1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Scart is better to VGA or to Component?

Discussion in 'Cables & Switches' started by dancingmatt, Jul 23, 2005.

  1. dancingmatt

    dancingmatt
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2005
    Messages:
    433
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +13
    Hi all

    Trying to figure out what cables I need to make the most of my new Sanyo Z3!! :clap:

    Going to connect my PC with a DVI-HDMI cable, but what about the stand-alone DVD player: it's only got Scart (and composite). Should I connect it to the Z3's VGA or Component input?

    I don't know which is best and which is worse between Scart, VGA and Component so if you can fill me in with an explanation that'd be great too.

    On the same note, the Freeview box only has Scart too but I guess that requires less bandwidth than a DVD player? Which should I connect that to?

    I dunno, years of getting into building PCs and I'm getting a bit confused about source resolutions and a little video cable... :suicide:

    Help please! I'm watching DVDs via composite on an 80" screen... have sympathy!

    Ta
    DM
     
  2. MarkE19

    MarkE19
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2002
    Messages:
    17,107
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Rainham Essex
    Ratings:
    +2,380
    What signals can your PJ accept via VGA?
    Scart can not in 99% of cases carry a component signal. It normally only carries composite, S-Video & RGBcvS. RGBcvS requires 4 connections, therefore a component input can not accept it. So it looks like you will need to use the VGA input or get another DVD player with component output. A DVD with component output will most likely offer a progressive scan signal for the best possible PQ, which you wont get via scart RGBcvS.
    My plasma can accept YUV component and RGB (all versions) via its VGA input, but this is not the case for all displays. If your PJ can be setup the same, then with a component DVD player to component and Freeview to VGA input set to RGBcvS you will get the best possible PQ (unless you get a video scaler :devil: ) possible.

    Mark.
     
  3. dancingmatt

    dancingmatt
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2005
    Messages:
    433
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +13
    Hi Mark

    Thanks for your reply.

    So I can't get a Scart-3 plug component cable because Scart requires 4 connections? I haven't heard that before. Now you've really confused me!

    And using VGA isn't overkill for a Scart socket? I had presumed that VGA was much better than Scart, so would be overkill, but you think that's the best way to go? And it will work attached to a stand-alone DVD player?

    Thanks again Mark, and anyone else who can help

    DM
     
  4. philipb

    philipb
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2002
    Messages:
    1,980
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Swindon
    Ratings:
    +129
    Yes you can get a scart to 3 phono connection but it will only work if the scart on your DVd player can output a YPbPr component signal - and it probably cannot. As Mark says such things are thin on the ground.

    I hesitate to suggest buying an updated DVD player with component out :rolleyes: . The other option would be to buy a SCART to VGA converter box - Keene, Elektropack or JS Tech - which will do the job for you. That will turn a standard RGB SCART signal into a VGA signal which almost certainly will be compatible with your display.
     
  5. Reiner

    Reiner
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2000
    Messages:
    3,315
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    61
    Location:
    Germany
    Ratings:
    +13
    As Mark pointed out Scart can carry different types of video signals (composite, S-Video and RGB) but it purely depends on the make and model which are available to you.

    When using RGB over Scart the sync (synchronization signal) is carried via the composite video signal (cv), so that's why Mark called it RGBcvS and hence it requires 4 connections. Some projectors may accept this signal via the VGA input, see your projector's user manual.

    RGB is a component signal (from a technical point of view) but RGB is not the same nor compatible with Component aka YUV (the red, blue and green RCA connectors that you may find at the back of newer DVD players and some TVs/projectors etc.).

    Scart may sometimes carry Component/YUV, but it's not a standard solution (more proprietary, see e.g. Loewe TVs.) and most likely not applicable to the equipment you are using.

    VGA is also RGB, but it's RGBHV (RGB + horizontal and vertical sync), thus not directly compatible with RGB(cvS) over Scart.

    VGA isn't carried over Scart, so it would only work if the DVD player has a VGA ouput or with some converter inbetween as philipb suggested.
    Since VGA can also be progressive it is actually better than RGB via Scart.

    And to add a bit confusion: sometimes the VGA input can be used for Component/YUV - but only if the manufacturer has decided so.
    From what I gathered this is not the case with your projector that already has two dedicated Component/YUV inputs; since your DVD player doesn't have such an output anyhow let's just forget about it. ;)


    So as it seems you have several problems: no matching connections / video signals between DVD and projector and lack of another input for the freeview box.

    If you want to keep things simple you can however connect
    - DVD to projector using a Scart to S-Video adapter cable if the player can output S-Video via Scart (check DVD player's manual)
    - Freeview box to projector via composite

    Another option is to get either a new DVD player or an AV amp/receiver with video switching and video up-conversion.


    If you have further questions please specify make and model of the DVD player or what video signals are available (via Scart or other connections).
    As well it would help if you check what kind of signals your projector can accept and via which inputs.
     
  6. MyBoxLife

    MyBoxLife
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2005
    Messages:
    2,524
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    86
    Location:
    Birmingham
    Ratings:
    +109
    Sorry to hijack your Thread dancingmatt, but have similar concerns!

