Quantcast

Samsung NU8000 Owners Thread

LCD HD

Active Member
I feel as though ANYTHING FALD would have to be better at this point.
Just saw my brother's FALD Sony two days ago.
He was playing some HDR game and went into the menus to save.
The screen displayed a complete black background, with some white text at the bottom right.

On the area around that text (about 1/8 of the screen) blooming was just like the NU.
Over the rest of the screen it was pitch black (as expected).

That's the only difference, FALD limits blooming to one area.
But the amount of blooming itself is the same as the NU (or higher)...

(Personal subjective observation, of course ;) )
 

Vagval13

Novice Member
This is Blade Runner (the original one) in 4k uhd. It is generally speaking a very demanding film with almost every scene having many different light sources that will challenge the screen and local dimming non stop. Well taking into account what the other person said about his nu8000 lighting up like an xmass tree sort of thing i would assume the black here would be grey?
 

Attachments

LCD HD

Active Member
(Sorry for posting in a row but this is about a diferent subject :) )

Just got the 1290 update. Changes seem to be:
- better whitepoint/color correction for highlights (no grenish tint shift on highlights)
- better upscaling (compression artifacts less visible)

Don't notice any deference regading brightness or blacks.
This on movie mode and on the 49''.

Totally subjective of course, but this is my visual impression.
 

Foster1984

Well-known Member
A little help, I’m going to buy a 55 tv, I have the nu8000 and the ru8000 and maybe the hisense u7b in mind, my first choice is a nu8000 but last year I got one that I returned because when viewing Netflix with subtitles the luminance would go up and down and was unbearable. Was this problem solved?

Any suggestions about my thoughts?

thanks
The changes in dimming still happen, content depending, and based on the global dimming algorithm.

It can be mitigated, but not without changing some values within the service menu.

The RU8000, although the replacement for the NU8000, is actually a step down in performance. With it performing worse, pretty much across all areas.

I am unsure of the Hisense’s performance; but I don’t see it on many best buy lists. Whilst the NU8000 still makes many best buy lists within this price point. But it is becoming harder to find since it is an “out-dated” model.
 

Razer08

Active Member
Just saw my brother's FALD Sony two days ago.
He was playing some HDR game and went into the menus to save.
The screen displayed a complete black background, with some white text at the bottom right.

On the area around that text (about 1/8 of the screen) blooming was just like the NU.
Over the rest of the screen it was pitch black (as expected).

That's the only difference, FALD limits blooming to one area.
But the amount of blooming itself is the same as the NU (or higher)...

(Personal subjective observation, of course ;) )
Which sony model was it? Sony has been dropping the ball for a few years so I'm interested to see which model your brother has.

I cannot stress how dramatic gentle bias lighting can make to black levels. If I owned the NU8000 (I was tempted to buy instead of my current Sony) then bias lighting is a must.
 

LCD HD

Active Member
49'' Sony X900F. To me it's slightly better than the NU regarding color saturation / purity on SDR sources (altough the latest updated has improved this for the NU).
But I see no real difference regarding black - both look good.
 

LCD HD

Active Member
It can be mitigated, but not without changing some values within the service menu.
I think I'm on to something...

Try selecting HDR+ mode and bringing the backlight down to ~11.
It seems to disable the dimming algorithm :eek: !

I tested this on the AVSHD709 "5 - dynamic brightness" pattern. Once I bring backlight down, I get a stable image. Perhaps you can check it with measurement equipment ?
 

IntelliVolume

Active Member
I think I'm on to something...

Try selecting HDR+ mode and bringing the backlight down to ~11.
It seems to disable the dimming algorithm :eek: !

I tested this on the AVSHD709 "5 - dynamic brightness" pattern. Once I bring backlight down, I get a stable image. Perhaps you can check it with measurement equipment ?
I, personally, wouldn't use HDR+ mode just to fix an issue like this. As it stands I already use a backlight of "11" for SDR...
 

IntelliVolume

Active Member
49'' Sony X900F. To me it's slightly better than the NU regarding color saturation / purity on SDR sources (altough the latest updated has improved this for the NU).
But I see no real difference regarding black - both look good.
Interestingly (sadly?) enough, my North American NU hasn't auto updated this yet...
 

IntelliVolume

Active Member
This is Blade Runner (the original one) in 4k uhd. It is generally speaking a very demanding film with almost every scene having many different light sources that will challenge the screen and local dimming non stop. Well taking into account what the other person said about his nu8000 lighting up like an xmass tree sort of thing i would assume the black here would be grey?
It was me who mentioned the NU lights up like a "grey Christmas tree"...I'm going to watch your video now, but all I can say as a prerequisite going into it is that I have no answer as to why some people here are seeing little to no light bleed with their panels while I am seeing copious amounts.

As I mentioned previously, I'm not getting into reaching out to Samsung about a bad panel; that ship has sailed after what I went through with a supposedly bad HDMI board in this set. I'd just as soon buy a different display.
 

IntelliVolume

Active Member
Just saw my brother's FALD Sony two days ago.
He was playing some HDR game and went into the menus to save.
The screen displayed a complete black background, with some white text at the bottom right.

On the area around that text (about 1/8 of the screen) blooming was just like the NU.
Over the rest of the screen it was pitch black (as expected).

That's the only difference, FALD limits blooming to one area.
But the amount of blooming itself is the same as the NU (or higher)...

(Personal subjective observation, of course ;) )
I understand your passion -- along with some others in this thread, like Foster -- regarding the attempt to make me see that FALD is just as "guilty" of bloom than edge-lit...and I totally get that SOME light bleed is going to occur on ANY LCD, as it's a side effect of the tech. I do.

I'm just saying that I'd give FALD a try once I get rid of this Samsung if only because we wouldn't (probably) be able to afford an OLED at our desired size, and thus there'd really be no other option in terms of tech (I wouldn't, obviously, go back to edge-lit).

Speaking of which...is there ANY manufacturer still making an edge-lit panel outside of Samsung?
 

IntelliVolume

Active Member
Solid (to me at least) analysis of the nit levels for the latest HDR versions of Star Wars:

And the same for The Mandalorian:

They discuss nits and mastering in some detail.
Watching these videos now, LCD...

I totally get what Vincent is saying about dumping HDR into an SDR container, specifically with his examples of the original Star Wars trilogy, and can agree with the sentiment suggesting this is "wasting" the potential of the display when the backlight has been cranked up to max and such...however, I feel like I didn't get any answers regarding Vag's assessment that suggests all HDR films are mastered at 100 nits like SDR variants (unless I misunderstood Vag's point)...
 
Last edited:

IntelliVolume

Active Member
This is Blade Runner (the original one) in 4k uhd. It is generally speaking a very demanding film with almost every scene having many different light sources that will challenge the screen and local dimming non stop. Well taking into account what the other person said about his nu8000 lighting up like an xmass tree sort of thing i would assume the black here would be grey?
In looking at your image, I can indeed see some light bloom into the letterboxing areas, as minor as it may be -- and it seems like there is SOME kind of bias light in the background of the panel (unless I'm mistaken) as I can make out a light source there...MY room is COMPLETELY and TOTALLY black, and this makes HDR on my NU look way too raised and blown out in terms of letterboxing areas.
 

LCD HD

Active Member
I understand your passion -- along with some others in this thread, like Foster -- regarding the attempt to make me see that FALD is just as "guilty" of bloom than edge-lit...and I totally get that SOME light bleed is going to occur on ANY LCD, as it's a side effect of the tech. I do.
I just don't want you to have false hopes and waste your money on something that still has the same problem ;)
 

LCD HD

Active Member
I, personally, wouldn't use HDR+ mode just to fix an issue like this. As it stands I already use a backlight of "11" for SDR...
Sure, it was just a crazy test. You know that I like experimenting a bit :)
It needs some testing to see what else it changes.
Perhaps Foster with his equipment can share some light on this.
 

Foster1984

Well-known Member
Sure, it was just a crazy test. You know that I like experimenting a bit :)
It needs some testing to see what else it changes.
Perhaps Foster with his equipment can share some light on this.
I only got the update last night, as didn't manually update via USB this time.

Will give the test a go once I have some time, likely this weekend.
 

Vagval13

Novice Member
In looking at your image, I can indeed see some light bloom into the letterboxing areas, as minor as it may be -- and it seems like there is SOME kind of bias light in the background of the panel (unless I'm mistaken) as I can make out a light source there...MY room is COMPLETELY and TOTALLY black, and this makes HDR on my NU look way too raised and blown out in terms of letterboxing areas.
It is just a very small light bulb and it is way behind the tv, it can't even be considered as bias lighting so i can assure you it makes no difference on the outcome. Point being i think that what you describe must be some sort of faulty backlight!
 

Razer08

Active Member
It was me who mentioned the NU lights up like a "grey Christmas tree"...I'm going to watch your video now, but all I can say as a prerequisite going into it is that I have no answer as to why some people here are seeing little to no light bleed with their panels while I am seeing copious amounts.

As I mentioned previously, I'm not getting into reaching out to Samsung about a bad panel; that ship has sailed after what I went through with a supposedly bad HDMI board in this set. I'd just as soon buy a different display.
Some people notice blooming more than others. What may be fine for one person is horrible to the other so be careful about wholly believing claims about blooming as everyone eyes are different.

all HDR films are mastered at 100 nits like SDR variants
Hdr isn't mastered at 100 nits, it's either 1000/4000 nits with specular highlights being near the upper range. Scenes that are mastered at 100 nits will be displayed at 100 nits in both sdr and hdr modes. Hdr doesn't mean brighter. Most scenes in hdr are never at the maximum luminance which I think is a misconception.
 

Vagval13

Novice Member
Some people notice blooming more than others. What may be fine for one person is horrible to the other so be careful about wholly believing claims about blooming as everyone eyes are different.


Hdr isn't mastered at 100 nits, it's either 1000/4000 nits with specular highlights being near the upper range. Scenes that are mastered at 100 nits will be displayed at 100 nits in both sdr and hdr modes. Hdr doesn't mean brighter. Most scenes in hdr are never at the maximum luminance which I think is a misconception.
Sorry what i ment is that movies are mastered in 100nits in general, to the source, so depending on HDR implementation for UHD blu rays you either are getting a proper result or you are getting an image that will not display properly when viewed on an HDR tv, and tbh won't make much of a difference anyway.
 

Razer08

Active Member
Sorry what i ment is that movies are mastered in 100nits in general, to the source, so depending on HDR implementation for UHD blu rays you either are getting a proper result or you are getting an image that will not display properly when viewed on an HDR tv, and tbh won't make much of a difference anyway.
Gotcha.
 

Speed69

Novice Member
Glad to hear Freesync works for you also. Now if I can just work out why the nu8000 does not consistently switch to HDR when starting HDR games, I will be happy. I often have to dashboard and then resume the game for it to kick in, so a possible handshake issue. It does not happen with HDR movies from another source, so I am starting to suspect this be related to the Xbox One X and perhaps being in the insider program.
Yep same happens to me but rarely. Must be an insider issue as I am in the program also. Alpha.
 

Foster1984

Well-known Member
Another long one, sorry!

Are you guys referring to the way the TV can bring up information about the resolution and input status? If so, with the smart remote, you can scroll over to the icon of the connected equipment and press on that...brings up the info about that input.
Due to never really using the smart remote, I wasn’t aware of this. Useful to know!

I'm going to put the OLEDs back on my "consideration" list for my next set, funds allowing...
:thumbsup:

I unfortunately do not have anyone in my area to attempt this, save for calling some home theater pros who did some work for us in the past in this house (in-ceiling speaker wiring, changing of our previous rear-projection Sony SXRD display's lamp, etc.).

I'll probably just stay out of the menu.
Possibly worth getting a quote from them? Depending on how much the dimming annoys you and how reasonable their usual prices are.

That's all well and fine; I just feel like, based on what I've experienced with this edge-lit set, SOMETHING has got to be better than what I'm seeing...and if I can't afford an OLED, it's gonna HAVE to be a premium LCD with FALD.
Fair enough; from my personal experience with this NU, something has got to be better thanwhat I'm experiencing. That's all I'm saying.
The placebo effect would play heavily into any difference you saw. Especially given you know the technical benefits of FALD and due to how negative your feelings are generally towards the NU.

IRL the perceived noticeable differences to your eye would likely be no better than the NU with bias lighting.

I understand your passion -- along with some others in this thread, like Foster -- regarding the attempt to make me see that FALD is just as "guilty" of bloom than edge-lit...and I totally get that SOME light bleed is going to occur on ANY LCD, as it's a side effect of the tech. I do.

