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Samsung Q950TS QLED 8K TV Review

Steve Withers

Reviewer
I think on balance, most of my content is DV so the CX 77 or C9 77 (if a stellar deals come up) is perhaps the front runner.
If you ask Samsung it will say its high-end TVs don't need Dolby Vision because they're already so good with HDR. While that might be true, with Netflix, Apple and Disney all using Dolby Vision, the lack of support will hurt its products when it comes to consumers wanting a comprehensive feature set. I have told Samsung this on multiple occasions.
 

Steve Withers

Reviewer
What is the best native ratio you mesured on lcd tv till now if you remember?
And i m curious if tv is handeling any better that Netflix strange aspect ratio black bars in compare to q90r?
I understand that Samsung put max efort in standard aspect black bars but would be nice that they take care about that Netflix aspect ratio.
I honestly can't remember, for the last few years it's mainly been OLEDs or Samsung TVs where you couldn't turn the local dimming off, which made it impossible to test the native contrast ratio.

I guess the blackness of black bars largely depends on where the LEDs are actually located.
 

Dog299

Active Member
If you ask Samsung it will say its high-end TVs don't need Dolby Vision because they're already so good with HDR. While that might be true, with Netflix, Apple and Disney all using Dolby Vision, the lack of support will hurt its products when it comes to consumers wanting a comprehensive feature set. I have told Samsung this on multiple occasions.

I totally agree with you.

I would imagine that the high end TVs consumers are more aware of these features and therefore notice when they are not present.

Outside of which is better, DV certainly has the jump in terms of awareness.

When paying £5k+ i want to feel i am having the premium experience (if only perceived) from streaming Apps.

Having paid £13.99 for a 4K DV Atmos movie on Apple, i want to know i have the 'best' version for my TV (noting that the ultimate answer is probably the physical copy).
 

tomhd

Active Member
Hi
Sorry for a stupid question but if I get this tv and watch something on Apple TV/Netflix which is in Dolby Vision what will I see, HDR ? Are all those movies in both formats? I’m on C6 oled now ( slightly burn in😡) and looking for something bigger better burn in free...
Also, can’t see in a review what was contrast like?
Cheers guys and stay and home
 

MEGATAMA

Active Member
If you ask Samsung it will say its high-end TVs don't need Dolby Vision because they're already so good with HDR. While that might be true, with Netflix, Apple and Disney all using Dolby Vision, the lack of support will hurt its products when it comes to consumers wanting a comprehensive feature set. I have told Samsung this on multiple occasions.
They are saying about no need to do ton maping till 1000nits?
What is your opinion about this?
If i understand corectly....if TV can do 1000+ nits picture till 1000nits is represented in "native" brightness range?Its hard to explain on english.....
I didnt see article about this topic on tv portals....or i missed it maybe....
 

MEGATAMA

Active Member
Hi
Sorry for a stupid question but if I get this tv and watch something on Apple TV/Netflix which is in Dolby Vision what will I see, HDR ? Are all those movies in both formats? I’m on C6 oled now ( slightly burn in😡) and looking for something bigger better burn in free...
Also, can’t see in a review what was contrast like?
Cheers guys and stay and home
Yes it will defolt to HDR10.
 

Steve Withers

Reviewer
They are saying about no need to do ton maping till 1000nits?
What is your opinion about this?
If i understand corectly....if TV can do 1000+ nits picture till 1000nits is represented in "native" brightness range?Its hard to explain on english.....
I didnt see article about this topic on tv portals....or i missed it maybe....
If a TV has a colour gamut that reaches 100% of DCI-P3, a peak brightness that extends up to 1,500 nits and 400 nits on a full field pattern then it shouldn't need to tone map content graded at 1,000 nits. Of course it will still need to tone map 4,000 nits content, of which there is quite a bit on disc.
 

