Screen Calibration

Discussion in 'OLED TVs Forum' started by rjames1701, Dec 1, 2018.

  1. rjames1701

    rjames1701
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    hi, I read these forums with absolute fascination with the knowledge you guys have and although I too have always had an interest in TVs for many years cannot hold a candle to your knowledge.

    screen burn scares me a little and whilst I very much like the look of the AF9 this subject still concerns me.

    I have had my panny 55vt65 plasma for over 5 years with over 9999 hours clocked without a hint of screen burn. The one thing I did however was to get the screen calibrated. It took a full day to calibrate which also included the 3d as well as my sound system.

    Would having, for example, the AF9 calibrated reduce the potential for screen burn? I have a seven year old who still loves her children's channels and would never stop her from watching for as long I see fit not the TV's "misuse" policy.

    Are most TVs that exhibit screen burn already calibrated. Is it just the nature of the tech used or just down to luck as to what panel you get of the conveyor belt?
     
  2. scarty16

    scarty16
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    I agree, my OLED LG 960v, 2015. calibrated & no issues.

    My view (simplistic) is that people with screen burn on non-calibrated screens are due to owners trying to fix issues using contrast and brightness and tints etc using the standard user controls which ultimately don't work and they exacerbate the issues due to the underlying imprecise/calibration out of the box.

    We watch cartoons, Sky news, sports news football, 8 hrs of PS4 each day at the weekend etc etc, all the normal culprits, and no issues.

    in short get it calibrated is my motto. its a one off cost and could save you hours of heart ache and pain, returns and ultimately you get a better picture quality as well.
     
  3. rjames1701

    rjames1701
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    Glad I’m not alone. Put aside a couple of hundred quid from your budget and get the best out of your pride and joy. There are of course those who will argue that there is no better calibrator than your eyes but surely there are tweaks that even the eye cannot pick up and will still extend the life of your tv.
     
  4. GadgetObsessed

    GadgetObsessed
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    Personally, having calibrated my own sets with a colour meter I don't really see why calibration would prevent screen burn. There is nothing magical about calibration and there is nothing that I can think of that "the eye cannot pick up and will extend the life of your TV"

    Calibration will only help if you choose to run the set much brighter or with much more saturated (i.e. unnatural) colours than a calibrated set would have. However, technically there is no real reason for a calibrated set to be dimmer. You would normally have two calibrated sets of settings - one for nigh time viewing (e.g. SDR peak white of around 120nits) and one for daytime viewing in a brighter room (e.g. 200 nits.)

    Personally, I have assumed that the reasons that people who have had their sets calibrated are probably less likely to get screen burn because they are:
    (1) More aware of screen burn issues and likely to be a bit more cautious
    (2) More likely to watch more film content - and so watch less channels that are likely to cause issues
    (3) More likely to have a TV/cinema room which isn't used as a workhorse set for the family to have on 10 hours a day

    Of course there will be people with calibrated sets who do not match any of the above who have never had screenburn issues and who may ascribe their situation solely to the calibration.
     
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  5. scarty16

    scarty16
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    (1) More aware of screen burn issues and likely to be a bit more cautious - No, I watch/use teh TV when I want and how I want.
    (2) More likely to watch more film content - and so watch less channels that are likely to cause issues - No, see description above.
    (3) More likely to have a TV/cinema room which isn't used as a workhorse set for the family to have on 10 hours a da - No, more like 20 hours a day, only TV downstairs.

     
  6. GadgetObsessed

    GadgetObsessed
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    Blimey I am surprised that anyone has time to watch TV for 20 hours a day. Then again some people just seem to have the TV on from when they get up to when they go to sleep.

    As I said these points will not apply to everyone. Irrespective screen burn is an issue and calibration in no way implies protection from screen burn
     
  7. scarty16

    scarty16
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    Yep, boy child gets up and early at the weekend massive PS4 sessions followed by sky sports, girl child then jumps in for a netflix sesh, and then evening viewing with her indoors until the early hours.
     
  8. Lrehcsa

    Lrehcsa
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    I don't see how calibration would avoid screen burn either and I've had my last two TV's calibrated, it's still well worth it for getting the very best picture quality out of your investment
     
  9. scarty16

    scarty16
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    Again in my simple world, if your uncalibrated screen has red that is too bright, and your calibrated screen has red brightness set to the correct levels, which one is more likely to result in screen burn?
     

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