Satellite cable RG6 junction (not splitter)

madeinstein

Standard Member
Hi,

I have 2 satellite cables coming from outside (sky hd) and I want to connect them to 2 satellite sockets (2 outputs) in my reception room (one on each side of the chimney breast). Only one will be used at a time so the other one will be there just in case if we want to move TV to the other side.

How to do a junction? I don't want to use splitters as the signal goes down and it's not necessary here. I couldn't find anything on the market. The only think I came up with is this (see picture) but I was hoping to get a junction box.

rswggz.jpg

Thanks
 

inzaman

Moderator
Moved
 
D

Deleted member 30535

Guest
If only one pair are used at a time, then yes, I see no reason why you cannot just connect them as you outline. Not sure of the best method to do this, but in theory it should work.
 

Alan Mac

Well-known Member
Hi,

I have 2 satellite cables coming from outside (sky hd) and I want to connect them to 2 satellite sockets (2 outputs) in my reception room (one on each side of the chimney breast). Only one will be used at a time so the other one will be there just in case if we want to move TV to the other side.

How to do a junction? I don't want to use splitters as the signal goes down and it's not necessary here. I couldn't find anything on the market. The only think I came up with is this (see picture) but I was hoping to get a junction box.

image

Thanks

No, you can’t simply connect two cables directly to the same outlet. Not if you want the system to work correctly.

The arrangement shown on your drawing will produce a “comb filter” effect in the frequency response of the feed to the receiver nearest to the antenna.

To avoid this, you will need two hybrid splitters with DC pass from input to both output ports. You can get these from Amazon and other suppliers.

The minimum theoretical loss for a hybrid splitter is 3.01 dB. However, there will in practice be something approaching 6 dB loss between input and output ports. There should ideally be at least 20 dB loss between the two output ports, when the input port is terminated in 75 Ω.

The 6 dB loss is unlikely to have a significant effect on the signal to noise ratio at the receiver, because there is a high gain amplifier in the LNBF at the antenna.



Alan
 
D

Deleted member 30535

Guest
Well, I learn something every day!

@ OP. Where do the cables come into the house and how to they get to the first outlet?

Could you get a Quad LNB and run 4 cables, two to each socket?

Or, if you're not going to be moving that often, think about where you could just re-patch or re-route the two incoming cables from one plate to the other. A simple F-type barrel connector would do the trick.

screenshot2011121100032.png


screenshot2011121100123.jpg
 
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