Samsung q80t, Sony x900h or other

Dodgexander

Moderator
HDMI 2.0 has enough bandwidth for 4:4:4 8bit RGB 4k 60hz.
HDMI 2.1 is required if you want 4:4:4 10bit RGB 4k 60hz (or higher).

I think the 2015 JU7100 had one or two HDMI 2.0 ports, but it may also have 1 or two HDMI 1.4. With HDMI 1.4 sometimes you can do 4k 60hz at 4:2:0 but more often or not its limited to 4k 30hz.

You will have to wait a while to know for sure how 2021 ranges stand in comparison to 2020, I don't even release my best buy guide each year until Black Friday since that tends to be the time we know a bit more about the new TVs, and also the time the first serious reductions happen. If you are not sold on any current TV on the market, you could wait and see then.
 

Spectator

Member
HDMI 2.0 has enough bandwidth for 4:4:4 8bit RGB 4k 60hz.
HDMI 2.1 is required if you want 4:4:4 10bit RGB 4k 60hz (or higher).

I think the 2015 JU7100 had one or two HDMI 2.0 ports, but it may also have 1 or two HDMI 1.4. With HDMI 1.4 sometimes you can do 4k 60hz at 4:2:0 but more often or not its limited to 4k 30hz.

You will have to wait a while to know for sure how 2021 ranges stand in comparison to 2020, I don't even release my best buy guide each year until Black Friday since that tends to be the time we know a bit more about the new TVs, and also the time the first serious reductions happen. If you are not sold on any current TV on the market, you could wait and see then.
I think you have convinced me to wait a year or two. For my photo editing & watching photos as an enthusiast photographer, I would want that 10-bit from Windows, now that Nvidia seems to have made it possible for consumers. For that I need HDMI 2.1 port, so XH95 is not future-proof enough for my purposes.

It sucks that XJ95 is not in 55" size, but maybe in two years I can buy the cheaper model from Sony if it is bright enough then, or a Samsung LCD. The HDMI 2.1 technology is also likely more refined. And at that time Rtings new burn-in test for OLED's has given us new information.

In any case this contemplation has given me a lot of information about the TV technology, which will help me observe these things in the coming years. Thank you very much!
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
10bit can be done on HDMI 2.0 but only by using YPbPr and not RGB. To achieve this at 4k chroma is dropped from 4:4:4 to 4:2:2 which is fine for video, not sure on images.

If you are photo editing you'll probably want to focus on getting a TV with the most picture accuracy out of the box, that is unless you plan on pro calibration. Computer monitors designed for professional use are probably better than TVs overall for this purpose, but there's no harm as an enthusiast using a TV if you also plan to use it for other things.

But yeah, if there's nothing compelling to you now, just wait. You'll only end up wishing later you would have waited if you find something about your new TV that you don't like.
 

Spectator

Member
10bit can be done on HDMI 2.0 but only by using YPbPr and not RGB. To achieve this at 4k chroma is dropped from 4:4:4 to 4:2:2 which is fine for video, not sure on images.

If you are photo editing you'll probably want to focus on getting a TV with the most picture accuracy out of the box, that is unless you plan on pro calibration. Computer monitors designed for professional use are probably better than TVs overall for this purpose, but there's no harm as an enthusiast using a TV if you also plan to use it for other things.

But yeah, if there's nothing compelling to you now, just wait. You'll only end up wishing later you would have waited if you find something about your new TV that you don't like.
Yeah, I would want that 4:4:4 ability for desktop use, when I upgrade my graphics card. Updating my computer is relevant in a few years anyway, and then I might play a bit more too. My current computer is very old besides my graphics card. Updating will help the photo editing as my current 1050 Ti is not the fastest. I have Benq SW240 for editing, but mostly when the editing is not that important, I can use my TV.

Samsung QN90A is actually looking pretty good, and seems great out of the box, so I might watch that one in the coming year and when the price gets closer to 1000 €. The starting price is apparently something like 1900-2000 €. Q90T started at 2000 € here and got to 1300 € (edit. actually it was 1200 € at a certain point), so the price drop was less than Sony models. I think 1200 € is the max. I'm comfortable paying.

