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SD VIDEO broadcasts?

newavfan

Active Member
Hi,
What programmes are broadcast in SD video?
I want to know which shows pq will not improve with a Lumagen HDP.
For example, will Corrie be one? (SWMBO watches every episode!).
What proportion of Sky SD broadcasts are in video mode?
Sorry about the stupid questions but best be informed before the purchase fait acomplis is delivered to the boss!:smashin:
 

NicolasB

Distinguished Member
Hi,
What programmes are broadcast in SD video?
I want to know which shows pq will not improve with a Lumagen HDP.
For example, will Corrie be one? (SWMBO watches every episode!).
What proportion of Sky SD broadcasts are in video mode?
Sorry about the stupid questions but best be informed before the purchase fait acomplis is delivered to the boss!:smashin:
The fact that something is an SD video source doesn't necessarily mean that it won't be improved by a Lumagen HDP. The lack of diagonal filtering on SD video is an issue sometimes; but much of the time it really isn't visible. And the superior scaling of the Lumagen, plus its improved ability to distinguish between video and film, may well mean that even video sources will look better.

To answer your question, video sources will include anything broadcast live (or nearly live), pretty much anything made entirely in a studio, and lower-budget dramas, especially those made in Britain. So, things like the news, sporting events, Casualty, Blue Peter, or soap operas. Expensive American shows like 24 or Lost are shot on film, and so are higher-budget British productions, especially those shot on location rather than in the studio.

Some programmes are a mixture of film and video. "Making of" documentaries are basically video, but the clips inside them are usually film. Older shows like classic Doctor Who or Blake's Seven were shot on video for the indoors, in-studio bits, but on film for the outdoor location shots. And some shows have the actors shot on film but post-production special effects (like CGI) done as video.
 

newavfan

Active Member
Thanks NicolasB..a comprehensive reply.
It is proving really hard to get a simple straight answer on the hdp's impact on ordinary SD video material.
Do any hdp owners have anything to say?
Cheers
 

NonPayingMember

Previously Liam @ Prog AV
Go and see one. It is very over-exagerrated in these forums, and just the fact that it gets whipped up in conversation makes people think the Vision range is a no go area when in fact it is the biggest bargain in the VP market! DEMO DEMO DEMO to see what SD should really look like on your display
 

Ianfromnotts

Well-known Member
There is no way that I could go back to none scaled TV. My HDP fed with the HDMI output on the HD box makes most SKY SD very watchable - on a 92" wide screen.

Some of the low bit rate channels the obscure ones that few people watch usually and old 70s shows are still a bit dodgy but overall its very good.

Cant say that the Sky HD box RGBS feed looks that great but it was ok with my old sky + box or maybe its just because I didn't have the hdmi output to compare with
 

Neophasis

Active Member
I used to own both the Lumagen Vision HDP and the Iscan VP50 but ended up with the Crystalio VPS-2300 due to it's superior picture quality on SD video broadcasts which i watch mostly.

The VP50 was closest the Crystalio but the Lumagen was far behind in performance on SD video.

My next processor will be the Crystalio II, they have the edge on SD.
 

newavfan

Active Member
Thanks guys.
I need to demo.:smashin:
 

NicolasB

Distinguished Member
Thanks NicolasB..a comprehensive reply.
It is proving really hard to get a simple straight answer on the hdp's impact on ordinary SD video material.
Do any hdp owners have anything to say?
Cheers
As an HDP owner I would say that, overall, SD video looks better with the HDP than without. The main benefit is in the scaling: it does it in a way that doesn't emphasise compression artefacts such as macro-blocking (which most scaling algorithms do). The decision you need to make is not "should I buy an HDP or not?" it is "should I buy an HDP or some other scaler?" If much of what you watch is SD video then something like a VP50 might be a better bet - but you'd lose the HDP's superior scaling (thus reducing the benefit for film sources) and also lose its callibration / colour-correction abilities.
 

newavfan

Active Member
I watch as much sky HD as I can find & the wife watches soaps (sd video) so I want a VP with diverse capabilities.
As great as the Radiance is swmbo would never agree to a £3k box!

NicolasB..How much of a subjective improvement does the hdp have on SD video? Is it enough for swmbo to notice, let alone me?

Thanks
 

NicolasB

Distinguished Member
NicolasB..How much of a subjective improvement does the hdp have on SD video? Is it enough for swmbo to notice, let alone me?
Erm... given that it's "subjective", by definition you probably won't agree with my assessment. :)

I'd say the difference is probably subtle enough that you wouldn't notice it when you switch, but you'd notice it if you switched back again: you'd suddenly start having your attention grabbed by compression artefacts and realise that the HDP had actually been quietly de-emphasising them without drawing attention to the fact.

Having said that, I don't watch football. :) If I did, I might notice it more - the lines on the pitch really show up the lack of diagonal filtering. A switch between film and video mode when the camera is stationary is also quite visible. There are a few other things that show it up, too, like the "ticker" at the bottom of the screen on BBC News 24. Video deinterlacing issues are much less noticeable in a picture which doesn't have a lot of diagonal straight lines in.

It also depends on (for example) whether you get some benefit from the HDP's colour correction abilities. If your greyscale is significantly off and the HDP is used to correct it, that will significantly improve viewing for all material. The downside there is that callibrating the greyscale yourself is a major undertaking, so you really need to factor in an extra £300 to get a professional ISF callibrator in to do it for you. If your greyscale happens to be nearly perfect already then you won't get any added benefit from this, and so the HDP will make less difference.
 

Neophasis

Active Member
Do remember that both Crystalio and Lumagen do offer full control of all parameters while Iscans are more PnP and offer less control of the picture and more suited to the mass market.

The Crystalio is pretty hard to set up if you are not used to it and their menu on the VPS-2300 is a bit ackward as you don't have any menu on the display to watch, but you have everything you can dream of when it comes to adjust things.
 

Eitzel

Active Member

Ianfromnotts

Well-known Member
Lets not forget the pennies here, the original question was about the HDP which you can pick up in the classifieds for about £500, The last 2300 went for about the same. A VP50 might be go for tad more but I guess a Radiance, if one ever came up right now, would go for nearer £2000 and might be a little more difficult to get the spend approved
 

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