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Scart switcher to deinterlacer?

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by Mark_a, Jun 29, 2005.

  1. Mark_a

    Mark_a
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    Does anyone have experience with feeding say a Joytech scart switcher and taking its output to something like a Cinemateq Picture Optimizer?

    The Cinemateq only has one RGB scart input and I've got two sat boxes (one of them a Sky+), two games consoles, two DVD players (one a recorder), and a Freeview box, all with RGB output (not to mention two VCRs), so they've got to go through some sort of switching before they get to the Cinemateq (or whatever de-interlacer I get). I know DVDO and Lumagen models do more complex switching and processing, but they've both got connections that would be more hassle to connect that little lot up to, and they cost a lot more. I did read that the Joytech may not control stray voltages all that well, which is a bit of a concern.

    The other problem is at the other end. I want to feed both a Tosh 52" DLP RPTV and a Sanyo Z3 projector, so I need some sort of switch that will take the VGA output and split it between the two. It's a pity the Cinemateq doesn't give out component as I've just bought a Component Buffer from JS Tech which would have done the job perfectly. But I bought that before I thought about getting a de-interlacer.

    All I really want is to de-interlace the normal RGB feeds as that seems to get rid of the Tosh's motion blur quite effectively. I know this from feeding a Panasonic S97 progressive component into the Tosh where it gives tremendous picture quality with none of the blurring that the interlaced feeds give on occasion.

    Anyone any advice for any of the above?

    Cheers.

    Regards

    Mark
     
  2. philipb

    philipb
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    The Cinemateq has 2 SCART inputs which can both handle RGB. It also outputs component. Which model of Cinemateq do you have in mind? I have the SDI plus II. This has 2 SDI inputs; 2 SCARTs; 2 component (RCA and BNC); 2 s-video. it outputs DVI; VGA; Component.

    You can get the version which replaces the SDI with composite inputs - otherwise the same.

    I love my Cinemateq - works great. I've been following the spat between the Lumagen and DVDO camps on the other thread with much amusement.

    Come back if you need anything more on the Cinemateq.
     
  3. Mark_a

    Mark_a
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    Well, the thing with even the most expensive Cinemateq (and all the others, for that matter) is they don't have ENOUGH inputs. So whatever you do you have to switch before hand. Now it seems to me that if you're going to have to switch devices anyway, no matter what, why buy the expensive one and STILL have to switch some things? You might as well get yourself the cheap Cinemateq, with it's minimal inputs, and do all the switching with a good switcher before it. A lot cheaper, and as I said elsewhere, is there really any need to want to try and 'improve' a HiDef digital feed? If not, why get one with digital ins and outs when you can feed the TV/Projector directly with them and get results on the limit of what the display can do in the first place?

    Regards

    Mark
     
  4. Joe Fernand

    Joe Fernand
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    Mark a

    Lots of points to cover in your post :)

    RGB SCART switcher - the 'cost effective' switcher that's consistently proved it does a decent job is the B-Tech Quintro +; combined with the In/Out configuration of your SKY+ and Freeview that should give you enough SCART Input sockets.

    Video Processor - taking the SCART RGB Output from a SCART Switcher into a Lumagen or DVDO is no more or less hassle than into the Cinemateq; it simply requires a SCART to 4RCA cable rather than a SCART to SCART cable.

    Video Processor Programmable Output - keep in mind the Lumagen VisionDVI offers you the ability to set up multiple custom Output resolutions; you could have a 50 and 60Hz output optimised for the DLP TV + a 50 and 60Hz output Optimised for the LCD Projector.

    Video Processor Multiple Output sockets - I'm pretty sure that all of the Cinemateq products offer YUV Out (via the HD15 (VGA) socket or 3BNC); all you require with the entry level model is an HD15 (VGA) to 3RCA cable into your JS Technology 1:2 YUV Distribution amp.

    Video Processor 'Going Up Market' - along with better connectivity you'll find most manufacturers with multiple product lines will have enhanced processing as you step up through the product range.

    Video Processor 'Digital Sources' - agreed that HD is a 'better' looking source to begin with but try and find a way to adjust your Grey scale at 11 points in your Display or try and adjust out any overscan your Display applies to both Analogue and Digital signals; that's the type of control and flexibility products like Lumagen offer over the lower cost 'non programmable' units.

    As above I'm pretty sure the Cinemateq does offer you YUV Out - even the entry level model.

    Best regards

    Joe
     
  5. Mark_a

    Mark_a
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    Just realised you'd replied to this, Joe, cheers for the input.

    I'm still very undecided about all the possibilities and permutations. I do know that if the Cinemateq was nearer £400 than £600 then that would be my first choice. But as the Lumagen is now only £99 more it makes it seem somewhat overpriced for what you get by comparison. And the Lumagen's adjustable non-linear stretch mode seems a facility I'd quite like. Then there's the problem of lip sync. On digital that's not a problem as you can get delay units, but what about analogue feeds such as from a GameCube or PS2?

    And the thing that kicked all this off is a desire to get rid of the motion blur on my Tosh while watching Sky. I know de-interlacing seems to do the trick, as my Pany S97 demonstrates, but the TV itself has to have a de-interlacer so why doesn't the onboard one get rid of the motion blur? Surely a £2000 TV should have a better de-interlacer/scaler, or at least comparable, to a £160 DVD player's, yet it doesn't seem to be so. Hence the desire to see a Sky box fed through an external processor to see if it makes the picture as near as damn it to a decent DVD picture. I guess the best thing to do is try and get a demo of one feeding Sky to a Toshiba DLP RPTV and see with my own eyes what it can do.

    I hope all of that made sense.

    Regards

    Mark
     
  6. Joe Fernand

    Joe Fernand
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    Hello Mark

    Like other Lumagen dealers we offer an on-site demo - its a chargeable demo (though the cost is redeemed if you purchase a processor); often the only/best way to work out if the proposed solution will work for you.

    Possibly your TV simply runs out of processing power when its deinterlacing on top of everything else.

    You may also find your DLP TV actually 'refreshes' different Input signals at different rates - a lot of systems do Frame Rate Conversion to a frequency that 'fits best' with the on-board processing; you may find your watching your 576i 50Hz RGB signal back at anything from 70Hz to 75Hz; they don't often mention this in the spec or manuals of most kit.

    If you have an Analogue Audio source and a Digital Only delay such as the Felston DD540 its easy and pretty cost effective to add a sub £30.00 A/D converter to the Analogue source.

    Best regards

    Joe
     
  7. Mark_a

    Mark_a
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    Ah, but you live in Edinburgh and I live in Richmond, Surrey. Something of a long journey just to show off a bit if kit, I would have thought.

    Regards

    Mark
     
  8. Joe Fernand

    Joe Fernand
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    Hello Mark

    We cover the whole of the UK and Ireland so no worries about scheduling a visit to Richmond; we can work you into our schedules rather than a special trip (which as you guess would not be economical).

    Best regards

    Joe
     

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