained ear it seemed to help a bit. Any advice on that?

Also the auto calibration set my height speakers to +6db and people online made it seem like you never want to adjust into the positive. Is there any truth to that?
 

DillyDecibels

Novice Member
The best kit n the world can still sound 'pants' if poorly installed or unsuitable for your room - some pics or plans of your layout is a good start to allow folk to give you a steer on AVR room correction settings and when to use 'auto' or go manual.

Joe

PS If you are currently enjoying the system that is a great start!
The best kit n the world can still sound 'pants' if poorly installed or unsuitable for your room - some pics or plans of your layout is a good start to allow folk to give you a steer on AVR room correction settings and when to use 'auto' or go manual.

Joe

PS If you are currently enjoying the system that is a great start!
Thanks, I’ll try to post some pics along with room dimensions today! And I love the system already! Just want to get everything I can put of it along the way, and always happy to learn something new.
 

The latest video from AVForums

Podcast: Best Home Cinema Sources and B&W 805 D4 Speaker Review and more...
Subscribe to our YouTube channel
Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom