Screen Burn

y2afuk

Active Member
Looking to buy LG OLED55B9PLA but the screen burn issues are putting me off spending £1k on it. What’s everyone’s experience with the set?
 
No burn-in for me.
 

Unopinionated

Active Member
If you fear burn in do not buy an OLED TV. Life is to short to be anxious and have to babysit your TV.

The professional TV Reviewers opinions can't be trusted. They are in on a big conspiracy with LG to minimize the OLED Burn In issue. Professional TV reviewers have to suck up to LG in order to get special recognition at CES. What a bunch of dishonest professional reviewers. This is why I always trust the You Tube self proclaimed OLED Burn In "Experts" instead of the professional reviewers.

Curry's and all of the other stores that sell TVs are in on a big conspiracy. They know that a huge number of their TVs are returned for OLED Burn In and they don't report it to the general public. What a bunch of dishonest store owners. This is why I always trust the You Tube self proclaimed OLED Burn In "Experts" instead of the store owners.

Youtube is full of people claiming to be “experts” on the subject of OLED Burn In. These OLED Burn In “Activists/Experts” tend to disagree with the professional TV reviewers quoted below.

From Rtings.com*
Although we don't expect most people who watch varied content to have any issues, OLED TVs, such as the LG OLED C9 do have the possibility of experiencing burn in.

Vincent Teoh
OLED Burn In Risk is Overblown

Consumer Reports
Their statistical data shows that OLED Burn In is such a rare occurence that they don't even mention it as anything to be concerned with except for some 2015 OLED TVs.
Data on 97,554 TVs owned by Consumer Reports members who purchased a new set between 2010 and 2018 has been collected. Many of these TVs are OLEDs. If Burn In was a common problem I am sure Consumer Reports would mention it.

Geoffrey Morrison and David Katzmaier of CNET
If you vary your TV viewing habits like most people, however, it won't be an issue. Even so, caveat emptor. Or as Caesar once said, "Conscientiam autem ardeat sed non anxius" (be aware of burn-in, but not concerned).

John Archer of Forbes
Occurrences of permanent screen burn in the real consumer world are now and will continue to be rare.

Atomicus of Chichester
One thing that seems abundantly apparent is that while by no means should it be suggested that burn-in doesn't exist, the problem is nowhere near as widespread or as much a certainty as some people fear and/or lead others to believe.

Useful facts from dodgexander:
  • The risk of burn in with OLEDs is actually less than it was in the Plasma days. It's no more likely to happen now than then.
  • Its not only OLEDs that can suffer from burn in, abuse any type of display (even LCD) and you can get burn in. Just take a look at some of the old LCDs in pubs.
  • Youtube is full of people claiming to be experts and misleading people, do not believe everything you watch on Youtube. I don't want to name and shame but there are some really laughable content creators out there who literally will say anything to make a few extra views. Do not believe their rubbish! I am sure if you read this, you know the kind of channels I am talking about.
 
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Unopinionated

Active Member
Burn in has not been an issue for at least two generations now.

I have a C8 as my gaming screen and it gets used daily. No issues whatsoever, unlike the B6 that it replaced which did have some issues around image retention.

But anyway, there will always be people believe ‘what they’ve heard’ even when faced with incontrovertible truth. It’s why we have anti-vacciners and flat earthers
There are people who have experienced burn in with 2017 and older OLED models.

There are many people who have used there 2017 and older OLED TVs in the same manner and haven't experienced burn in.

The reports of burn in on 2018 models, which have been around for 2 years, is practically zero.

I know that there have been engineering improvements but I don't believe this is the main factor that has all but eliminated the risk of burn in. The fact that loads of OLED owners used their 2017 and older TVs in the same manner and only a few of them experienced burn in suggests that the problem was the quality of the manufacturing process rather than OLED technology. I believe LG has improved the quality of their manufacturing process and this is why you never hear of 2018 and newer OLED TV models with burn in problems.
 
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lex1970

Novice Member
You didn't mention what you was planning to do with your LG 55C9 I wouldn't personally recommend using it as a PC monitor, you certainly don't want static images on the screen for hours on end. However I bought an ex demonstration LG 55C9 and since purchasing it, I've been watching, movies, Netflix and utube for up to 17 hours a day and have never experienced screen burn or image retention yet.
 

kenshingintoki

Distinguished Member
There is an inherent risk due to the nature of the technology. It's something you need to accept, given the immense PQ gains you get using an OLED.

If you can't, get an LCD.
 

Unopinionated

Active Member
There is an inherent risk due to the nature of the technology. It's something you need to accept, given the immense PQ gains you get using an OLED.

If you can't, get an LCD.
I think using the word inherent may overstate the message your trying to convey.

Inherent is the word rtings.com used to use for their stance when they gave OLED Burn In a 1.0 out of 10 rating.

rtings.com outdated stance, “OLED TVs such as the LG OLED E9 have an inherent risk of experiencing permanent image retention.” 1.0 OLED Burn In rating.

