Quantcast

Samsung Q8DN (QE55Q8DN) Review & Comments

Coulson

Well-known Member
Thanks.

So does this TV suffer from the same brightness cheating as the Q9 highlighted by another reviewer (by not following the REC 709 curve thereby artificially brightening all TV sources). Also does it also suffer from the over aggressive local dimming which results in loss of detail in dark scenes (e.g. The Star field in Gravity actually showing less stars than on other TVs.)

Sorry for all the questions, I'm just curious :)
 

SunnyIntervals

Active Member
Quote from review:

"If you want absolutely contrast and blacks for movie watching in a dim viewing room, with the occasional gaming session, then OLED is the choice for that use case. If however you have a normal living room with bright lighting during the day and at night, you game for hours at a time and are concerned about possible image retention, then an LCD TV is more suited to your use case."

Where's the evidence that playing games on an OLED is somehow inferior or something you shouldn't do to often for fear of damaging the screen? I've had mine for over a year now and play games regularly, I've had no screen issues, lag issues, or frankly anything that supports this view that there is a problem with gaming and OLED. Is there evidence for this or is it just theoretical?
 

Goldorak

Distinguished Member
Thank you Phil,very good review and timely.
Will appreciate your help on these questions:
1. Oetf tracking corrected...great news!!!!. Is it via firmware update or simply by not selecting the motion enhancer feature?
2. Agressive dimming crushing blacks still there like q9? (Asked above)
3. How will you compare this tv via xf9. Ratings say it is brighter. Xf9 seems more accurate out of the box (OS biggest pitfall unless oreo improve things)
4. This tv is priced VERY BADLY versus q9 and xf9. Would you say it is a bargain for lcd if priced £500-£600 less than Q9fn?
5. Looks like Q8dn needs calibration big time to get best from it...seems like a must from the measurement ?
6. Do you know if q9 oetf tracking is also accurate now ?

Thank you in advance for your help in addressing above questions.
 
Last edited:

Coulson

Well-known Member
Thank you Phil,very good review and timely.
Will appreciate your help on these questions:
1. Oetf tracking corrected...great news!!!!. Is it via firmware update or simply by not selecting the motion enhancer feature?
2. Agressive dimming crushing blacks still there like q9?
3. How will you compare this tv via xf9. Ratings say it is brighter. Xf9 seems more accurate out of the box (OS biggest pitfall unless oreo improve things)
4. This tv is priced VERY BADLY versus q9 and xf9. Would you say it is a bargain for lcd if priced £500-£600 less than Q9fn?
5. Looks like Q8dn needs calibration big time to get best from it...seems like a must from the measurement ?

Thank you in advance for your help in addressing above questions.
Already asked the same questions.
 

Phil Hinton

Editor
Staff member
Thanks.

So does this TV suffer from the same brightness cheating as the Q9 highlighted by another reviewer (by not following the REC 709 curve thereby artificially brightening all TV sources).
No it follows things as they should be when set up correctly. You can see that in the graphs in the review and the text. I believe that the reviewer was highlighting HDR PQ curve variance, (not Rec709). It is bang on here with the Q8DN.

Also does it also suffer from the over aggressive local dimming which results in loss of detail in dark scenes (e.g. The Star field in Gravity actually showing less stars than on other TVs.)

Sorry for all the questions, I'm just curious :)
The fact that you are asking this says to me you didn't read the review. Please refer to the section in the review which does indeed talk about these issues.
 

Phil Hinton

Editor
Staff member
Quote from review:

"If you want absolutely contrast and blacks for movie watching in a dim viewing room, with the occasional gaming session, then OLED is the choice for that use case. If however you have a normal living room with bright lighting during the day and at night, you game for hours at a time and are concerned about possible image retention, then an LCD TV is more suited to your use case."

Where's the evidence that playing games on an OLED is somehow inferior or something you shouldn't do to often for fear of damaging the screen? I've had mine for over a year now and play games regularly, I've had no screen issues, lag issues, or frankly anything that supports this view that there is a problem with gaming and OLED. Is there evidence for this or is it just theoretical?
The context is that it is possible to get image retention and in very rare cases screen burn from overdoing it with activities like gaming, where there are static images on the screen for a long period of time and in bright picture settings. It usually also happens when proper care is not taken to look after the TV properly. In no way does that infer that OLED is not a good device for gaming on, but rather care should be taken to properly look after the panel so that it doesn't become an issue. Some people don't want to look after the panel or have the possibility of retention, so for them, LCD is perhaps a better choice. It's all about being balanced in what we recommend within our reviews.
 

Phil Hinton

Editor
Staff member
Thank you Phil,very good review and timely.
Will appreciate your help on these questions:

Thank you in advance for your help in addressing above questions.
I have answered most of those questions in the review or above. Also while the out of the box readings are slightly off, the actual viewing experience wasn't that bad and I doubt anybody other than those with a keen eye would notice any issues.
 