MEGATAMA

Active Member
If a TV has a colour gamut that reaches 100% of DCI-P3, a peak brightness that extends up to 1,500 nits and 400 nits on a full field pattern then it shouldn't need to tone map content graded at 1,000 nits. Of course it will still need to tone map 4,000 nits content, of which there is quite a bit on disc.
I didnt know about colour gamut,did you maybe saw in live that Sony 1000nits koncept tv?
I was watching The Wall and that LG micro leds on IFA Berlin show and i dont know what was peak brightness on The Wall and was there any tone maping but demo content was out of this world.....sun glimering thru tree branches,i never saw something so realistic and alive in tv picture.
There was not long ago article about did oleds hit a wall with progress on this portal and i must say if oleds cant achive this kind of impact with high picture brightness in future they will have huge disandvatage in PQ quality.
 

Cyprio

Active Member
So the Q950ts does sound like it has the makings of being an excellent tv, and a worthy alternative to Oled if you are concerned about burn-in. Though here's my problem - DSE DSE DSE.
Last year I had the trouble of having to return three 75" Samsung tv's, one 900r and two 950r's, as all three had noticeable dse!

These are very expensive televisions so let's hope there has been some attention paid to addressing the dse issue. We shall see. :)

Thanks for the review @Steve Withers
 
Last edited:

Rockets

Active Member
So the Q950ts does sound like it has the makings of being an excellent tv, and a worthy alternative to Oled if you are concerned about burn-in. Though here's my problem - DSE DSE DSE.
Last year I had the trouble of having to return three 75" Samsung tv's, one 900r and two 950r's, as all three had noticeable dse!

These are very expensive televisions so let's hope there has been some attention paid to addressing the dse issue. We shall see. :)

Thanks for the review @Steve Withers
Reading the review it's clear it has been greatly enhanced over previous efforts.
 

Coulson

Well-known Member
If HDR is your most important criteria then I'd definitely recommend the Q950TS over an OLED
Thank you. Finally! This is why I prefer my LED. Of course it's not as good as this but it's still 1500nits with excellent local dimming so as good as OLED is, for HDR it's not even close. Although to be fair the Phillips HDR Perfect is pretty close.
 

hd3d

Member
Samaung Q950TS will be available from April 2020 UK
65-inch (QE65Q950TS – £5,999) ?
75-inch (QE75Q950TS – £7,999)
:laugh:
82-inch (QE82Q950TS – £11,999) :)
-----------------------------------------------------
LG OLED77CXPUA (USA)
77" *$4,999 :clap:
Available May 2020 (USA)
OLED65CXPUA (USA)
65" *$2,799 Available April 2020 (USA)
-----------------------------------------------------------
was thinking of buying the 75" Q950TS but due to the **** Price changed my mind
Hopefully in the near future when we "bounce back" from (COVID-19) will be looking at the LG CX 77" (4K v 8K) not a great deal of difference picture quality/content :thumbsdow
 

Kingchin

Active Member
The AI processing can't be turned off, but you need it because unless you're watching a native 8K source the Q950TS has to upscale the image to match the panel. It doesn't affect the filmmakers' intentions at all, and believe me it's incredibly effective. LG and Panasonic also use AI-enhanced processing (Alpha9 and HCX Pro), and Samsung will be adding a Filmmaker Mode to its 2020 TVs.
How can it not affect the filmmakers intentions at all when the review plainly say's the Samsung Q950TS uses - AI created formulas and filters applying noise reduction, edge restoration, texture creation and fine detail restoration.

Adding noise reduction and edge enhancement definitely isn't the directors intent for their movie's :smashin: the soon to be released Panasonic and LG tv's disable all the junk like noise reduction, edge enhancement for their Filmmaker modes. Samsung has no excuse for not letting you manually turn off noise reduction and edge enhancement.

So judging by the previous response you're saying the Samsung Q950TS keeps the noise reduction, edge enhancement in all the picture modes including the incoming filmmakers mode?