Also now I understood better what you meant with this bright TV not needing Dolby Vision. Apparently when the TV is bright enough, there is not much need for it, and it's better for worse models.
 
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Spectator

Member
HDR format support comes secondary to how well the TV can display HDR to begin with. A TV like the QN90A will reproduce the HDR10 layer of Dolby Vision titles better than many Dolby Vision TVs will.
One more thing. Looking at Samsung TV's at Rtings DSE list, it seems Samsung's are not performing well. Even the new QN90A for its price is pretty awful.

XH90 got 8.1, XH95 got 7.6. Q90T got 7.1 and QN90A got also 7.1.

Some people say that one shouldn't basically buy a Samsung LCD if one watches a lot of sports.

What do you think? It's a panel lottery, but still Samsung's seem to have more of this problem.

Also do you have any idea when Rtings will start their new burn-in test for OLED's this year?

If XJ90 is not very good, I might have to risk OLED in two years time. In their last test it took like 9 months for FIFA etc. to show problems, so it might be able to give me new information about new OLED's.

 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Uniformity is always a mixed bag, you can get good and bad samples. Does seem like Sony's tend to fair better than Samsung models with grays though, which is important to not notice DSE in sport.

Generally people would choose Sony over Samsung for sport anyway, for motion.

No idea with rtings.com new burn in test. 5000 hours before seeing burn in on a high risk game like FIFA is actually pretty good imo.
 

Spectator

Member
Uniformity is always a mixed bag, you can get good and bad samples. Does seem like Sony's tend to fair better than Samsung models with grays though, which is important to not notice DSE in sport.

Generally people would choose Sony over Samsung for sport anyway, for motion.

No idea with rtings.com new burn in test. 5000 hours before seeing burn in on a high risk game like FIFA is actually pretty good imo.
Yeah, I just pray X90J will be great, but don't have my hopes up. I might buy the GN90A and check if DSE in sport bothers me with it. I can always return it, but I'm not one to switch same TV many times. Do you know of any article/video which gives advice how to test a TV?

This statement is from Week 42. FIFA had the first mention of uniformity issues at Week 32. So with my bad math skills, I'd estimate that FIFA would develop first issues in 5 years of 2 hours per day usage.

I estimate, that I use TV as a computer monitor more than 2 hours per day. So it isn't a very enticing option for me. But the hope is that the new OLED's have improved technology and software to prevent burn-in.

Do you know if the new LG lineup has even better tricks to prevent it than CX had?

"To see how the results at this 5000 hour point compares to your usage, divide 5000 by the number of hours you watch each type of content per day to find the number of days. For example, someone who plays call of duty or another video game without bright static areas for 2 hours per day may expect similar results after about 2500 days of usage. This corresponds to about 7 years."

 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Do you know of any article/video which gives advice how to test a TV?
You can use some of the test slides and videos from rtings.com website. Although I'd advise first using the TV with things you use (real world content) as if you search for an issue in a test pattern first, you'll less likely to 'unsee' any uniformity problems.
I estimate, that I use TV as a computer monitor more than 2 hours per day. So it isn't a very enticing option for me. But the hope is that the new OLED's have improved technology and software to prevent burn-in.
It depends on your personal usage, you can't really compare computer monitor usage directly to FIFA. This would be a worse case scenario. That is unless your usage has lots of bright, static and colourful elements on the screen often.
Do you know if the new LG lineup has even better tricks to prevent it than CX had?
The G1 and above do, the C1/A1 don't.
 

Mr MRK

Standard Member
Apologies for joining this thread but I was hoping I can get some advice here from the members.
I have purchased Samsung 65Q80T direct from Samsung as I was getting discount through my employer scheme. However I didn't realise that the warranty is only 1 year. I am within the window to return the TV and can Opt for Sony 65XH9005 for the same price - but this will come with 5 year warranty.
I am now super confused on what to do. So the exam question is which should be the better buy if they are exactly at same price ~ GBP 900 for 65 inch. Where Samsung is coming with one year warranty and Sony with 5 years.
I use the TV purely for Netflix / Prime videos, have all apps on Fire TV 4k and connect with a good AV setup. So not concerned about Sound / on board apps.

