screen sensitivity DLP question

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by Grover the Nate, Mar 10, 2018.

  1. Grover the Nate

    Grover the Nate
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    I was hit by a car a few years ago and had a traumatic brain injury. As a result, I'm very sensitive to LCD screens (phones, computers), which quickly give me fatigue/headaches. I'm also somewhat sensitive to TVs. I am fine watching a movie in a movie theater.

    I have been looking into getting a projector, because I think it would be possible for me to watch movies with one without too much of a problem. (I am very sensitive to bright light--and thought I understand a home projector will be a brighter than a movie theater projector, it won't be as bright as a TV or computer screen.) I don't know how much the screen refresh is contributing but it might be? I don't know the terminology very well, I apologize.

    I know that people are sensitive to the older, slower three chip DLP projectors. I was wondering if there is any reason to think one would be sensitive to a newer 6X speed projector. (I'm looking at the
    BenQ DLP HD 1080p Projector (HT2050)) Would an LCD projector make more sense?

    I know it would make sense sit sit and watch a movie on one and see, but I don't have any way to do that. I'd appreciate any thoughts/ideas people have.
     
  2. Vila

    Vila
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    Your best bet is probably just to go view one as these types of DLP's are fairly readily available at fairly mainstream dealers like Richer Sounds etc.

    Peoples complaints about DLP are the Rainbow effect, it seems to be something that people either notice or they don't. Personally i do and have found all single chip DLP projectors exhibit it that I've seen.

    How this relates -or doesn't- to your needs it a bit too much to speculate on really.

    Most cinema's these days do used DLP projectors but use 3 chip models - so no colour wheel.
    Unfortunately 3 chip DLP projectors are virtually unavailable at affordable prices for consumer use.

    Some cinemas instead use Sony's SXRD panels which is basically the same technology that JVC use.

    If you find you dont get on with the DLP's it might also be worth looking at LCD projectors and LCOS/SXRD projectors to see how you get on with them.
     
  3. jfinnie

    jfinnie
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    It is hard to know what bit you are sensitive to; DLP tech in projection might be worse for you than LCD. LCD in projection is different to LCD in phones as the backlight is a discharge lamp instead of typically a quickly flickering LED. Many still see rainbows on 6 segment colour wheels. To cut the brightness on either kind you can simply strap a photographic ND filter onto the lens, which might help in your situation.

    If you can't get demo, maybe best to buy via the internet and try in your own home using the distance selling regs.
     
  4. Grover the Nate

    Grover the Nate
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    I was curious, as I've looked at the lumen ratings of different projectors, whether there is a way to reduce their brightness by using a menu, or if each projector has a preset brightness it projects at. Is the only way to reduce brightness to use a ND filter?

    Yeah I had wondered if the flickering on DLP would bother me, and if the newer high speed projectors would be better, because the rate would be too fast to be perceived even unconsciously, or worse, because of the very fast flickering.
     
  5. jfinnie

    jfinnie
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    It sounds like from your initial post you probably have particular circumstances which mean that the generalities may not apply. Projector lamps themselves can also flicker a bit some times as they aren't like a typical lightbulb with a filament - the light you see is a burning arc between two electrodes and the position of the arc on those electrodes can move around a little, causing some flicker.

    I think the consensus is that for typical viewers the wheels with more segments do reduce rainbows, and for some viewers this gets them from unacceptable to OK.

    By far the calmest, least flickery image I've seen has been on the Epson laser 3 chip reflective LCD unit, but it is pricey at close to 6K. There is a cheaper 3 chip laser short throw Epson on the way, which might be good.

    You can reduce the peak brightness artificially in most display devices by reducing contrast, but it does cost some quality. You can also reduce brightness by making the image bigger. There are usually lamp modes available which can reduce brightness, and an aperture mechanism to close off the light getting through the lens in higher end projectors, though these may still be quite bright depending on application (brightness is a function of light output and the size / gain of screen). A grey screen can also reduce brightness, with a useful contrast boost.
     
  6. Barcoing Mad

    Barcoing Mad
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    You can also project onto a grey screen as opposed to a white one to reduce overall brightness.

    Of all the PJ technologies, I'd think single chip DLP is the worse one for you.

    Is the problem aggravated by sitting closer to a screen? At least with a PJ, you can sit further away and experiment with zooming the image. You may find a given combination the most comfortable.
     
  7. ShanePJ

    ShanePJ
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    With what you have said, an ND2 filter will help in reducing the brightness, but if you are fine at the cinema, then I don't think this will do to much as the projectors at the cinema tend to be quite a bit brighter than domestic ones.

    I would certainly look at an LCD, D-ILA and SXRD technologies using traditional lamp. With SXRD and D-ILA technology, you can manually set the aperture to reduce the brightness whereas with LCD its more down to the basic settings.

    As has been mentioned, ensure you get the right type of projection screen. Maybe look at a grey screen for your brain injury as this will take a little of the glare of the image. Ensure it isn't two small as the a smaller surface area will increase the return light output into the room thus making the viewing image too bright.

    Now depending upon how sensitive your eyes have become, you could try a few trick which used to work with people who suffered with the rainbow effect on DLP projectors. This was to have very dim lights to the rear of the room. It could also be what is helping you at the cinema as they always leave the lights on.

    Remember, projectors produce poor images during the daytime, also if the sun is shining its beaming light into the room in the same direction as your projector is sending its beam to the screen, the image will be obliterated as the light output from the projector cannot compete with that of our sun.
     
  8. Grover the Nate

    Grover the Nate
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    I think I will try something other than DLP. For under 1000 USD it sounds as if LCD is what makes sense. I do worry that they tend to run on the brighter side. It seems by using eco and cinema modes some projectors will get down to 1200 lumens. If that's too bright I can try a ND filter. I was given a white screen, and I want to try to use it since I have it, (it was easy to hang in my tiny room, which has blue walls so I can't commit the sacrilege of projecting on to them) but it is good to know that a grey screen is an option.
    I was looking at the Epson HOME CINEMA 2040. Are there other projectors that I should look at as well, or are there reasons why that model doesn't make sense?
    Thanks everyone for the responses.
     
  9. Mark_a

    Mark_a
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    Most projectors also have an economy mode setting which drops the light output and prolongs the bulb life (or laser). Also has the benefit of reducing the cooling fan speed and noise. Unfortunately you can really only get away with it in a fully darkened room.
     

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