I would of thought a respected site like AVforums seeks a true to life natural image from a television. Over a artificial or effective image as you put it, but I guess unfortunately not. Ps sorry if I sound harsh I just prefer like many others a accurate picture as the director intended over a picture with noise reduction, edge enhancement added.
 
Last edited:
Samaung Q950TS will be available from April 2020 UK
65-inch (QE65Q950TS – £5,999) ?
75-inch (QE75Q950TS – £7,999)
:laugh:
82-inch (QE82Q950TS – £11,999) :)
-----------------------------------------------------
LG OLED77CXPUA (USA)
77" *$4,999 :clap:
Available May 2020 (USA)
OLED65CXPUA (USA)
65" *$2,799 Available April 2020 (USA)
-----------------------------------------------------------
was thinking of buying the 75" Q950TS but due to the **** Price changed my mind
Hopefully in the near future when we "bounce back" from (COVID-19) will be looking at the LG CX 77" (4K v 8K) not a great deal of difference picture quality/content :thumbsdow
I know the prices are high now for the new Samsung’s but at Xmas time they will be a lot cheaper eg last year I got the Samsung 65q950r for £2500 plus got a free mobile phone which I sold for £700 making it £1800 I paid in the end. I could’ve got the 75q950r for £2800 too with selling the mobile phone and the 82q950r can be had for £5500 on John Lewis now plus a free sound bar.
 

1234VICE

Member
I do not understand why the HDR performance is referred to as 'targeting accuracy', seemingly based on the PQTF tracking alone. However, it still uses scene-by-scene (undefeatable ?) dynamic tone mapping, which effectively can be used - and has been in the past - to brighten the picture. If this set can hit ~3500 nits, it should not have any dynamic tone mapping enabled if it is about accuracy and respecting the creators intend.

I wonder whether part of the impressive HDR experience of this set is due to simple trickery; brightening the image artificially via dynamic tone mapping.

All in all, it is good to hear that PQTF tracking is now accurate - whereas on the 2019 model contrast needed to be lowered a few clicks to achieve this - and shadow detail is more respected. Though, the latter is a rather qualitative assessment. It is not obvious to me from the review to what extend PQ has been improved concretely over 2019 models.
 

Spee2k

Well-known Member
I know the prices are high now for the new Samsung’s but at Xmas time they will be a lot cheaper eg last year I got the Samsung 65q950r for £2500 plus got a free mobile phone which I sold for £700 making it £1800 I paid in the end. I could’ve got the 75q950r for £2800 too with selling the mobile phone and the 82q950r can be had for £5500 on John Lewis now plus a free sound bar.
I would advise you never to buy a Samsung TV at launch! I learnt this the hard way with my 75Q90R. Grit your teeth, banish all those upgrade demons or call Dr Sleep to lock them in one of his coffins/boxes for at least 6 months and you could save yourself close to £2000! ;)
 

Steve Withers

Reviewer
How can it not affect the filmmakers intentions at all when the review plainly say's the Samsung Q950TS uses - AI created formulas and filters applying noise reduction, edge restoration, texture creation and fine detail restoration.

Adding noise reduction and edge enhancement definitely isn't the directors intent for their movie's :smashin: the soon to be released Panasonic and LG tv's disable all the junk like noise reduction, edge enhancement for their Filmmaker modes. Samsung has no excuse for not letting you manually turn off noise reduction and edge enhancement.

So judging by the previous response you're saying the Samsung Q950TS keeps the noise reduction, edge enhancement in all the picture modes including the incoming filmmakers mode?