I'm just saying that I'd give FALD a try once I get rid of this Samsung if only because we wouldn't (probably) be able to afford an OLED at our desired size, and thus there'd really be no other option in terms of tech (I wouldn't, obviously, go back to edge-lit).
We are doing it because once the FALD placebo improvement wears off, you would be stuck with another expensive TV that didn’t match your needs.

You would genuinely see no better improvement in blacks, spending $900 on a FALD as you would spending $30 on a D65 white lighting strip for bias lighting.

I have no answer as to why some people here are seeing little to no light bleed with their panels while I am seeing copious amounts.
Either you have a bad panel (which is what I’d put my money on), or you are very sensitive to noticing bloom.

Ironically, I would hope it is just that you have a bad panel.

As if you are sensitive to it, then it is even more likely that you’ll notice it on any LCD based TV. And with panel variances/panel lottery, demoing a model in a store will be useless, because the panel of the TV you buy might not be as good.

Which puts you back into OLED, or ideally projector, territory.

Speaking of which...is there ANY manufacturer still making an edge-lit panel outside of Samsung?
I know Samsung, Sony, LG and Toshiba all released edge-lit models in 2019. Only the LG featured local dimming, and it performed worse than the NU8000.

It is pretty much guaranteed that at least those manufacturers will also have 2020 models with edge-lit TVs.

Generally speaking; the manufacturers that don’t have edge-lit TVs only have direct-lit models in the lower ranges, with them putting FALD only in their premium range models.

Can anyone such as Foster confirm what Vag is saying here about most conversions to HDR "dimming the overall picture compared to SDR"? Is this actually happening?

This sounds curious...
however, I feel like I didn't get any answers regarding Vag's assessment that suggests all HDR films are mastered at 100 nits like SDR variants (unless I misunderstood Vag's point)...
@Razer08 has beaten me to this now because I was trying to answer everything in one, but I’ll try and add to it where I can.

Short answer:
  • It can dim the picture, it all depends on how the HDR is implemented; such as the Star Wars original trilogy and a lot of the Netflix HDR shows.
  • No, they aren’t mastered at 100 nits; but that doesn’t always matter either (see long answer). I think the thing @Vagval13 might have been on about is that the value for “diffuse white”. HDR maintains the limit for "diffuse white" (such as a white walls, paper, etc.) at 100 nits; which is the same as for SDR. Luminance above 100 nits is restricted to highlights. This is the case for both HDR10 and DV (which promulgated the PQ EOTF).
Long answer:

HDR is a bit of a Wild West ATM. Normally, a HDR movie is mastered in either 1000 or 4000 nits; though there are some done in 8000 or even 10,000. But, and it’s a big but, this doesn’t mean this is what you are always seeing. As @Razer08 pointed out, it is a bit of a marketing misconception; for the most part the nit rating refers to what level of monitor was used for the grading…not what the movie is graded at.

When we say ''4000 nits mastered/graded'' it doesn't mean that the movie will have up to 4000 nits levels; it can be much lower or even much higher. Often, even though a movie is mastered on a monitor of a particular grade, the metadata contains 2 other values which have far more impact on how the movie presentation is viewed:
  • maxCLL - Maximum Content Light Level; the brightest sub-pixel of a frame (nits)
  • maxFALL - Maximum Frame-Average Light Level; the max APL of entire frame (nits)
Some examples of movies that have been under or over graded can be found in the attached pictures below; I have named the pictures accordingly.

Knowing what you are getting in terms of HDR, is made worse by the fact that the movies can differ by region, based on which POST house handled the mastering for that region’s disc. E.G. Blade Runner 2049 is Mastered at 10,000nits REC2020 colour space in the US release, but 4000nits DCI-P3 colour space in the UK. However, the UK version is actually brighter overall, with a maxCLL of 457nits and a maxFALL of 179nits; compared to the US maxCLL of 181nits and maxFALL of 73nits. So even though the US master is specified higher, the UK disc is much brighter in HDR presentation.

Other examples can be found on the HDR metadata frame info sample picture below, which also shows the maxCLL and maxFALL for those discs in their respective regions.

For movies which have had their MaxCLL & MaxFALL set to 0 nits (usually the 20th Century Fox releases), they typical default to the BDA recommendation of 1000 maxCLL and 400 maxFALL. Others can have calculated numbers based on percentages of the grading.

