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Scan Output Type

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by timothywood, Mar 10, 2003.

  1. timothywood

    timothywood
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    I have a HK DVD25 and was just playing around last night with the "info" button. This shows information on the discs being played - format, bit rate etc. One field is the Output Scan Type.
    This sometimes changes during the start up display, menu and actual movie. It changes between progressive and interlaced.
    Most of the earlier DVD's I have (all R2) seem to be interlaced with occasionally the menu changing to progessive. Later films seem to have progressive scan output. For those earlier films am I to assume that despite have prog scan enabled on the DVD player (both NTSC & PAL) the data on the disc can only be extracted as an interlaced signal ?
     
  2. RichardA

    RichardA
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    Timothy,

    Your display is showing what is 'flagged' on the DVD - There is information on there to tell the player what the format of the disk is so that it can be processed 'correctly'.

    The problem is that the flags and the content do not necessarily tie up - which can be a problem for de-interlacers that rely on the flags to set whether they treat the material as Video or Film (i.e. Interlace or Progressive respectively) - this generally includes PC DVD players.

    Off-board de-interlacers and most of those in stand-alone DVD players ignore the flags and make de-interlacing decisions based on analysis of the picture content - It may be surprising that this is more accurate than following the DVD manufacturers settings, but that tends to be the case!

    So, at the end of the day, your DVD player's display is really only of academic interest (and like most of the bitrate displays is generally inaccurate)

    Hope this helps,

    Richard. (Now in New York and still jet-lagged)
     

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