Merriam-Webster "Inherent literally refers to something that is "stuck in" something else so firmly that they can't be separated. A plan may have an inherent flaw that will cause it to fail; a person may have inherent virtues that everyone admires. Since the flaw and the virtues can't be removed, the plan may simply have to be thrown out and the person will remain virtuous forever."

rtings.com has since upgraded their OLED Burn In rating to a 2.0 and changed their stance to, "Although we don't expect most people who watch varied content to have any issues, OLED TVs, such as the LG OLED C9 do have the possibility of experiencing burn in."

I think using the word inherent may overstate the message your trying to convey.
 
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tele1962

Distinguished Member
If you fear burn in do not buy an OLED TV. Life is to short to be anxious and have to babysit your TV.

The professional TV Reviewers opinions can't be trusted. They are in on a big conspiracy with LG to minimize the OLED Burn In issue. Professional TV reviewers have to suck up to LG in order to get special recognition at CES. What a bunch of dishonest professional reviewers

Curry's and all of the other stores that sell TVs are in on a big conspiracy. They know that a huge number of their TVs are returned for OLED Burn In and they don't report it to the general public. What a bunch of dishonest store owners.

Youtube is full of people claiming to be experts and misleading people.

From Rtings.com*
Although we don't expect most people who watch varied content to have any issues, OLED TVs, such as the LG OLED C9 do have the possibility of experiencing burn in.

Vincent Teoh
OLED Burn In Risk is Overblown

Consumer Reports
Their statistical data shows that OLED Burn In is such a rare occurence that they don't even mention it as anything to be concerned with except for some 2015 OLED TVs.
Data on 97,554 TVs owned by Consumer Reports members who purchased a new set between 2010 and 2018 has been collected. Many of these TVs are OLEDs. If Burn In was a common problem I am sure Consumer Reports would mention it.

Geoffrey Morrison and David Katzmaier of CNET
If you vary your TV viewing habits like most people, however, it won't be an issue. Even so, caveat emptor. Or as Caesar once said, "Conscientiam autem ardeat sed non anxius" (be aware of burn-in, but not concerned).

John Archer of Forbes
Occurrences of permanent screen burn in the real consumer world are now and will continue to be rare.

Atomicus of Chichester
One thing that seems abundantly apparent is that while by no means should it be suggested that burn-in doesn't exist, the problem is nowhere near as widespread or as much a certainty as some people fear and/or lead others to believe.

Useful facts from dodgexander:
  • The risk of burn in with OLEDs is actually less than it was in the Plasma days. It's no more likely to happen now than then.
  • Its not only OLEDs that can suffer from burn in, abuse any type of display (even LCD) and you can get burn in. Just take a look at some of the old LCDs in pubs.
  • Youtube is full of people claiming to be experts and misleading people, do not believe everything you watch on Youtube. I don't want to name and shame but there are some really laughable content creators out there who literally will say anything to make a few extra views. Do not believe their rubbish! I am sure if you read this, you know the kind of channels I am talking about.
What utter rubbish. I have seen some stupid posts in my time regarding this subject but this one beats them all.:facepalm:
 

kenshingintoki

Distinguished Member
What utter rubbish. I have seen some stupid posts in my time regarding this subject but this one beats them all.:facepalm:

Did you not see the post above yours? (post number 7)

:rotfl:
 

sussertown

Standard Member
There are people who have experienced burn in with 2017 and older OLED models.

There are many people who have used there 2017 and older OLED TVs in the same manner and haven't experienced burn in.

The reports of burn in on 2018 models, which have been around for 2 years, is practically zero.

I know that there have been engineering improvements but I don't believe this is the main factor that has all but eliminated the risk of burn in. The fact that loads of OLED owners used their 2017 and older TVs in the same manner and only a few of them experienced burn in suggests that the problem was the quality of the manufacturing process rather than OLED technology. I believe LG has improved the quality of their manufacturing process and this is why you never hear of 2018 and newer OLED TV models with burn in problems.
My OLED is a 2018 model with burn in.
 

SunWorship

Standard Member
It amazes me that some are so vociferous in denying that burn-in is a significant problem with OLED.

The RTINGS test where they ran the 2017 models for 20 hours per day with various content is absolutely damning if you look closely at the data they collected, while keeping in mind that LG have said that it’s total cumulative time that matters, not session length.


Scroll down to “Uniformity Photos” and select Week 8. Yes if you look very closely there is burn-in on the FIFA tv (magenta slide) after 8 weeks of 20hrs a day. According to LG‘s reasoning that’s equivalent to a mere 32 weeks of 5hrs/day Of exposure.

Then there’s the CNN feed which - due to the bright red graphics - plays on the special weakness of the pre-2018 tv’s, the red sub-pixel. Burn-in on this tv had appeared as early as week 2.

Word is that LG increased the size of the red sub-pixel from the 2018 models onward, so they should be less vulnerable to burn-in on red and related hues. Again, looking closely at the uniformity photos one can see that magenta and red merely lead the way in burn-in with other colours following suit so such a pixel size increase would not be a panacea.

When it comes to 2018 and newer models: people are reporting burn-in on this forum and elsewhere, showing burn-in on YouTube etc and no OLED tv manufacturer has provided evidence that these TV’s do not suffer from burn-in.

Given the exhaustive evidence provided by the RTINGS test and the absence of evidence to the contrary, it seems to me to be very disrespectful to doubt those who claim that their TV has burn-in or who are concerned enough to avoid OLED or pay for insurance.
 

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