Appreciate advice from members here.
 

Spectator

Member
Apologies for joining this thread but I was hoping I can get some advice here from the members.
I have purchased Samsung 65Q80T direct from Samsung as I was getting discount through my employer scheme. However I didn't realise that the warranty is only 1 year. I am within the window to return the TV and can Opt for Sony 65XH9005 for the same price - but this will come with 5 year warranty.
I am now super confused on what to do. So the exam question is which should be the better buy if they are exactly at same price ~ GBP 900 for 65 inch. Where Samsung is coming with one year warranty and Sony with 5 years.
I use the TV purely for Netflix / Prime videos, have all apps on Fire TV 4k and connect with a good AV setup. So not concerned about Sound / on board apps.

Appreciate advice from members here.
My advice would be to get XH95, not XH90. XH95 is on another level for HDR and some other things. I think it is even better than Q80T for your use case. Q90T is the rival for XH95.
 

Mr MRK

Standard Member
My advice would be to get XH95, not XH90. XH95 is on another level for HDR and some other things. I think it is even better than Q80T for your use case. Q90T is the rival for XH95.
Thanks, but X95 is clearly beyond my budget, so the decision is between q80t or XH90.
 

Spectator

Member
Thanks, but X95 is clearly beyond my budget, so the decision is between q80t or XH90.
Ah, okay. Here in Finland XH95 55" is 1000 €, and Q80T is 900 € like XH90. Q90T is 1300 €. Unless the situation has changed in these couple of days I have observed.

I think Q80T is better for you, but that warranty thing is a weird situation. I would assume 2 years is the minimum the laws require for electronics.
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
The Q80T is a bit better with HDR than the Sony XH9005 as it almost meets 1000 nits in small windows, whereas the Sony only around 750.

The warranty is standard 1 year on all products by the manufacturer. Anything extra is a promotion from the store. So in the case of the 5 year warranties you see, first year is manufacturer, the 4 remaining by a 3rd party insurer.
I use the TV purely for Netflix / Prime videos, have all apps on Fire TV 4k and connect with a good AV setup. So not concerned about Sound / on board apps.
Since you have some HDR usage there, you probably want to go for the TV with better HDR picture quality which will be the Q80T.
 

Mr MRK

Standard Member
The Q80T is a bit better with HDR than the Sony XH9005 as it almost meets 1000 nits in small windows, whereas the Sony only around 750.

The warranty is standard 1 year on all products by the manufacturer. Anything extra is a promotion from the store. So in the case of the 5 year warranties you see, first year is manufacturer, the 4 remaining by a 3rd party insurer.

Since you have some HDR usage there, you probably want to go for the TV with better HDR picture quality which will be the Q80T.
Thanks, to be honest I am quite happy with Q80T and thought it's a good buy at £880 that I paid. However this warranty concern is at the back of my mind and Samsung doesn't even sell extended warranties. Should I just be at peace with my purchase and ditch the thought of swapping? I am hoping Samsung should be reliable and last me 5-6 years before I upgrade / change again?
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Its up to you, most warranties aren't used. If they were they wouldn't be giving them away for free. Its purely for peace of mind. Prices change a lot on TVs too, wouldn't be untoward to see the Q80T selling for less than that with a 5 year warranty.

I remember last years model of the same ilk (Q70R) sold for about £750 with a 5 year warranty in clearance as the Q80T came out to replace it.
 

Mr MRK

Standard Member
Its up to you, most warranties aren't used. If they were they wouldn't be giving them away for free. Its purely for peace of mind. Prices change a lot on TVs too, wouldn't be untoward to see the Q80T selling for less than that with a 5 year warranty.

I remember last years model of the same ilk (Q70R) sold for about £750 with a 5 year warranty in clearance as the Q80T came out to replace it.
Thanks for the reassurance :)
 

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