1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Sharp View Mode: Dot by Dot (for PC) - what does this mean exactly?

Discussion in 'LCD & LED LCD TVs' started by ranguyen, Sep 3, 2005.

  1. ranguyen

    ranguyen
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    I ran across the 3 sharp 1080p lcd tv's where the description contains:
    "View Modes: Sidebar, Smart Stretch, Stretch, Zoom, Dot by Dot (for PC)"
    for the Sharp LC-45GD6U, LC-45GD4U, and LC-45GX6U

    The Dot by Dot sounds like it means that it will take a pc resolution of 1920x1080 without scaling. Does anybody have one of these lcd's and can verify this is true? Also how does the image look? Is it really a 1:1 mapping of pixels?

    I googled "sharp dot by dot" and there was not a lot of information about it.

    If it really does do what I think it does, then it would be exactly what I'm looking for.

    On a side note, what do you think the plusses and minuses of having a break out box are?
     
  2. David Mackenzie

    David Mackenzie
    Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2003
    Messages:
    10,213
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Location:
    Glasgow, UK
    Ratings:
    +1,310
    Dot by Dot means 1:1 mapping, yes - no scaling.
     
  3. ranguyen

    ranguyen
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    So i've read in some reviews that these tv's only allow a pc input of 1280x1024 which isn't 16:9 and isn't a 1:1 mapping. If it is a 1:1 mapping, then it doesn't fill the entire screen right?

    Anybody own one of these and can verify this?
     
  4. pjskel

    pjskel
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2004
    Messages:
    2,676
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    UK
    Ratings:
    +124
    1:1 means exactly that - x pixels across and x pixels down based on the native resolution of the panel, and a video card that has drivers accomodating the native resolution. If not, then typically Powerstrip for PC users. Macs will be able to ascertain the displays native resolution and supported resolutions and works effortlessly.
    If the display doesn't have the capability to run native resolution with the PC input, then it'll either do a 1:1 mapping of it's highest supported resolution or alternatively, scale one of the supported resolutions to that of the panel's - typically 1280x768, which gets widened to 1366.
     
  5. ianh64

    ianh64
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2004
    Messages:
    2,233
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    51
    Location:
    SW London/Surrey borders
    Ratings:
    +63
    The SHarp manuals use to be available on the internet and probably still are - I can't remember exactly where they were. I did however download the 45" version. Its description for dot for dot is:

    So that indicates that 1080i is available, however it then goes on to omit the mode from the PC compatbility chart - presumably because it is a video resolution or the PC modes were cut and pasted from the 1366x768 models.

    If you want to search for the manual, the filename that I have is LC45GD1E221.PDF and is about 6MB in size.

    -Ian
     
  6. Doctor Hades

    Doctor Hades
    Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2005
    Messages:
    3,261
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Location:
    East Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +308
    I have a question but it's a bit off-topic...

    You can get LCDs that have resolutions of 1920x1080, right, but they can only disaply 1080i, why? Surely with that resolution they should be able to do 1080p? And what is the difference between 1080i and 1080p anyway? 1080i doesn't flicker like 480i does on a normal interlaced TV so doesn't it look exactly the same as 1080p? :confused:
     
  7. ianh64

    ianh64
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2004
    Messages:
    2,233
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    51
    Location:
    SW London/Surrey borders
    Ratings:
    +63
    I think quite simply it is cost. Whilst 1080p has been part of the ATSC rates for broadcast transmission since 1995, the cost implications are too great until new chips that integrate 1080p functionality start becoming commonly available. These are expected to start filtering through from 2006. For instance, the 1080p upgrade to the Sony Qualia 004 projector is $3000 alone.

    -Ian
     
  8. pjskel

    pjskel
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2004
    Messages:
    2,676
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    UK
    Ratings:
    +124
    Yes, but is $3K realistic or are Sony having a laugh considering if you can afford to consider the Qualia, you can and will probably be able to afford the asking price of the 1080p upgrade?
    I agree it is a cost based issue, but the real cost isn't THAT much, but not doing it now, buys the manufacturers the option to include it in later new models to perpetuate the notion they are advancing technology rather than making sure they have something to crow about to guarantee more sales. That's not cynical, just reality of the commercialised world in which we now live.
     

Share This Page

Loading...