should I buy a DVD recorder for editing on the PC

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alexdrawbridge

Guest
Hi this is my first thread.

I need to edit broadcast television on my PC in Adobe Premiere. I thought about taking it straight from my video, which is s-video, so good quality, but I also have sky and wondered should I buy a DVD recorder and keep the process completely digital for best quality.

Thanks Alex :)
 
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chrisnewbold

Guest
If you capture on your pc it will be AVI format - great quality and completely editable. You then need to export as mpeg (or as AVI and use some recoding software to get it to mpeg, then author it etc to get it onto DVD. Results will depend on the quality of the original vcr recording and mpeg encoder

Alternatively a dvd recorder will record straight to mpeg in very good quality but you then have to import this to premiere -does premiere support importing of VOBs from a a DVD? - then you may not get frame accurate editing as mpeg is not a frame by frame format. So it may be more problematical to edit than method 1. You could try to import a prerecorded dvd to adobe to see how it works before deciding.
 
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alexdrawbridge

Guest
That's a good idea, :thumbsup: I'll do some tests on a DVD first and see if I can get it working before buying one, as you say the other method still produces high quality editing too.

Thanks for your response

Alex
 

musukebba

Active Member
chrisnewbold said:
...you may not get frame accurate editing as mpeg is not a frame by frame format.
I'm afraid this isn't true - PAL MPEG2 is 25 fps, and with the right software (eg Womble products) you can edit MPEG2 on a frame-accurate basis. Thus Premiere may be the limitation.
 
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chrisnewbold

Guest
Well it's a compression format, where the frame data is encoded into data packets etc and is not as easy to edit as AVI which is a true frame by frame format. I've heard variable results from people who have tried to edit in mpeg with sync problems and inaccurate results so would still be cautious about doing a lot of editing in mpeg only. It's not what it was designed for.
 

musukebba

Active Member
chrisnewbold said:
Well it's a compression format, where the frame data is encoded into data packets etc and is not as easy to edit as AVI which is a true frame by frame format.
Hmmm... unfortunately the inaccuracy continues. MPEG2 recorded on a DVD is a program stream, in whole frames, and not packetised at all. You'll find .avi is a Microsoft container, not a format as such, and can contain a number of different codec strategies so I don't know that we're comparing the same thing.

chrisnewbold said:
I've heard variable results from people who have tried to edit in mpeg with sync problems and inaccurate results so would still be cautious about doing a lot of editing in mpeg only. It's not what it was designed for.
No, but neither was MPEG4. Both this and MPEG2 were designed for efficient transport streaming over different physical barriers.

My experience is that AV sync problems are more widely reported with MPEG4 .avi files.
 
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alexdrawbridge

Guest
Thanks.

I'll have a try with womble too - I had n't heard of it before.

Does anyone know some good books or magazines to learn more about compression, file formats and editing.

Alex
 

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