I would of thought a respected site like AVforums seeks a true to life natural image from a television. Over a artificial or effective image as you put it, but I guess unfortunately not. Ps sorry if I sound harsh I just prefer like many others a accurate picture as the director intended over a picture with noise reduction, edge enhancement added.
If you're watching anything on an 8K TV that's not native 8K, the TV has to upscale the source to match the panel. The same goes if you're watching non-4K content on a 4K panel. As long as that upscaling isn't changing the look of the film, then I have no issue with it. Based upon my testing Samsung's AI-enhanced upscaling does an amazing job, without adversely affecting the image by applying noise reduction or edge enhancement. I agree with you, a TV should not be adding edges or using noise reduction to scrub film grain that's supposed to be there. As I mention in the review, the noise reduction is a separate control on the Q950TS.
 

Steve Withers

Reviewer
I do not understand why the HDR performance is referred to as 'targeting accuracy', seemingly based on the PQTF tracking alone. However, it still uses scene-by-scene (undefeatable ?) dynamic tone mapping, which effectively can be used - and has been in the past - to brighten the picture. If this set can hit ~3500 nits, it should not have any dynamic tone mapping enabled if it is about accuracy and respecting the creators intend.

I wonder whether part of the impressive HDR experience of this set is due to simple trickery; brightening the image artificially via dynamic tone mapping.

All in all, it is good to hear that PQTF tracking is now accurate - whereas on the 2019 model contrast needed to be lowered a few clicks to achieve this - and shadow detail is more respected. Though, the latter is a rather qualitative assessment. It is not obvious to me from the review to what extend PQ has been improved concretely over 2019 models.
If you select the Standard local dimming setting in HDR that applies dynamic tone mapping, but if you select the High setting that uses static tone mapping (unless the content includes HDR10+). I'll check I made that clear in the review.
 

1234VICE

Member
If you select the Standard local dimming setting in HDR that applies dynamic tone mapping, but if you select the High setting that uses static tone mapping (unless the content includes HDR10+). I'll check I made that clear in the review.
You are right; you mentioned this in the review. This is my bad, thank you for clarifying this.

Looks like Samsung is stepping its game up this year, and is establishing itself as a more 'serious' brand. By enabling an accurate picture mode, they are broadening their appeal to movie enthusiasts, rather than the more consumer oriented focus we have seen previous from Samsung. This is definitely to be applauded, since they produce the most impressive lcd hardware.

I only wish that they would produce a 55" model with similar specifications :).

Thank you again.
 

Spee2k

Well-known Member
Steve, honestly why are these companies pushing 8K so hard when 4K hasn't even gone anywhere near full market saturation? From what I have seen there is nothing on the horizon for 8K in physical media or from the main streaming services
I wouldn't go as far as calling 8K a gimmick, but is there any survey or study to support people like Samsung jumping both feet into 8K at the detriment of what is still a growing 4K niche?
 

MEGATAMA

Active Member
When is AI reconstructing of picture on this level i can see point of 8K panels,Nvidia is doing something similar with DLSS wich is in 2.0 version and picture is reconstructed even from 1080p to 4K and results are insane.
AI reconstructing of picture is future now.
I would like to see this tv in personal,curious about this bezeless design...on pictures looks really beutifule.
Btw i think 90% of movie content is upscaled or reconstructed/mastered from around 2K to 4K.....
 

Steve Withers

Reviewer
Steve, honestly why are these companies pushing 8K so hard when 4K hasn't even gone anywhere near full market saturation? From what I have seen there is nothing on the horizon for 8K in physical media or from the main streaming services
I wouldn't go as far as calling 8K a gimmick, but is there any survey or study to support people like Samsung jumping both feet into 8K at the detriment of what is still a growing 4K niche?
I've often questioned the logic of 8K in the past, but I have to say that the upscaling on the Q950TS was something of a revelation. I know it can't add detail that isn't there, but watching something like Blade Runner 2049 I was amazed because I was seeing things I'd never noticed before.

Having said that the push to 8K was supposed to tie-in with showcase events like the Olympics, so under the current circumstances I can't see there being much demand. In fact with the danger of a global depression, the demand for TVs might be seriously reduced, with consumers going for cheaper 4K models instead.
 

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