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screens

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by tonyducks, Apr 16, 2001.

  1. tonyducks

    tonyducks
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    in jessops you can get 6ft square screens for 80 quid. is there any difference between that and a £250 electric one?
     
  2. Chris Frost

    Chris Frost
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    Yes

    Regards
     
  3. Nic Rhodes

    Nic Rhodes
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    Chris don't beat around the bush, say what you really mean!
     
  4. Guest

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    Come on, the man is asking for help!

    I know nothing about screens, but I can tell you this...

    I would suspect that for your money you would get a totally square screen, I mean 1:1 and not 4:3, which I think is designed for photo slides.

    You sound like you are in the same boat as me. Trying to get into the Home Cinema game but have no/little cash. I made may own screen for use at work (work is the only place I get the play with these wonderful pieces of kit). Piece of paper from an A0 roll covered in a matt film (again from an A0 rolled, the stuff from plotters) pinned to a timber frame made of 2"x2" timbers with a border of 30x30 beading around the edge painted matt black, size about 5 foot, with a 16:9 ratio. When it gets dirty I just put in a new peice of paper.

    I expect some-one will tell you about "gain" which I am sure would add to the viewing experience, but for about £10 give it a go!

    MEAT
     
  5. GaryG

    GaryG
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    I used to have one of those Jessops screens, the reflective properties of the screen material is suprisingly good. I actually took it along to a dealer to compare it with their range of manual and electic screens that I was interested in. At the time I ended up keeping the Jessop and put the money towards a better projector instead.
     
  6. Chris Frost

    Chris Frost
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    Sorry guys, I was feeling playful and just couldn't resist the one word answer.

    Tony,
    If your buget is £80 then the Jessops screen might work well for you.

    Comparing screens sight unseen is tricky, but there are a few pointers to look for when evaluating your options.

    Cheap screen - designed for slide/cine film projection so likely to be square format rather than a 4:3 video format. Probably doesn't have the black borders which help to frame the video picture on a better quality screen. Designed for light duty use rather than the more heavy duty cycle of daily viewing, so made of lighter weight materials with a less sturdy construction. Screen surface often made of a thin (glossy)plastic sheet to keep weight down, this means you'll probably see the L & R edges curl in and you may get a hot spot/glare from the centre of the image. Possibilty of ripples in the surface due to uneven tensioning.

    Electric screens - not all are made to the same quality, but a good electric screen should use a heavy weight screen surface that lies flat aided by a weighted bar on the bottom to provide tension. It would have black borders L,R & Bottom, with a either a black case or black top edge border. It is useful if the drop length is adjustable so that LCD/DLP projector images can be framed correctly. It should be 4:3 or 16:9 video format as standard. The screen surface will be designed for video projection - i.e. matt white with some form of moderate gain (1.2~1.3) to give even illumination without hot spotting.

    Screens are often overlooked when buying a projector, but since you'll probably keep it for a long time it's worth investing in something that's right from day one. Gordon Fraser gives some good advice in the Articles section of this forum.

    Hope this helps.

    Good luck.
     
  7. gedo

    gedo
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    Guys, everyone is missing the most obvious question.....Where can you get an Electric screen for £250 !!

    Gedo
     
  8. squid

    squid
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    i would'nt mind knowing as well

    now that would make a nice bargain . anyone know where we can find these £250 elec screens are

    i have the credit card on standby
     
  9. uncle eric

    uncle eric
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    Squid,
    In answer to your question, I have a very nice OWL electric screen with Black borders (around 6ft) which I bought for around 600.00 pounds a while ago for a relative (long story).
    Anyway, brand new in a box 300.00 (sorry, not 250.00 but close)
    Eric
     

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