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Question Should I get into vinyl?

Darrell02

Standard Member
So, I currently have a Linn Akudorik hifi system and listen to most of my music via Qubuz hi res streaming....when albums are available in hi res that is......also stream at 44.1
My question is.... Should I get into vinyl..... is the outlay going to reap benefits.... or should I stick with streaming....
Not only am I going to have to start a vinyl record collection but to get a record player to compliment my system will mean spending at least £3000 on a Linn majic LP12..... although the Akurate LP 12 is more suited, but costs £7000 I am not willing to put this outlay into something I am not sure about, although there is a up grade path to the Akurate.
I expect the vinyl to sound different, perhaps warmer, but will it be better than streaming from the likes of tidal / qubuz etc.
I am going to a linn specialists tomorrow to have a listen, but was curious as to your thoughts.....
I just wondered.... am I being silly, be happy with what I have, it does sound pretty good..... or am I about to be amazed and blown away by the quality of vinyl and a whole new world of musical happiness awaits me...
 
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gibbsy

Moderator
If you are looking to buy new vinyl releases then many of them are subject to the same compression of dynamic range, known as the loudness wars, as are CDs and downloads. Older CDs and certainly vinyl were produced with a much higher dynamic range and are therefore of a better quality. These older titles are hard to come by and are usually confined to the secondary market and many command a high premium.

New releases are still available on high quality 180g albums but again these seem to be confined to the those classic albums from several decades ago and are produced by such companies as MoFi and Analogue Productions both based in the US.

Vinyl will certainly not sound any better than CD when played on high quality players. It's more of an organic pleasure in playing vinyl, something that is tactile and playing records can be a very good way to spend a few hours. If you're looking for a better quality audio then the answer is no. I would go so far as to say that perhaps the best audio quality comes from the venerable SACD but just like quality vinyl these titles are something of a collectors expensive option.
 

Timmy C

Distinguished Member
Much as I hate answers like this I would say if you feel the need to ask then don't do it.

If you have the money and like the idea of collecting, seeking out certain pressings, going to record fairs and spending a whole day digging through crates looking for treasure, or more likely, paying over the odds for something to fill gaps in your ever growing, space consuming collection, then it can be a fun but expensive hobby. I would guess that if that interests you then you would have already become that person. I don't think it's a hobby you choose, you simply fall into it.

The only other reason I can see for doing it is nostalgia. If you grew up with records and miss the whole experience...the big artwork/lyric sheets, gatefold sleeves, the turning over to listen to side two etc then you may want to consider it. This is the only reason I have a turntable still but it's not part of my main set up and accounts for about 1% of my listening time.
 

Darrell02

Standard Member
Thanks for that Gibbsy.... it is a lot of money to spend and I wonder could it be spent elsewhere..... if at all.... I just took this silly notion to get into vinyl..... I always felt that with cd, hi res streaming that something was missing... I remember the old days with my first record player, it cost £150, a marantz. I would put on an album and listen right through rather than hopping from track to track.... and the music had a warmth that you just don’t seem to get with the digital formats.... or maybe am just misremembering how vinyl sounded back then...it was over 30 years ago.
 

mushii

Well-known Member
I have a couple friends who are 'vinyl collectors'. They play their vinyl rarities once, then it gets put away 'forever'. This is not an idiosyncrasy of one or two people, this behaviour, is apparently very normal for high end vinyl collectors. They will then buy a 'cheaper' version of the same vinyl as a daily player. Why, for me, is beyond comprehension. Music IMHO is made for listening to, but if your medium is so fragile that you cannot play what you have bought, then why bother in the first place?
If you want to listen to pre-80's vinyl, then you will probably enjoy a very different sound, than today's heavyweight recordings, which will be very similar in sound to the digital version that you have already listened to digitally.
If you are having to ask the question, should I get into vinyl, then see @Timmy C s answer.
 