In the instances where the mastering was done with a 1000/4000/etc nits capable monitor, but the masterer wants it to contain brighter content exceeding this nits rating, the colorist has to use the waveform and RGB histogram and leave un-clipped content above the nit threshold of his monitor.

So as you can see, with a lack of standards currently set for HDR, it is a bit of a mess.

Lastly, below is a link to a spreadsheet with a list of movies on with their metadata shown, as displayed by a HDFury...for those interested.

 

Attachments

Last edited:

IntelliVolume

Active Member
I just don't want you to have false hopes and waste your money on something that still has the same problem ;)
I won't have "false hopes" and I truly don't believe I'd be back with the "same problem;" as I mentioned, blooming is so bad on certain material I view on the NU in the dark that anything has got to be better to my eyes. ;)
 

IntelliVolume

Active Member
Sure, it was just a crazy test. You know that I like experimenting a bit :)
It needs some testing to see what else it changes.
Perhaps Foster with his equipment can share some light on this.
As a test, it's fine and interesting; I just wouldn't use HDR+ going forward for regular viewing.
 

IntelliVolume

Active Member
I only got the update last night, as didn't manually update via USB this time.

Will give the test a go once I have some time, likely this weekend.
We (North America) still didn't get the auto update...
 

IntelliVolume

Active Member
It is just a very small light bulb and it is way behind the tv, it can't even be considered as bias lighting so i can assure you it makes no difference on the outcome. Point being i think that what you describe must be some sort of faulty backlight!
You'd be VERY surprised at what causes slight differences with bias lighting -- a diffuse light far off in the distance from our set dramatically changes the perception of pitch black letterbox bars, so when we view in complete darkness the blooming is ridiculously aggressive (more so with HDR, of course).

I am not the only one -- though, seemingly the only one HERE -- who feels this display is awful in the dark, and I've said that continuously throughout this thread; so while I may have gotten a panel a bit out of spec, even reviews of the NU have talked about inadequate black levels for serious dark-room viewing.

This seems to be going in a direction where I need to continuously explain why I don't care for certain of the NU's characteristics while everyone else seems compelled to defend the model with their passionate earnest; to be clear, I'm still an NU owner and thus like contributing to discussions here about the television, and it's been decent to us outside of my aforementioned complaints regarding its dark-room performance. All I can report is what I've been seeing with my own eyes and the particular sample I received, and to say that I didn't do my research as to what I was getting into with an edge-lit panel before I purchased. Now, to that last point, this is something I have been discussing with Foster with regard to not "beating myself up" too badly about not doing my homework before buying based on our budget constraints at the time, but I still feel bad that I didn't, perhaps, start off with a Full Array Local Dimming LCD (the Samsungs, getting into the QLED range, were out of our budget, though).

At any rate, I'm disappointed with the black levels of the NU in the dark for serious film watching (notably with HDR; SDR is tolerable for the most part) but you live and learn, and when I can trade up I will...in the meantime, I can continue swapping information, tips, tweaks and setting insight with you lads. :hiya:
 

IntelliVolume

Active Member
Some people notice blooming more than others. What may be fine for one person is horrible to the other so be careful about wholly believing claims about blooming as everyone eyes are different.
I'm not "wholly believing claims," I'm going by the majority of what I read in Samsung's own help forums and on other forums and in reviews -- and these are from what I understand are other film enthusiasts using their NU's in the same kind of environment I am.

What's more, I have even had in-depth back-and-forth email discussions with Daniel from Rtings and he even admitted that the NU isn't a good choice for serious cinema content -- according to him, fooling with the local dimming aggressiveness, backlight or brightness controls (or the gamma) isn't going to suddenly make this display "perfect" for HDR playback (in particular), and that regardless of what is being said in terms of the "positives" of the NU, it's not what they're seeing (or have seen) in their studios/labs.

Hdr isn't mastered at 100 nits, it's either 1000/4000 nits with specular highlights being near the upper range. Scenes that are mastered at 100 nits will be displayed at 100 nits in both sdr and hdr modes. Hdr doesn't mean brighter. Most scenes in hdr are never at the maximum luminance which I think is a misconception.
I understand that, which is why I was questioning Vag's analysis.
 

IntelliVolume

Active Member
Another long one, sorry!



