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See where widescreen began!

Discussion in 'TV Show Forum' started by delta, Mar 10, 2002.

  1. delta

    delta
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    This is where widescreen began! Although many trials of widescreen processes had been
    made from the 1920’s onward, it was in 1952 that the shape of the cinema screen was to
    change forever, and, ultimately, our tv screens. Using an unique three-strip, three projector
    system Cinerama was launched with the movie, ‘This is Cinerama’! It was the first of seven
    films made using this system, the last being the magnificent, ‘How The West Was Won’, in
    1962. After that, single lens Cinerama took over and ‘It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World‘ was
    premiered in 70mm Cinerama. However the clarity and depth of focus that was achieved in
    the original films was lost in the single lens system and because of the high cost and limited
    subjects suitable for making movies in three-strip Cinerama, the system died.

    But it is back! And has been since the National Museum of Photography, Film and Television
    in Bradford installed an original Cinerama system in it’s Pictureville cinema some ten years
    ago. The equipment and a special louvered screen were retrieved from various sources
    around the world and completely restored. Now, at 1.30pm every first Saturday of the month,
    you can see the first Cinerama film in all its glory, ‘This is Cinerama’ is back complete with its
    original 6-track soundtrack.

    However, as a part of the Bradford Film Festival which runs from 8-23 March, a celebration
    of 50 years of Cinerama is being presented as part of the annual ‘Widescreen Weekend’
    15-17 March. Amongst the films being shown are six Cinerama movies, ‘This Is Cinerama’,
    ‘Cinerama Holiday’, Cinerama’s Seven Wonders of the World’, and ‘How The West Was
    Won’ are all original three-strip presentations and ‘2001 - A Space Odyssey’ and ‘Patton: Lust
    for Glory’ are being presented in 70mm on the Cinerama screen.

    This is an unique occasion and well worth a visit to the only surviving true Cinerama theatre
    in the world! If widescreen cinema had not taken off, then it is unlikely we would now all be
    enjoying widescreen tv.

    For more information on the Pictureville cinema and the Museum go to:

    http://www.nmpft.org.uk/home.asp

    For a wealth of information and illustrations on the development of Cinerama and all the
    other widescreen processes from CinemaScope to Todd-AO, go to the splendid on-line
    American Widescreen Museum at:

    http://www.widescreenmuseum.com/widescreen/wingcr1.htm


    __________________
    David
     
  2. Zone

    Zone
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    Good post David :)

    I work in Bradford and have been to the Museum (bit unfair calling it that as I think it makes it sound old and musty which it isn't) several times to watch the odd film.
    Also as an aside the quality of the picture/sound far exceeds that of your local multiplex and the quality of movie goer is generally more respectful than that of their Cineworld counterparts.
    Its an unusal experience at first watching a deeply curved screen that almost seems to surround you, but its an experience everyone should try at least once, you'll never look at a traditional cinema screen in the same light again.
    2001 for me I think, looks amazing.

    Si
     
  3. delta

    delta
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    Thanks Zone, you are quite right!

    Incidentally the 'hot seat' for optimum involvement is D15. Pictureville cinema is unique in that it is equipped for presenting all cinematic formats on film or video that have been introduced since movie making began. In front of the Cinerama screen,which is curtained, is a large screen which is lowered into place for all other film format presentations. The Cinerama screen is used for many 70mm showings too. It is unusual in that because the screen is deeply curved it is constucted from narrow vertical strips of sceen material, (like a venetian blind on its side), which allows light to pass through and thus prevent reflected light bouncing from one side of the screen to the other - it simply passes through the louvres.

    Pictureville is a remarkable cinema being very relaxing and totally involving. And of course, there is the IMAX cinema which is used for all kinds of presentaions including IMAX 3D. The smaller Cubby Broccoli cinema is cosy and specialises in world cinema.
     
  4. Brianjhussey

    Brianjhussey
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    I remember seeing 'This is Cinerama' in Dublin in the early 60s and being 'blown away' by the experience.
    Having seen the first Cinemascope movie-- The Robe, I think-- a decade earlier and experienced all future movies being made in a similar format, I was looking forward to the 'Cinerama' experience becoming the norm. Sadly, it was not to be.

    Brian.
     

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