Darrell02

Standard Member
Thank mushii... so the consensus is... don’t..... I’ll still take a wee plunder up tomorrow and have a listen though... just to be curious 😊
 

Timmy C

Distinguished Member
@mushii

I only have one close friend with a serious collection, as in a value north of 30k at the very minimum but for the most part, he does insist on playing all his records. Personally I can understand the collecting but not playing some stuff to preserve it's value but I guess if moneys no object then there's no need to consider the consequences. In the world of 'underground' metal, one of the most valuable records I can think of is what's commonly referred to as Bathorys 'Yellow Goat' album. It changes hands at well over a thousand quid so playing something like that and potentially eating away at it's value would have to be something only the obscenely rich would consider, when the record inside is no different from the far more common and cheap 'White Goat' version...both sounding equally awful I might add! That said, I can see why a collector of that style of music would still like to own the rare original.
 

dannnielll

Well-known Member
Collecting is a different activity than listening to music. I suspect that these people could just as easily be collecting baseball player cards, or Pokémon cards,or rare wines or vintage cars.. , depending on their age and wealth status. Just an observation,not a value judgement.
The first group of people who embraced CDs back in the day, were professional musicians,and the first sets of stuff were classical records re edited or re mastered from the archives of RCA ,EMI and DG dating back to the 1960s
 

gibbsy

Moderator
Perhaps I should have listened to my own advice. I've been buying SACDs for the last couple of years, some at a terrifying cost.
 

deantown

Distinguished Member
CD’s are the best sound for me, but I haven’t had the upgrade bug yet. I like a rummage through the CS for bargains, and I’ve found loads (in my eyes). Nothing to do with cost either. :)
 

Ormy

Member
...is the outlay going to reap benefits....

...but will it be better than streaming from the likes of tidal / qubuz etc.
The answer depends on exactly what you mean by 'benefits' and 'better'. What are you expecting or looking for?

If you're looking for better sound quality, the answer is no, don't go vinyl, see reply from @gibbsy for more details. Spend your money on speakers, room correction, room treatment instead.

If you're not looking for 'better' sound necessarily but are looking for the warm and slightly imperfect sound of vinyl with all its foibles then you could go to vinyl, but its much cheaper to achieve with some DSP, it's not hard to make digital sound exactly like vinyl with a few filters.

If what you're really looking for is more of the 'rituals' surrounding vinyl listening, carefully taking each record out of the sleeve and moving the tonearm into position, cleaning the records, displaying them in a certain way, the whole aesthetic of a turntable system, or even just plain old nostalgia because your parents had one or something, if this is what you're really after then go vinyl and don't look back.
 

Jazzabana

Member
So, I currently have a Linn Akudorik hifi system and listen to most of my music via Qubuz hi res streaming....when albums are available in hi res that is......also stream at 44.1
My question is.... Should I get into vinyl..... is the outlay going to reap benefits.... or should I stick with streaming....
Not only am I going to have to start a vinyl record collection but to get a record player to compliment my system will mean spending at least £3000 on a Linn majic LP12..... although the Akurate LP 12 is more suited, but costs £7000 I am not willing to put this outlay into something I am not sure about, although there is a up grade path to the Akurate.
I expect the vinyl to sound different, perhaps warmer, but will it be better than streaming from the likes of tidal / qubuz etc.
I am going to a linn specialists tomorrow to have a listen, but was curious as to your thoughts.....
I just wondered.... am I being silly, be happy with what I have, it does sound pretty good..... or am I about to be amazed and blown away by the quality of vinyl and a whole new world of musical happiness awaits me...
Well I would recommend you not to because it is all about what your ears used to hear.
I have a stereo hi-fi system with a turntable, 3 phono stages, an integrated amp, a streamer and an eq.
I can connect the eq to only one source because I am using integrated. And because it is convenient to listen via streaming, I have the eq connected to the streamer. As a result now I am not ok with what I am hearing on vinyl. So whether I need to switch cables back and forth or get a second eq or get an pre-amp and an power amp.
I think all you need is a pair of speakers you like, a Schiit Loki eq and interconnect cables that affects the sound the way you like. Finally an integrated or seperates that matches with your setup. Oh and a dac if you r getting seperates.
That was exactly my thought today when I was auditioning phono stages, connecting them back and forth.