    My DVD Player, Sony DVP-NS700V, also, only has Scart or Composite, do I use a Scart to S-Video Cable to connect it to a Pioneer VSX-XA5Ai-S, or does it need to go through something like a J.S. Technology converter box?
     
  7. Joe Fernand

    Joe Fernand
    Distinguished Member AVForums Sponsor

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2002
    Messages:
    23,802
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    The Borders
    Ratings:
    +2,469
    Hello all

    I think we need a new rule about not mixing up Connectivity Standards with Video signals :)

    SCART is a connectivity standard not a video signal - as Reiner points out a SCART connector can transmit/receive Composite, S-Video, YUV and RGB signals; though the hardware manufacturer can choose to only enable one, some or all of these signals on any Source or Display device.

    VGA describes a PC video signal (640x480).

    An HD15 D-Type (VGA) connector can transmit/receive a range of signal formats; including RGB Video, YUV video and RGBHV PC signals. Again the hardware manufacturer can choose to implement one, some or all of these signals on any Source or Display device.

    dancingmatt - usually where a Projector has the ability to Input an RGB+Composite sync signal from a SCART equipped source into its HD15 (VGA) socket the Projector manufacturer will provide a SCART to HD15(VGA) adapter.

    If this is not the case with your projector then connect the SCART output of your DVD player to the SCART Input of your Freeview box and then the SCART Output of the Freeview box to an RGB2YUV converter and connect the YUV Output of the Converter to the YUV 'Component' Input on your projector - you have to ensure that both your DVD player and Freeview have RGB enabled in the user set up menu's.

    MyBoxLife - what Display are you using?

    Best regards

    Joe
     
  8. MyBoxLife

    MyBoxLife
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2005
    Messages:
    2,524
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    86
    Location:
    Birmingham
    Ratings:
    +109
    From the Amp. to a Epson TW10H via 10m Profigold Component Cable.
     
  9. dancingmatt

    dancingmatt
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2005
    Messages:
    433
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +13
    Hi everyone

    Mark, philipb, Reiner and Joe - thanks for all your posts. I've used a few forums in the past but this one is full of so many really helpful people! I was trying to understand where Scart came in quality compared to component, composite etc but now I get it - Scart is a connector, VGA is a signal (I knew the VGA bit anyway).

    I'll dig out the manual for the DVD player (it's my girlfriends) and see what it says about the Scart. In the meantime...

    I read this on audioholics.com:

    So if I buy a 5-connector snake I can see how I could just use the 3 R, G and B leads for a component-component connection (great for when I get a source with one, as I said the DVD and Freeview don't) but somehow I could use the other 2 H and V leads for S-video? How? Is there a simple passive adaptor that I could buy for each end?

    And in a similar vein, could I instead use just one of the snake, either the H or V lead, for composite? In essence is the snake just 5 equivalent-to-composite cables and could be used individually? For that matter, are the 3 leads in a RGB component cable just the same as 3 composite cables put together?

    I'm liking the idea of buying the 5 lead snake and using it for multiple purposes, all going into my Sanyo Z3 projector but coming from 3 different sources... surely it would be cheaper to buy one RGBHV snake than composite, s-video and RGB component cables?

    Can anyone figure this out?

    Thanks
    DM
     
  10. Joe Fernand

    Joe Fernand
    Distinguished Member AVForums Sponsor

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2002
    Messages:
    23,802
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    The Borders
    Ratings:
    +2,469
    Hello dancingmatt

    The tip re using a five core video Multicore is very valid - though its worth noting that two x S-Video to 2RCA(Female) or 2BNC(Female) adapter cables can be quite expensive; often more expensive than a dedicated S-Video cable.

    Many YUV 'Component' Multicore cables (3RCA to 3RCA or 3BNC) are in fact five core Multicore cables and the manufacture simply ignores two of the cores - this is not true of all cables mind!

    A five core Multicore video cable is 5 x 75ohm conductors bundled in a single outer so yes you can pass Composite, S-Video, YUV or RGB over the cable using one or more of the five conductors (you could have YUV + 2 x Composite or YUV + S-Video on one five core cable).

    Best regards

    Joe
     
  11. Joe Fernand

    Joe Fernand
    Distinguished Member AVForums Sponsor

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2002
    Messages:
    23,802
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    The Borders
    Ratings:
    +2,469
    Hello MyBoxLife

    I'd set the DVD player to Output RGB and then use a JS Technology RGB2YUV converter between the Player and the YUV Input on your AV Receiver.

    You'll retain a decent image and gain the simplicity of switching multiple 'same type' signals on the AV Receiver.

    Best regards

    Joe
     
  12. MyBoxLife

    MyBoxLife
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2005
    Messages:
    2,524
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    86
    Location:
    Birmingham
    Ratings:
    +109
    Thanks Joe Fernand, not a cheap option though.
     
  13. Joe Fernand

    Joe Fernand
    Distinguished Member AVForums Sponsor

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2002
    Messages:
    23,802
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    The Borders
    Ratings:
    +2,469
    Hello MyBoxLife

    As others have suggested unless your very attached to your Sony DVD player you may want to consider purchasing a Player with YUV 'Component' Outputs - it'll still cost a fair few quid but possibly a better long term strategy if your Sony player is a few years old.

    Best regards

    Joe
     

Share This Page

Loading...