Due to never really using the smart remote, I wasn’t aware of this. Useful to know!



:thumbsup:



Possibly worth getting a quote from them? Depending on how much the dimming annoys you and how reasonable their usual prices are.





The placebo effect would play heavily into any difference you saw. Especially given you know the technical benefits of FALD and due to how negative your feelings are generally towards the NU.

IRL the perceived noticeable differences to your eye would likely be no better than the NU with bias lighting.



We are doing it because once the FALD placebo improvement wears off, you would be stuck with another expensive TV that didn’t match your needs.

You would genuinely see no better improvement in blacks, spending $900 on a FALD as you would spending $30 on a D65 white lighting strip for bias lighting.



Either you have a bad panel (which is what I’d put my money on), or you are very sensitive to noticing bloom.

Ironically, I would hope it is just that you have a bad panel.

As if you are sensitive to it, then it is even more likely that you’ll notice it on any LCD based TV. And with panel variances/panel lottery, demoing a model in a store will be useless, because the panel of the TV you buy might not be as good.

Which puts you back into OLED, or ideally projector, territory.



I know Samsung, Sony, LG and Toshiba all released edge-lit models in 2019. Only the LG featured local dimming, and it performed worse than the NU8000.

It is pretty much guaranteed that at least those manufacturers will also have 2020 models with edge-lit TVs.

Generally speaking; the manufacturers that don’t have edge-lit TVs only have direct-lit models in the lower ranges, with them putting FALD only in their premium range models.





@Razer08 has beaten me to this now because I was trying to answer everything in one, but I’ll try and add to it where I can.

Short answer:
  • It can dim the picture, it all depends on how the HDR is implemented; such as the Star Wars original trilogy and a lot of the Netflix HDR shows.
  • No, they aren’t mastered at 100 nits; but that doesn’t always matter either (see long answer). I think the thing @Vagval13 might have been on about is that the value for “diffuse white”. HDR maintains the limit for "diffuse white" (such as a white walls, paper, etc.) at 100 nits; which is the same as for SDR. Luminance above 100 nits is restricted to highlights. This is the case for both HDR10 and DV (which promulgated the PQ EOTF).
Long answer:

HDR is a bit of a Wild West ATM. Normally, a HDR movie is mastered in either 1000 or 4000 nits; though there are some done in 8000 or even 10,000. But, and it’s a big but, this doesn’t mean this is what you are always seeing. As @Razer08 pointed out, it is a bit of a marketing misconception; for the most part the nit rating refers to what level of monitor was used for the grading…not what the movie is graded at.

When we say ''4000 nits mastered/graded'' it doesn't mean that the movie will have up to 4000 nits levels; it can be much lower or even much higher. Often, even though a movie is mastered on a monitor of a particular grade, the metadata contains 2 other values which have far more impact on how the movie presentation is viewed:
  • maxCLL - Maximum Content Light Level; the brightest sub-pixel of a frame (nits)
  • maxFALL - Maximum Frame-Average Light Level; the max APL of entire frame (nits)
Some examples of movies that have been under or over graded can be found in the attached pictures below; I have named the pictures accordingly.

Knowing what you are getting in terms of HDR, is made worse by the fact that the movies can differ by region, based on which POST house handled the mastering for that region’s disc. E.G. Blade Runner 2049 is Mastered at 10,000nits REC2020 colour space in the US release, but 4000nits DCI-P3 colour space in the UK. However, the UK version is actually brighter overall, with a maxCLL of 457nits and a maxFALL of 179nits; compared to the US maxCLL of 181nits and maxFALL of 73nits. So even though the US master is specified higher, the UK disc is much brighter in HDR presentation.

Other examples can be found on the HDR metadata frame info sample picture below, which also shows the maxCLL and maxFALL for those discs in their respective regions.

For movies which have had their MaxCLL & MaxFALL set to 0 nits (usually the 20th Century Fox releases), they typical default to the BDA recommendation of 1000 maxCLL and 400 maxFALL. Others can have calculated numbers based on percentages of the grading.

In the instances where the mastering was done with a 1000/4000/etc nits capable monitor, but the masterer wants it to contain brighter content exceeding this nits rating, the colorist has to use the waveform and RGB histogram and leave un-clipped content above the nit threshold of his monitor.

So as you can see, with a lack of standards currently set for HDR, it is a bit of a mess.

