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Sharp 10000

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by JD, Mar 22, 2003.

  1. JD

    JD
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    Has anyone seen one of these in action? I'm thinking of buying one direct from Japan(because of price). Seen Sim etc, is it much different?
     
  2. Cornelius

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  3. JD

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    Thanx Cornelius, sounds good, how you getting on with yours?
     
  4. WSquared

    WSquared
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    Hello,
    Some info for helping you make your decision.

    The grayscale tracking (to D65) of the Sim2's are fairly interactive with the contrast setting. So, the chances of having accurate D65 tracking even once setting contrast & brightness correctly are slim. With an ISF calibration, you can achieve very good tracking, but don't adjust the contrast afterwards without knowing the values to set them back to. Also, the HT300 & 300plus, only have 2 different master grayscale/color temp memories definable in the service menu. One is for interlaced(15.75kHz) and one for progressive(31.5kHz).

    With the Z10000(and the 9000), I would not recommend using the economy mode as it is makes it more difficult to achieve accurate D65 grayscale tracking, not to mention the image doesn't have as much punch. Good D65 can be achieved with economy power-save mode turned OFF.

    Other projectors based on the HD2 chip include the Infocus 7200 and Marantz VP12S2, but it may have a few problems as reported by one of the ISF instructors in the US. He says, "it clips or crushes white at very low contrast levels. Also the lens is introducing some barrel distortion." The contrast issue may have been a firmware problem or something to do with the DVD player he was using. Personally, I have not calibrated one yet. However, I have had a chance to play around in the menus, which allow for a large degree of tweaking.

    The first thing is that the Marantz 12S2 is one of the best non-CRT projectors in the video memories department. 12 separate memory presets can be saved using 3 different pre-set gamma curves and one definable gamma curve. Each of the memories can be calibrated to D65, although you would never need to do that. There have been no bad reports from the calibrators that have calibrated these. The one criticism from journalists is that the light output isn't that high. I'm hoping to calibrate a 12S2 very soon. A local dealer that I do some work with is expecting one to be delivered soon for me to calibrate to allow us to evaluate it properly.

    One thing I would suggest for you to keep in mind when looking at various projectors is how usable it is.
    Does it have memories that can be defined for all parameters (including grayscale/color temp) and selected with the touch of a button?
    Is there a video memory hierarchy?
    How does each video memory link to grayscale/color temp and gamma memories?

    These things are useful to allow you to calibrate the best picture for different lighting conditions, video standards, etc.
    Discrete codes for each video memory also allow for some level of automation and correct selection of memory pre-sets.

    FYI, there is a new relative to the T.I. HD2 chip coming out for the European market. I think it is due in the third quarter of this calendar year. It is native widescreen PAL resolution, 1024 x 576. Therefore, only de-interlacing is required, no scaling. This should be a cheaper projector to produce. It will have the contrast characteristics of the HD2 because it will also have a black coloured non-reflective substrate under the micro-mirrors. Since no scaling is required, there should be no artifacts caused by scaling. It is an interesting proposition.

    [Edit for grammar mistake.]

    Happy hunting.
     

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