Coulson

Well-known Member
The fact that you are asking this says to me you didn't read the review. Please refer to the section in the review which does indeed talk about these issues.
Hi Phil
I did read the review, so from your answer I would infer that unless you are using the highest local dimming setting it doesn't suffer from the same issue as the Q9.

Thanks :)
 

Coulson

Well-known Member
No it follows things as they should be when set up correctly. You can see that in the graphs in the review and the text. I believe that the reviewer was highlighting HDR PQ curve variance, (not Rec709). It is bang on here with the Q8DN.


The fact that you are asking this says to me you didn't read the review. Please refer to the section in the review which does indeed talk about these issues.
So the Q9 could be "fixed" with a firmware upgrade if it hasn't already happened. Now all Samsung need to do is to "fix" the broken price model and they could blow Sony out of water. As it stand's they are still not worth it.
 

Phil Hinton

Editor
Staff member
Hi Phil
I did read the review, so from your answer I would infer that unless you are using the highest local dimming setting it doesn't suffer from the same issue as the Q9.

Thanks :)
Sorry, but it has been known for many users to just pop here and ask without reading the review or just skimming it. The dimming is aggressive in all modes and can't be switched off. In the highest setting, it actually does suppress image detail, but not so much in the mid and min settings, but it is still aggressive and also at times slow. I have the Q9 here at the moment, but I am off on holiday tomorrow so won't get a chance to do any testing until I get back. But on the Q8 I didn't see any issues as long as the contrast enhancer is switched off.
 

Phil Hinton

Editor
Staff member
Yes, the Q8DN pricing does it no favours against the Q9FN and in our opinion, the Q9 would be the better choice given more zones and other things like the one-connect box while the pricing is so similar.
 

Coulson

Well-known Member
Sorry, but it has been known for many users to just pop here and ask without reading the review or just skimming it.
No problem, I have been guilty of that before so it is fair comment and I took it as such.
 

Goldorak

Distinguished Member
I have answered most of those questions in the review or above. Also while the out of the box readings are slightly off, the actual viewing experience wasn't that bad and I doubt anybody other than those with a keen eye would notice any issues.
for the record, I also read the review in details but wanted to know more about the agressive dimming and what you would think of the q8 if it was priced right versus q9 and xf9.
You answered the former very well. The latter, is indeed a difficult one. Thank you for your review, very detailed.
Édit: you just answered the latter too :)
 

Matson

Distinguished Member
Quote from review:

"If you want absolutely contrast and blacks for movie watching in a dim viewing room, with the occasional gaming session, then OLED is the choice for that use case. If however you have a normal living room with bright lighting during the day and at night, you game for hours at a time and are concerned about possible image retention, then an LCD TV is more suited to your use case."

Where's the evidence that playing games on an OLED is somehow inferior or something you shouldn't do to often for fear of damaging the screen? I've had mine for over a year now and play games regularly, I've had no screen issues, lag issues, or frankly anything that supports this view that there is a problem with gaming and OLED. Is there evidence for this or is it just theoretical?

Your question doesn't really match up with the quote you provided. He didn't say it was inferior for playing games in that quote only that in a bright living room environment with bright lighting if you game for hours and are concerned about image retention the LCD is suited more.
 

mclingo

Member
going to be a really tuff sell at that price unless you really really want those extra nits.
 

SunnyIntervals

Active Member
Your question doesn't really match up with the quote you provided. He didn't say it was inferior for playing games in that quote only that in a bright living room environment with bright lighting if you game for hours and are concerned about image retention the LCD is suited more.
What I'm saying does match up, but I don't want to de-rail what should be a discussion about this new tv, so I'll leave it there.
 

zeppelino

Well-known Member
Could be a good set to pick up after CES 2019, when prices become more “viable” for most. Doesn’t help that they messed up their european range from the outset.

This might make the edge lit Q8 a bargain in next few months.
 

JohnnyVertigo

Standard Member
"Q Colour technology refers to the use of quantum dots, which were introduced in 2017"

Quantum dots were introduced in 2016 KS series.
 

clydebest

Distinguished Member
Good to hear viewing Football mentioned , but that banding could be seen (even if in the reviewers view minor) once seen you will always see it .. if i was confident the QF9 would have been banding free , i may well have tried one.
 

encaser

Member
"The context is that it is possible to get image retention and in very rare cases screen burn from overdoing it with activities like gaming, where there are static images on the screen for a long period of time and in bright picture settings. It usually also happens when proper care is not taken to look after the TV properly. In no way does that infer that OLED is not a good device for gaming on, but rather care should be taken to properly look after the panel so that it doesn't become an issue."
Is that a fair comment from a reviewer - in particular, "..overdoing it..."? When people game, in your example, they do so to get to their best possible place and don't want to stop and have in the back of their mind I need to stop at X, whatever that is - the over do it point? There are similarly people who have reported burn in from viewing news feeds, children's TV etc., should they also instinctively know this "overdoing it" point and that they are not acting "properly"?
 