Lastly, below is a link to a spreadsheet with a list of movies on with their metadata shown, as displayed by a HDFury...for those interested.

I'll respond to this as soon as I can, A.
 

Vagval13

Novice Member
You'd be VERY surprised at what causes slight differences with bias lighting -- a diffuse light far off in the distance from our set dramatically changes the perception of pitch black letterbox bars, so when we view in complete darkness the blooming is ridiculously aggressive (more so with HDR, of course).

I am not the only one -- though, seemingly the only one HERE -- who feels this display is awful in the dark, and I've said that continuously throughout this thread; so while I may have gotten a panel a bit out of spec, even reviews of the NU have talked about inadequate black levels for serious dark-room viewing.

This seems to be going in a direction where I need to continuously explain why I don't care for certain of the NU's characteristics while everyone else seems compelled to defend the model with their passionate earnest; to be clear, I'm still an NU owner and thus like contributing to discussions here about the television, and it's been decent to us outside of my aforementioned complaints regarding its dark-room performance. All I can report is what I've been seeing with my own eyes and the particular sample I received, and to say that I didn't do my research as to what I was getting into with an edge-lit panel before I purchased. Now, to that last point, this is something I have been discussing with Foster with regard to not "beating myself up" too badly about not doing my homework before buying based on our budget constraints at the time, but I still feel bad that I didn't, perhaps, start off with a Full Array Local Dimming LCD (the Samsungs, getting into the QLED range, were out of our budget, though).

At any rate, I'm disappointed with the black levels of the NU in the dark for serious film watching (notably with HDR; SDR is tolerable for the most part) but you live and learn, and when I can trade up I will...in the meantime, I can continue swapping information, tips, tweaks and setting insight with you lads. :hiya:
Nooo, don't get me wrong, i am not passionately trying to defend this tv, i am just saying that for the price point it's dark room performance is generally very good and the reason is because it has a very high native contrast, a thing Samsung is always decent with. Obviously i showed this pic just to make the point that a tv that lights up like an xmas tree surely has an issue with the backlight.
The NU is decent enough but of course if you want serious dark room viewing it's either an oled or a very good qled.
And yes blooming is a very subjective thing depending on how you pay attention to certain details that matter to you, like scene transitions, uniformity etc, but mind you these are issues oled has also with ABL. Depending on the abl other tv's have smooth transitions between light and dark scenes others very abruptly lose brightness in transitions if the abl is too aggressive so you will notice abrupt change to brightness etc.
So this answer is simple. Get a Panasonic which is the answer to every problem in humanity in the tech space unless you are from the States.
 

IntelliVolume

Active Member
Nooo, don't get me wrong, i am not passionately trying to defend this tv, i am just saying that for the price point it's dark room performance is generally very good and the reason is because it has a very high native contrast, a thing Samsung is always decent with. Obviously i showed this pic just to make the point that a tv that lights up like an xmas tree surely has an issue with the backlight.
The NU is decent enough but of course if you want serious dark room viewing it's either an oled or a very good qled.
And yes blooming is a very subjective thing depending on how you pay attention to certain details that matter to you, like scene transitions, uniformity etc, but mind you these are issues oled has also with ABL. Depending on the abl other tv's have smooth transitions between light and dark scenes others very abruptly lose brightness in transitions if the abl is too aggressive so you will notice abrupt change to brightness etc.
So this answer is simple. Get a Panasonic which is the answer to every problem in humanity in the tech space unless you are from the States.
The image you provided was just one clip of one piece of content -- surely not enough to determine that I, personally, received a bad panel with a bad backlight.

There are moments with SDR -- AND HDR content, for that matter -- on my panel that come across looking like what you showed as an example...but it's few and far between, especially with HDR. So I can't go by one static clip taken from one moment in time from one particular film.

As for your Panny suggestion, I am in the States, so I'd have to "import" one. ;)
 
Last edited:

Similar threads

Trending threads

Latest News

Panasonic TVs get BritBox streaming app
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Clearaudio Concept turntable re-launched as Active edition
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Teufel announces Cinebar Ultima and Cinedeck TV sound solutions
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Sky adds 300 hours of Channel 5 box-sets
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Samsung Smart TVs from 2012-2015 require update for BBC iPlayer
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Top Bottom