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Shutter Delay Problem

Discussion in 'Photography Forums' started by Johndm, Sep 23, 2003.

  1. Johndm

    Johndm
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    Been taking pictures for many years with Canon SLR kit, and with the introduction of the 300D, have decided its time to go digital.
    Well, nearly anyway!

    Not had much to do with digi cameras of any type until very recently, but the two compacts I've played with seem to be rather differant to film SLR cameras!

    Can't recall the first model, but today it was an Olympus jobbie.
    On depressing the shutter release, ther is a huge delay before the picture is taken........ 2 to 3 seconds?

    Are all digi cameras like this, or is it just the compacts?
    My main subjects are aircraft and motor sport (esp dragsters)
    At present, when a dragster leaves the line, I can catch it off the line as the throttle is floored, but with these digital jobs, if I press the shutter release as the vehicle leaves the line, it will be 250 to 300 yards away before the camera captures it.
     
  2. dejongj

    dejongj
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    Generally yes.....

    Some higher end (read expensive) models are better...but they use a 'trick' in offering less resolution, thus less data to be written to the flash memory....
     
  3. m@rk

    m@rk
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    The high end digital SLRs are a lot better than the low end compact point and shoots.
     
  4. scott69

    scott69
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    I saw the new ricoh G3 compact boasts a 0.14 sec delay.
    It looks like newer models are getting faster.
     
  5. woody67

    woody67
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    What you need to do, and I think this applies to most models, is half press the shutter release - this sets the focus and exposure settings etc.

    Then, when you press it the rest of the way, exposure is more or less instant.

    The digicams perform a lot of electronic stuff before the picture is taken, and although it is done quickly, it still takes seconds or fractions of seconds. If possible, taking some of these settings off automatic, may lessen the time the camera has to prepare for the picture, and so it is taken sooner after pressing the shutter release.

    If sport or other fast action is your thing, then the shutter release time is something to check prior to purchase. Otherwise, for the majority of pictures, the half press of the shutter release button will do.

    However, this delay time is improving with newer models.

    woody
     
  6. Lakeuk

    Lakeuk
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    As above, if you have the camera on auto settings it will take longer as it needs to focus. Put the settings to manual and set them up.

    On the subject of manual setting can anyone give me some advise:-

    I bought a Sony P92 a few weeks back from Amazon (although it's abit cheap now £269 inc free case, than the £300 I paid but thats another story)

    In November I'll be going to watch a Rally in the Lake District and want to take pictures of the rally cars, can anyone advise on the best settings to use to photograph moving objects like rally cars.

    Weather is usual excellent with cold clear skies.

    Dave
     
  7. Johndm

    Johndm
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    Does anyone have personal experiance of the new Canon 300D with regard to shutter response time?

    Seems I really need to have some 'hands on' in a shop.

    I rarely use my (old) autofocus 35 to 80 Canon lens, but prefer a manual focus 75 to 300.

    Guess I might be better with say a 300D and newer 75 to 300 manual lens rather than an auto one?
     
  8. tomson

    tomson
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    there's a bit about the times/speeds of the 300D on dpreview it seems to be quicker than some but I dont think its ever gonna be the first choice for a sports photographer.
     
  9. woody67

    woody67
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    I think you may be better off with a smaller aperture setting to give greater depth of field, which may compensate for slow focusing.

    Alternatively, if there are any doubts on the focusing speed, then pre-focusing at the likely distance for the shot may be better.

    A slower shutter may blur the picture, but this may add to the effect. But if you are photographing speed, then a faster shutter is the norm, and this will capture flying mud and water etc. But then you need a razor sharp image, and will be at a relatively low depth of field so will need accurate focusing.

    I would be inclined to set for continuous shooting and take loads of shots and pick the best ones and bin the others. Just make sure you have some large capacity memory cards.

    One tip I remember, was to recall, or find out, where the worst bend or hump was and you can then capture all the cars as they leave the road or take flight!

    Also try and avoid "just another rally car picture" of a car zooming past. Look for something interesting.

    woody
     
  10. captain chunk

    captain chunk
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    this is the best advise anyone can take with regard to digital photography, i can fill a 256mb memory stick on a day out, i take all my photos at max res(so they can be easily cropped) and if im lucky ill get 5- 10 photos that are keepers and usually only 1-2 that i am really happy with and that require little or no photo-shopping


    chunk
     
  11. RobH27

    RobH27
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    I have played with this problem of the shutter delay and am slowly getting used to clicking the button just b4 the action starts to capture the pic I want.

    The bit I dont understand or cant get to grips with is that if I am taking pics of people just standing around talking maybe waving their arms or moving (even slowly). The pics turn out blurred. Although I understand why there is a shutter delay surely you can avoid this blurring??

    Any help appreciated.

    :)
     
  12. woody67

    woody67
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    If the whole pictuer is blurred (ie movement blur as opposed to out of focus) then you may be still moving the camera slightly between the time you press the shutter and the time the image is captured.

    If only the moving parts of the image are blurred, then it may be that what you are pre-focusing on is giving you a slow shutter setting and wider aperture - this is normal for most automatic settings.

    You should try a different auto setting to try and force a faster shutter speed, or "pre-point" at a lighter area which will then make the camera give a faster shutter speed.

    woody
     
  13. RobH27

    RobH27
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    I think you are spot on here Woody. It isnt a focus thing but the fact that I have moved the camera after I believe the shot has been taken. I use the Fuji 602 SLR and its misleading because it makes the shutter noise which leads you to believe that the pic is over but you have to remeber to wait while it reads onto the flash. I suppose it is a concept we have to get used to.

    However it is quite annoying. You can understand why professionals still opt for conventional methods.
     
  14. pinatubo

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    The blurring is probably due to camera shake.You need to use a faster shutter speed with digital cameras to compensate for the small image sensor.
     

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