Satellite internet connections pro and cons.

ron swanson

Active Member
Just an update for anyone who is interested.

I got quoted £40'000 to £50'000 to get the work done, I had to ask for a breakdown of the costs because not half a mile up the road there are people with full fiber connections.

It's beginning to look a lot like an alternate will be required.
 

psychopomp1

Member
That's a bummer. But at least you now know why you were left out of the Openreach commercial FTTP rollout in the first place: extremely high costs. In all likelihood, the existing FTTP infrastructure being used for other homes won't be used for your home hence the high cost.

Moving forward, if you can club together with at least 20 neighbours who've also been left out of the FTTP rollout, then a Openreach CFP might be your best option. Openreach might quote you 'only' £60,000 for say 20 properties. So say @ £3,000 each, this is hell of a lot more palatable than £40,000 for just one.

 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
I got quoted £40'000 to £50'000 to get the work done, I had to ask for a breakdown of the costs

That's a good move, Openreach have been providing some improbable USO/FTTPoD desktop quotes - Ofcom are investigating.
 

ron swanson

Active Member
That's a good move, Openreach have been providing some improbable USO/FTTPoD desktop quotes - Ofcom are investigating.

I knew I'd seen that story with ofcom somewhere and it was the reason I wanted a breakdown of costs. I figured I'd have to pay a little bit but when as I said houses half a mile up the road have access to full fiber it seemed a bit extortionate.
 

ron swanson

Active Member
That's a bummer. But at least you now know why you were left out of the Openreach commercial FTTP rollout in the first place: extremely high costs. In all likelihood, the existing FTTP infrastructure being used for other homes won't be used for your home hence the high cost.

Moving forward, if you can club together with at least 20 neighbours who've also been left out of the FTTP rollout, then a Openreach CFP might be your best option. Openreach might quote you 'only' £60,000 for say 20 properties. So say @ £3,000 each, this is hell of a lot more palatable than £40,000 for just one.


Of my 20 neighbours as far as I can tell 12 of them have access to full fiber theres only a few of us left out.
 

Vectis42

Novice Member
I'm just looking for some advice regarding satellite internet.

I currently on average get 3.5meg sometimes I can get 5 but the slow downloads for patches etc on the playstation is not something I can live with anymore now I know we are no longer currently being considered for any sort of fiber connection.

I've looked into satellite internet connections and I was wondering if anyone has any experience of using them? I have a few reservations over latency and wondered if it would cause any issues when streaming on netflix or amazon?

I ran a satellite ISP for 15+ years. I have experience with both Eutelsat (Tooway, DStar) and Astra2Connect. If you are getting 3.5 Mbps on average, then satellilte is not for you. Yes it will deliver the headline speeds but not all the time. It's very bursty and depends a lot on how many others are sharing the same channel. Geo-stationary satelliltes tend to use muxes (like digital TV) so e.g. if you are using a 27 MHz transponder, they might be squeezing 35 Mbps onto it. If you are the only user at the time, yes, you'd get 30 Mbps (untill your data allowance throtttles you). But if there are 2 users downloading at the same time, that's a max of 17.5 Mbps each, 3 users 11.6 and so on. (I'm a few years out of the industry so they might be using different parameters by now.)

Latency is also very high - round trip is 23k miles x 4 so 92,000 miles which is 0.5 sec at speed of light and ye canna change the laws of physics. That's before any system / internet overhead on top.

We had a rule of thumb which is if you had a reliable ADSL connection of 1 MBps, you'd probably experience satellite as slow (it wouldn't be but the latency makes it feel slow) so unless there's an over-riding reaon, don't.

I'm not sure the newer LEO constellations are in full operation or cost effective. Certainly maritime-style services were very expensive.

If you have an independent network in your area - or close - why not ask them? They might have plans for your area. Most of them build in areas not covered by Openreach. Start with the INCA site, then Think Broadband. HTH.
 

groovyclam

Active Member
I'd suggest trying out broadband via mobile phone mast again.

From my experience:

Get a cheap pay-as-you-go sim for all four providers and put them in your phone and do a speedtest.net. One of them may give you the speed you need. Try it outside your house at all four sides of the house. Hang out of upstairs windows and try as well.

For my area O2 were very poor, 3 better ( but their service is capped at 30Mb/s download and 3 Mb/s upload I think ), Vodafone better still and EE the best. However between Vodafone and EE only Vodafone do an unlimited download mobile broadband package ( about £35 per month ), EE only sells download tiered packages and the 300G per month I would need costs £45 per month so I went with the slower but cheaper Vodafone. If you are OK with the speeds from 3 then they are currently the cheapest unlimited monthly contract download supplier ( I think £26 per month ).

If you do find a provider that gives you a good speed and ping then they will send you their own SIM-locked router as part of the package BUT there is a real problem with positioning the router in your house so it gets the best mobile phone mast signal versus where you actually need the router to be. I suggest buying a much better third party all-SIM unlocked router yourself:

Teltonika 4G-RUT240 Compact Industrial 4G LTE Router

Note the tray that takes the SIM in that router requires the ***biggest SIM shape*** so save any excess SIM plastic if you pop out the SIM to make it a mini or micro size so you can convert it back to a maxi size.

I also suggest using an external aerial with it, attached to the top of your house for maximum signal to boost the small screw-on aerial on the router:

Poynting 4G-XPOL-A0001 Cross Polarised 4G Omni LTE Antenna

That way you can place the router wherever you want to in the house as long as you can run the external aerial lead to it. That aerial can actually stick to the outside of a window with supplied suction cups if you don't mind that rather than screwing it to an external wall.

With that equipment and the Vodafone £35 per month mobile broadband SIM, I went from 15 Mb/s down 1 Mb/s up on FTTC to 40 Mb/s down and 30 Mb/s up with a ping of about 32 ms. This meant I could finally watch 4K streams on Amazon and my cloud backups didn't take an epoch to finish.

Shop around for the best prices for the router and aerial.

That router can create it's own WiFi network for the house and you can plug it into an ethernet network to serve that if you want to.
 
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