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Silly question

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by lovemovies, Dec 31, 2004.

  1. lovemovies

    lovemovies
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    Within the next six months I hope to get a high definition screen. Also I was looking at going the pc route as the source of material.

    My question is If I use a program like Powerstrip to create a custom resolution to match the screen. Will it be doing the same job as a dedicated seperate scaler does for SD material?

    I have quiet a few WMHD DVD's so I know they will be a true HD picture.

    I just thought that if a free program like Powerstrip can do a good scale job for free, Why spend possibly a grand or two on a seperate unit? :confused:

    I ready to be told how stupid I am now.
     
  2. Stephen Neal

    Stephen Neal
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    Powerstrip itself only allows you to create custom Windows resolutions and video modes with HD (and SD for that matter) timings - so that Windows can correctly fill a 16:9 HDTV monitor.

    What Windows fills the screen with is nothing to do with Powerstrip - all it does is make the video output of the PC HD compatible. You then use other software to generate the video you feed to the TV!

    DScaler is a very popular bit of scaling software that will allow a number of different algorithms to scale SD DVDs and Live SD TV to HD resolutions for PC display. The more sophisticated algorithms require more processing power, but offer better quality results.

    If you are replaying HD 1080line or 720line MPEG2 and running your PC in a 1920x1080 or 1280x720 line display mode then your PC won't be scaling at all as it will be displaying in native. If the 1080 line source is interlaced then de-interlacing will be needed though!

    Bottom line is that hardware scalers are easier to use, install and are more close to a "plug and play" solution. Using a PC requires quite a lot more work, but offers more "fun" if you like fiddling with things!

    (I'm running my PC at 1024x576 50Hz interlaced into my regular 16:9 Sony 50Hz TV using an RGB VGA to RGB SCART + ATI video card + Powerstrip solution. The results are fab - 1920x1080/50i HD sample material looks cracking scaled down to 1024x576! Can't wait until an HD display I can afford and watch becomes feasible!)
     
  3. hornydragon

    hornydragon
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    cause you need £1000+ of PC to do a similar job!!!!!!!!
    I think scalers are a much more convient way to do this in your living room.... and get a projector much much better for films than a plasma or LCD and better VFM but you do need a dark room
     
  4. lovemovies

    lovemovies
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    Cheers. Well I going to spend the next few months reading up so I hopefully make the correct decisions as to which route to go, and if its the PC route, get the right software etc.
     

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