Enjoi
 

musicphil

Active Member
If you are going to buy hundreds or a thousand or two of quality second hand vinyl upto say 1985 ( they are still available but watch you don't get ripped off) , then yes get your Linn. 👌
You will hear that unique vinyl sound.
But do remember all the SH vinyl you purchase will need to be cleaned. Lots of great info on YouTube regarding this.
Stay away from new 99% of new vinyl- it's digital recorded, glorified CD.
At the end of the day....you pays your money you makes your choice.
 
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DT79

Well-known Member
It’s a tough one for someone starting from scratch and contemplating spending all that money. Personally I love it. I’ve a reasonable collection of old and newer stuff and I just love the whole process. Music is a work of art and somehow interacting with the physical embodiment of that piece of art is immensely enjoyable. I get that a lot of new records come from exactly the same master as the digital version, but there is still something about the mechanics of the replay process that gives it that ‘vinyl’ sound.

What I would say is that if you start out with a high end digital system, then it can’t be done properly on the cheap. People are saying don’t do it if you want the best SQ, and I’m not going to dispute that in objective terms, but what I would say is that it’s possible to buy a good enough vinyl replay set-up that you’ll never think about whether it might sound marginally better if you were listening to the high-res download, you’ll just enjoy it and many people will prefer it. It sounds like you probably have the means to do that if you’re so inclined. Also you need a record cleaning machine - even new records are a lottery with being dirty. And there are various other bits and pieces that you need for keeping everything clean and properly adjusted.

Overall it needs a lot of money spent and a bit of work putting in (20% of that work being a chore but those are things you only have to do occasionally, and the other 80% being part and parcel of the ritual of vinyl replay which if you’re so inclined then you’ll enjoy).

On balance only you can decide. Hope you enjoy the demo, do report back.
 

drummerman

Active Member
It's inconvenient, a money pit, a space hogger, dust collector, source of many frustrations.

It looks nice, can be fun and is a tweakers dream.
 

musicphil

Active Member
It's inconvenient, a money pit, a space hogger, dust collector, source of many frustrations.

It looks nice, can be fun and is a tweakers dream.
You forgot to say it will sound fantastic too. 😁
 

Darrell02

Standard Member
It’s a tough one for someone starting from scratch and contemplating spending all that money. Personally I love it. I’ve a reasonable collection of old and newer stuff and I just love the whole process. Music is a work of art and somehow interacting with the physical embodiment of that piece of art is immensely enjoyable. I get that a lot of new records come from exactly the same master as the digital version, but there is still something about the mechanics of the replay process that gives it that ‘vinyl’ sound.

What I would say is that if you start out with a high end digital system, then it can’t be done properly on the cheap. People are saying don’t do it if you want the best SQ, and I’m not going to dispute that in objective terms, but what I would say is that it’s possible to buy a good enough vinyl replay set-up that you’ll never think about whether it might sound marginally better if you were listening to the high-res download, you’ll just enjoy it and many people will prefer it. It sounds like you probably have the means to do that if you’re so inclined. Also you need a record cleaning machine - even new records are a lottery with being dirty. And there are various other bits and pieces that you need for keeping everything clean and properly adjusted.

Overall it needs a lot of money spent and a bit of work putting in (20% of that work being a chore but those are things you only have to do occasionally, and the other 80% being part and parcel of the ritual of vinyl replay which if you’re so inclined then you’ll enjoy).

On balance only you can decide. Hope you enjoy the demo, do report back.
 

Darrell02

Standard Member
Thanks dt79.... I think you have put into words why am thinking of going the vinyl route. My current system, Home review, I guess would be considered high end at near £16000 for the speakers alone...and even if I do go vinyl the system would change it to didital 198/24 before sending to the speakers...... so many things to the no about...... will listen to the lp12 on the Akudorik today and make a decision based on what my ears tell me.....
 

Darrell02

Standard Member
I did it..... £3000 emptied out of my bank account..... bread and water for next year!!!!! I purchased 3 albums..... £90!!! Last album I bought 30 years ago cost me £7!!!!!
 

Ascotbilly

Active Member
First heard the LP12 on a full spend's Linn system at one of their demo's 25 years ago - REM Monster and its still the best sound I've ever heard...Enjoy the impending money pit !
BTW - What were the LP's ?
 

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