Last edited:

Phil Hinton

Editor
Staff member
"The context is that it is possible to get image retention and in very rare cases screen burn from overdoing it with activities like gaming, where there are static images on the screen for a long period of time and in bright picture settings. It usually also happens when proper care is not taken to look after the TV properly. In no way does that infer that OLED is not a good device for gaming on, but rather care should be taken to properly look after the panel so that it doesn't become an issue."
Is that a fair comment from a reviewer - in particular, "..overdoing it..."? When people game, in your example, they do so to get to their best possible place and don't want to stop and have in the back of their mind I need to stop at X, whatever that is - the over do it point? There are similarly people who have reported burn in from viewing news feeds, children's TV etc., should they also instinctively know this "overdoing it" point and that they are not acting "properly"?
I would have thought it was common sense really. I'm surprised that it would need explaining in more detail. If you are going to use an OLED panel in picture modes other than the accurate ones and at an increased brightness over those, you should be aware that you may have issues with retention, when gaming with static onscreen HUDs, the same as with news or channel logos. Protection is built-in to all new OLED TVs to help combat those issues as well. However, some users are concerned with such things and this puts them off the idea of an OLED and they want brighter HDR images that OLED cannot yet produce, so an LCD is a better option. Again, it is about being balanced in an appraisal and trying to cover all possible use cases for forum members when reviewing an item. So yes, it is absolutely right that I mention these things. If there needs to be any further discussion of this point, please start a thread in the OLED forum as this is a review thread for an LCD TV, so let's not derail it with OLED chat, please.
 

cooperda

Well-known Member
Nope, in 2015 JS-models :)!
I 'still' have the Samsung JS6400 50" and I don't have Q-Dot - it's 8-BIT colour - and via a Firmware update can work with HDR - but doesn't purport to display as intended.

Still I think it produces a great image :)

Cheers, Dave C
 

Attachments

encaser

Member
I would have thought it was common sense really. I'm surprised that it would need explaining in more detail. If you are going to use an OLED panel in picture modes other than the accurate ones and at an increased brightness over those, you should be aware that you may have issues with retention, when gaming with static onscreen HUDs, the same as with news or channel logos. Protection is built-in to all new OLED TVs to help combat those issues as well. However, some users are concerned with such things and this puts them off the idea of an OLED and they want brighter HDR images that OLED cannot yet produce, so an LCD is a better option. Again, it is about being balanced in an appraisal and trying to cover all possible use cases for forum members when reviewing an item. So yes, it is absolutely right that I mention these things. If there needs to be any further discussion of this point, please start a thread in the OLED forum as this is a review thread for an LCD TV, so let's not derail it with OLED chat, please.
"I would have thought it was common sense really."
That sounds beyond patronizing. You're reviewing a TV and making assertions that the general consumer may well not be aware of potential limitations and just heard/read from adverts etc. how great they are.
Do you not think that a consumer may see all the available settings and reasonably assume they are applicable and not possibly damaging to the set?
A fair review should surely take the time to be 'obvious' for those new to the subject and not assume familiarity.
 

Phil Hinton

Editor
Staff member
You're reviewing a TV and making assertions that the general consumer may well not be aware of potential limitations and just heard/read from adverts etc. how great they are.
Do you not think that a consumer may see all the available settings and reasonably assume they are applicable and not possibly damaging to the set?
A fair review should surely take the time to be 'obvious' for those new to the subject and not assume familiarity.
If you go back to the quote you originally posted, that wasn't your original complaint and it was fairly obvious what was being said, in my opinion. We can only highlight what might happen with certain use cases and that is making the reader aware of the potential issue. I am sorry you don't think that is the case.
 

BRAKKUS1

Distinguished Member
Mine was ok with SDR, but sucked with HDR. What triggered my move to OLED!
HDR used to destroy me lol, the clouding, THE CLOUDING !! I was trying to play Gears of War 4 in HDR when the XB1S first came out, and those dark scenes just ruined the enjoyment, I kept moving the camera back n forth over a dodgy section, trying to convince myself it wasn't that bad haha, 1 week later the JS9000 broke and boy was I pleased :)
 

encaser

Member
If you go back to the quote you originally posted, that wasn't your original complaint and it was fairly obvious what was being said, in my opinion. We can only highlight what might happen with certain use cases and that is making the reader aware of the potential issue. I am sorry you don't think that is the case.
Phil, let's jog on.
 

Similar threads

Trending threads

Latest News

Philips 4th Gen P5 processor adds AI for more realistic images
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
LG regards HDR10+ as unnecessary
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Netflix US subscriber growth slowed by competition
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
LG Mini LED concept TV unveiled
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Top Bottom